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Old Indian, Ukrainian Variation, 4.Nf3 (A54)
1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 d6 3 Nc3 e5 4 Nf3

Number of games in database: 833
Years covered: 1907 to 2017
Overall record:
   White wins 37.2%
   Black wins 28.3%
   Draws 34.5%

Popularity graph, by decade

Explore this opening  |  Search for sacrifices in this opening.
PRACTITIONERS
With the White Pieces With the Black Pieces
Lev Polugaevsky  10 games
Vladimir Alatortsev  8 games
David Bronstein  8 games
David Bronstein  23 games
Evgeni Vasiukov  17 games
Isaac Boleslavsky  17 games
NOTABLE GAMES [what is this?]
White Wins Black Wins
C Van Tilbury vs D K Johansen, 2002
S Savchenko vs Savon, 1999
Bronstein vs Panno, 1954
Polugaevsky vs Nezhmetdinov, 1958
Lilienthal vs Nezhmetdinov, 1951
Pachman vs Bronstein, 1946
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 page 1 of 34; games 1-25 of 833  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. Dus Chotimirsky vs Chigorin 1-029 1907 MoscowA54 Old Indian, Ukrainian Variation, 4.Nf3
2. Dus Chotimirsky vs J Mieses ½-½28 1909 St. PetersburgA54 Old Indian, Ukrainian Variation, 4.Nf3
3. J A Watt vs G A Thomas  1-035 1913 Kent-Sussex Congress 1st Class BA54 Old Indian, Ukrainian Variation, 4.Nf3
4. Schlechter vs Tartakower 0-166 1917 ViennaA54 Old Indian, Ukrainian Variation, 4.Nf3
5. Alekhine vs NN 1-049 1918 St PetersburgA54 Old Indian, Ukrainian Variation, 4.Nf3
6. Bogoljubov vs Reti  ½-½79 1920 BerlinA54 Old Indian, Ukrainian Variation, 4.Nf3
7. G Fontein vs Euwe  ½-½35 1922 AmsterdamA54 Old Indian, Ukrainian Variation, 4.Nf3
8. Euwe vs Reti  ½-½48 1922 LondonA54 Old Indian, Ukrainian Variation, 4.Nf3
9. Gruenfeld vs Alekhine  ½-½21 1923 MargateA54 Old Indian, Ukrainian Variation, 4.Nf3
10. Euwe vs Reti  ½-½41 1923 Maehrisch-OstrauA54 Old Indian, Ukrainian Variation, 4.Nf3
11. Colle vs E Sapira 1-026 1925 Brussels BelgiumA54 Old Indian, Ukrainian Variation, 4.Nf3
12. Tartakower vs Colle ½-½29 1925 Baden-BadenA54 Old Indian, Ukrainian Variation, 4.Nf3
13. Euwe vs Saemisch 1-042 1925 AmsterdamA54 Old Indian, Ukrainian Variation, 4.Nf3
14. Kashdan vs O Chajes  1-040 1926 ChicagoA54 Old Indian, Ukrainian Variation, 4.Nf3
15. Nimzowitsch vs Ahues  1-031 1927 NiendorfA54 Old Indian, Ukrainian Variation, 4.Nf3
16. H Heinicke vs H Wagner  0-146 1930 MatchA54 Old Indian, Ukrainian Variation, 4.Nf3
17. Alatortsev vs F Bohatirchuk  ½-½63 1931 Ch URS (1/2 final)A54 Old Indian, Ukrainian Variation, 4.Nf3
18. Alatortsev vs Riumin  ½-½40 1934 USSR Championship 1934/35A54 Old Indian, Ukrainian Variation, 4.Nf3
19. E Reinhardt vs W Schoenmann  1-024 1935 GER-chA54 Old Indian, Ukrainian Variation, 4.Nf3
20. Tartakower vs R Grau 1-033 1935 WarsawA54 Old Indian, Ukrainian Variation, 4.Nf3
21. Ragozin vs Kan ½-½80 1936 MoscowA54 Old Indian, Ukrainian Variation, 4.Nf3
22. Alatortsev vs Kasparian  1-053 1937 URS-ch10A54 Old Indian, Ukrainian Variation, 4.Nf3
23. Pirc vs Tartakower  ½-½15 1937 7th olm finalA54 Old Indian, Ukrainian Variation, 4.Nf3
24. M Yudovich Sr. vs F Bohatirchuk  ½-½64 1938 URS-ch sfA54 Old Indian, Ukrainian Variation, 4.Nf3
25. I Appel vs Tartakower  0-134 1938 LodzA54 Old Indian, Ukrainian Variation, 4.Nf3
 page 1 of 34; games 1-25 of 833  PGN Download
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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Feb-14-04  Catfriend: Not really. Since if you have an objectively drawn position, you"ll lose it probably agaisnt a stronger player!
Feb-14-04  marcus13: So if it is good for black how come it is not play.
Feb-14-04  Catfriend: Because now many players hate playing for draw, no matter the color
Feb-14-04  marcus13: Look at the % of draw in recent tournament and you will see that the often play for draw.
Feb-14-04  Catfriend: No, you didn't understand me.. They maybe get draws, but they mostly don't choose a drawing opening. And on the top the lack of castle DOES influence
Feb-14-04  marcus13: Let conclude that I put it on Fritz and he gave o.59 for white.
Feb-14-04  drukenknight: after dxe5 the exchange of Q should be very bad for black.

I disagree that taking the Q off the board will help black by decreasing attacking possibilities. For one thing, Lasker won a good deal from such games.

Secondly, think about chess, it is always one tiny mistake you make. You dont need Qs on the board to make a small positional error. In fact, you will safer but probably be less careful.

I will do an opening explorer search (Nice feature!) and see what I can find on this..

Feb-14-04  Taidanii: I guess it's just me, but I really don't think the indian without a black fianchetto is the way to go.
Feb-14-04  drukenknight: black seems to do amazingly well in that 4 dxe5 line w/ Q exchange, beats me.
Feb-15-04  PVS: Bronstein played the black side of this opening for over fifty years and posted a plus score.
Feb-15-04  Catfriend: Yep, one of the things I based my words on. And computers rarely give black objective judgement in such positions.
Feb-15-04  drukenknight: in one of the databases, (chesslab.com) I think black had won 6 out of 7 or something. The best was a correspondence game that is not in this data base but I will email the administrator. Definitely worth studying this. I think the main line is 4....e4 5 Nc2
Feb-15-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  refutor: <<drukenknight>Secondly, think about chess, it is always one tiny mistake you make. > you must be a much stronger player than me DK, i'm still worried about the big mistakes as opposed to the tiny mistakes ;)
Feb-15-04  drukenknight: clearly 4 dxe5 is my mistake.
May-08-06  gauer: this looks like a good way of transposing into a king-pawn opening for black if white is known to play 1 d4 or c4 or Nf3. I prefer 1 ... d6 to 1 ... Nf6 if I know that white is also not an early (e|f)4 player. black can threaten to push an eventual ... e4, the diagonal open to develop the bishop to f5 or g4 (or possibly B(d7?!->c6) to encourage white d5, and retreat to Bd7). he may also get Nbd7, Be7, Nf8, Ng6, as in some Philidor lines, without committing to the Spanish tempo loss variation with Nc6->b8->d7. the exchange line dxe5 doesn't look too scary for black, and is not likely the critical line to squish black with. exd4 may be useful in some lines, but more critical tests are needed to decide whether white should initiate the dxe, or play the push d5, or keep the tension up for later by allowing the dxe4 pawn contact. i don't think black needs to take right away, and a white e4 like a way to avoid the black e4 push, so possibly a Kings Indian is still possible, but here, the bishop isn't committed to a fianchettoed blocked white centre, if he so chooses.
Sep-17-07  get Reti: <DK> Yeah, what about 4..e4? It seems pretty good as black now stops an e4.
Mar-18-09  just a kid: What about 4.dxe5 dxe5 5.Qc2.I have played this with success.
Mar-18-09  chessman95: <just a kid> I don't know, it seems better to exchange queens with a better endgame. In the 5.Qc2 line, it seems that after 5...Bc5 black has an easy game and probably the advantage. After the exchange of queens and the nice pin on g5 white has (at least) a slight advantage.
Mar-19-09  just a kid: after 5...Bc5 White can still get in 6.Bg5.
Mar-20-09  chessman95: I can't find anything wrong with what you said, I was just using computer analysis for this one. It gave black the adv after Qc2 and white the adv after an exchange. Experience probably plays the biggest factor in this line though...
Oct-01-09  deputy1: I am playing a e-mail game against a German player named Andreas Weinrich here are the moves:
1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 d6 3 Nc3 g6 4 Nf3 Bg7 5 e4 0-o 6 h3 c6 7 Be3 What is the best way to continue i think it may have transposed into a KID
Oct-01-09  NBZ: From my experience on the white side dxe5 dxe5 Qxd8 Kxd8 leads to an ending which is easier to play for black. The loss of castling rights is relatively unimportant, black will soon play c6 followed by Kd7-c8 anyway. A much more important feature of the position is the white pawn on c4, which weakens his q-side and gives black some nice dark squares to play with. Objectively it's still nothing special for black, but practically (since white will often be pushing for a win) black can expect to win a lot of games if queens are exchanged.
Mar-10-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: Opening of the Day :
Old Indian, Ukrainian Variation
1. d4 ♘f6 2.c4 d6 3.♘c3 e5 4.♘f3
Mar-27-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: Opening of the Day

Old Indian, Ukrainian Variation, 4.Nf3
1.d4 ♘f6 2.c4 d6 3.♘c3 e5 4.♘f3


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Oct-15-13  Kikoman: <Opening of the Day>

Old Indian, Ukrainian Variation, 4. Nf3
1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 d6 3. Nc3 e5 4. Nf3


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Opening Explorer

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