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Sicilian, Canal-Sokolsky (Rossolimo) Attack (B52)
1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 d6 3 Bb5+ Bd7

Number of games in database: 2601
Years covered: 1939 to 2014
Overall record:
   White wins 29.5%
   Black wins 22.5%
   Draws 48.1%

Popularity graph, by decade

Explore this opening  |  Search for sacrifices in this opening.
PRACTITIONERS
With the White Pieces With the Black Pieces
Sergei Rublevsky  34 games
Tomas Oral  25 games
Ni Hua  19 games
Boris Gelfand  18 games
Efim Geller  17 games
L Dominguez  16 games
NOTABLE GAMES [what is this?]
White Wins Black Wins
Kasparov vs The World, 1999
A Timofeev vs D Khismatullin, 2009
R Antonio vs Dao Thien Hai, 2005
Ivanchuk vs Shirov, 2009
Morozevich vs Topalov, 2005
A Zakharov vs A Petrushin, 1973
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 page 1 of 105; games 1-25 of 2,601  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. M Stoffels vs C Roodzant  ½-½32 1939 Wch (Women)B52 Sicilian, Canal-Sokolsky (Rossolimo) Attack
2. Alekhine vs E Pereiro ½-½35 1941 MalagaB52 Sicilian, Canal-Sokolsky (Rossolimo) Attack
3. Saemisch vs Sajtar  1-035 1942 ChocenB52 Sicilian, Canal-Sokolsky (Rossolimo) Attack
4. Sokolsky vs K Plater  ½-½43 1947 MoscowB52 Sicilian, Canal-Sokolsky (Rossolimo) Attack
5. Rossolimo vs H Mueller 1-021 1948 Bad GasteinB52 Sicilian, Canal-Sokolsky (Rossolimo) Attack
6. Boleslavsky vs Ravinsky 1-043 1949 LeningradB52 Sicilian, Canal-Sokolsky (Rossolimo) Attack
7. Rossolimo vs Szabados  1-044 1949 VeniceB52 Sicilian, Canal-Sokolsky (Rossolimo) Attack
8. Lilienthal vs Najdorf 0-137 1950 Budapest CandidatesB52 Sicilian, Canal-Sokolsky (Rossolimo) Attack
9. Boleslavsky vs Najdorf ½-½22 1950 Budapest CandidatesB52 Sicilian, Canal-Sokolsky (Rossolimo) Attack
10. B Kostic vs A Matanovic  0-161 1950 Bled itB52 Sicilian, Canal-Sokolsky (Rossolimo) Attack
11. Tartakower vs I Johansson  0-151 1950 Dubrovnik olmB52 Sicilian, Canal-Sokolsky (Rossolimo) Attack
12. C Hugot vs T Panagopoulos  1-050 1950 Dubrovnik olmB52 Sicilian, Canal-Sokolsky (Rossolimo) Attack
13. E Canal vs F Mastichiadis  ½-½33 1950 Dubrovnik olmB52 Sicilian, Canal-Sokolsky (Rossolimo) Attack
14. Book vs Gligoric  0-155 1950 Dubrovnik olmB52 Sicilian, Canal-Sokolsky (Rossolimo) Attack
15. Pilnik vs Reshevsky  ½-½21 1950 AmsterdamB52 Sicilian, Canal-Sokolsky (Rossolimo) Attack
16. Rossolimo vs Pilnik  ½-½44 1950 Mar del PlataB52 Sicilian, Canal-Sokolsky (Rossolimo) Attack
17. Rossolimo vs H Kramer  1-037 1950 BeverwijkB52 Sicilian, Canal-Sokolsky (Rossolimo) Attack
18. F J Perez Perez vs R Toran Albero  1-046 1951 MadridB52 Sicilian, Canal-Sokolsky (Rossolimo) Attack
19. G Pfeiffer vs E R Lundin  ½-½81 1952 Helsinki ol (Men)B52 Sicilian, Canal-Sokolsky (Rossolimo) Attack
20. H Platz vs F Scafarelli  1-039 1952 Helsinki ol (Men)B52 Sicilian, Canal-Sokolsky (Rossolimo) Attack
21. Taimanov vs Gligoric  0-146 1953 Zurich CandidatesB52 Sicilian, Canal-Sokolsky (Rossolimo) Attack
22. Larsen vs M Farre 1-048 1953 Wch U20 qual-BB52 Sicilian, Canal-Sokolsky (Rossolimo) Attack
23. L Alster vs Sajtar  1-031 1953 CSR-ch PragueB52 Sicilian, Canal-Sokolsky (Rossolimo) Attack
24. Boleslavsky vs Petrosian  ½-½23 1953 BucharestB52 Sicilian, Canal-Sokolsky (Rossolimo) Attack
25. I Livshin vs Petrosian  ½-½48 1954 URS-ch21B52 Sicilian, Canal-Sokolsky (Rossolimo) Attack
 page 1 of 105; games 1-25 of 2,601  PGN Download
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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Mar-03-04  BiLL RobeRTiE: Yeah, the Svesh sure is unique. =]
Mar-03-04  OneBadDog: <Also does anyone have advice on how to improve ones middlegame? I'm poor in the middle game, after usually doing quite well in the opening.>

The opening and middle game are closely related to each other. Improvement in the middle game depends on what your strengths and weaknesses are. If tactics are your weakness, reading The Art Of Attack In Chess in conjunction with a book like 1001 Chess Sacrifices And Combinations would help you. If strategic play is your weakness, then something like Pawn Structure Chess or Judgement And Planning In Chess would probably be best. If you have a hard time figuring out what to the best plan is once the opening is over, you can look at Everyman Chess Starting Out series.

Mar-03-04  PaulKeres: Thanks everyone for your responses. <boordgamer>, I am also just starting to use the Sicilian as my defence, before I used 1...e5 classically. Hmmmm, <prophylactic thinking>, something I'm interested in, because I don't do nearly enough of it! Wasn't Karpov the expert in this?
Mar-03-04  PaulKeres: I wonder whether your opening develops as you're level of opponent develops. For example, I am starting to consider the Sicilian now as Black because I face it myself as white such a lot. You certainly notice that beginners play entirely different opening from more advanced players. I find d4 players tend to be more experienced (either that or just scared of the sicilian ;) !) Also Kings indian lines and/or hypermodern openings tend to be used more by more advanced players and not by less experienced players. I think it is sensible to play openings which suit the level you are at, ie mainly you should not perhaps play into openings that you cannot cope with before your game can take it (eg closed games, or grunfeld). A good site with these types of views is http://www.ex.ac.uk/~dregis/DR/Open...
Mar-03-04  PaulKeres: <The opening and middle game are closely related to each other. >, that's good to hear < OneBadDog >, so hopefully my middle game can still improve as my opening theory does. It is very important to know what type of play you are and develop your plan around that, however I'm not sure which type I am. I would like to be a dynamical tactical player, but in reality I might well be more of a positional player. Ofcourse getting a opening reportoire together will help a great deal, but that is easier said than done! Thanks for the book references, do you know anything good <on the web> for developing the middle game?
Mar-24-04  ruylopez900: It drives me crazy when people play this! Not only is it drawish (check the stats at the top of the page) but it also side steps my favourite variation! The Dragon! .....or maybe that's why they do it.....
Mar-24-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  refutor: <boardgames> why is 5.a3 prophylactic? what is it protecting against? <ruylopez900> you can still play "the dragon" v. the canal-sokolsky...just play 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.Bb5+ Nc6 and follow it up with ...g6, ...Bg7, ...O-O, ...Bd7 etc. that's the great thing about a dragon setup, you can play it vs. basically any anti-sicilian line
Mar-24-04  ruylopez900: Good Point <refutor> Maybe I was caught up in playing the "book" lines to the Canal. I'll try that out next chance I get!
Mar-27-04  boordgamer: <refutor> it prevents the Anderssen counter attack..B-b4, but he still put it there because of my oversight but then moved it again.
Mar-27-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  refutor: what anderssen counter attack? look at the position 1.e2e4 d7d5 2.e4xd5 d8xd5 3.b1c3 d5a5 4.d2d4 c7c6 5.a2a3 black hadn't even played ...e6 yet so 5.a3 wasn't protecting vs. anything
Mar-27-04  BiLL RobeRTiE: I think the anderssen counter-attack is the not-so-sound Pin Variation 1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 e6 3 d4 cxd4 4 Nxd4 Nf6 5 Nc3 Bb4.
Mar-27-04  boordgamer: Just because ...e6 was not played yet doesent mean it dident have the future intention of preventing the bishop going there. Basically I was expermenting with the computer, taking him out of book lines early on. I have analyzed this move further lately and its really a waste of time losing move.
Mar-27-04  boordgamer: And my bad for posting this opening on the sicilian page,wont happen again.
Nov-07-04  Knight13: I've played this opening many times in the sicilian. But I don't think white has any good moves to respond.
Sep-30-05  rexeterna: Looks like Morozevich is using this opening today against Topalov.
Dec-16-06  hamworld: The Pin Variation is usually a bit unsound. Computers (mine for example) have a little bit of tactical difficulty when playing the second side of The pin Variation, 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 Bb4 6. e5!( I like e5) Qc7? I know this loses but would anyone like to explain why for those who don't know why this move loses?
Jan-02-07  Haeron: Can I just ask, what if Black plays 4. ...Nxd7? I don't see the problem with developing the knight.
Jan-02-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  WannaBe: <Haeron> That is what I usually do, if white wants to trade the light squared bishops, I then usually play my queen out to c7 or, if my b-pawn is pushed, I sometimes move my queen to b6.
Feb-23-07  DMBFan23: All,

I am wondering about the immediate 5. c4 in this line. it seems that 5...Qg4 wins the e-pawn after 6. 0-0 Qxe5, but many say that's not a problem as I can play d3 or d4 with plenty of compensation for the pawn. However, I find that against my chess computers (crafty on a crappy setting, because I'm crappy at chess) I can't make up for the lost pawn. am I playing to hold the draw at that point, or what is my plan?

Feb-23-07  Swapmeet: <DMBFan23> I can't say I know much about that line in particular, but it seems to share a similar tactical idea with the Steinitz variation of the Scotch (1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 exd4 4.Nxd4 Qh4), and that is to threaten a knight fork at c7. This can be done via 7.d4 cxd4 8.Nxd4, followed by Nb5. If black doesn't take on d4, then Nc3 followed by either Nb5 or Nd5. Black is hard pressed to meet this threat, and often will either have to move the king to guard c7 or castle queenside, leaving the black king vulnerable in either case.

Like I said I'm not familiar with this line, so black may have ways around this, but I hope that at least gave you some ideas.

Dec-17-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  WannaBe: I do not like this line for white, it seems to me, after 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. Bb5+ Bd7 4. Bxd7+ Nxd7 white gave up a tempo...
Feb-29-08  Bob726: <Wannabe> The reason most players play Qxd7 rather than Nxd7 is that white can pretty much force Black to play a Hedgehog type position, which most sicilian players don't like to play. If black plays g6 and flanchittos his bishop, than it would be stupid to put the knight on d7, it's much better on c6. If black is comfortable with a Hedgehog type position, Nxd7 is a good choice. Furthermore, it isn't really a lost of a tempo because in the hedgehog/maroczy bind type postions, white often has pawns on b3, c4, e4, and f3, making it a very bad piece, and it would be a good idea to trade it off.
Mar-25-09  rangek: <refutor: you can still play "the dragon" v. the canal-sokolsky...just play 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.Bb5+ Nc6 and follow it up with ...g6, ...Bg7, ...O-O, ...Bd7 etc. that's the great thing about a dragon setup, you can play it vs. basically any anti-sicilian line>

well after Nc6 White will play 4. d4 and transpose into the chekhover variation...so erm no dragon?

Mar-25-09  chessman95: I hate the <Rossolimo>, so I usually play 2...e6, transpose into the Scheveningen, and then tranpose into the Najdorf. Sometimes I just play the Najdorf through the 'normal' line though.
Jan-08-10  Not: Ah, the Love Shack line.
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