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Ruy Lopez, Schliemann Defense (C63)
1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bb5 f5

Number of games in database: 1337
Years covered: 1850 to 2014
Overall record:
   White wins 43.5%
   Black wins 27.1%
   Draws 29.4%

Popularity graph, by decade

Explore this opening  |  Search for sacrifices in this opening.
PRACTITIONERS
With the White Pieces With the Black Pieces
Michael Adams  10 games
Vitaly Tseshkovsky  7 games
Jan Timman  7 games
Frank James Marshall  31 games
Mark Lyell  20 games
Teimour Radjabov  18 games
NOTABLE GAMES [what is this?]
White Wins Black Wins
Fischer vs Matulovic, 1970
Macieja vs Radjabov, 2007
G Marco vs Marshall, 1902
Pillsbury vs Tarrasch, 1903
Bagirov vs Kholmov, 1961
Zeissl vs W Walthoffen, 1898
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 page 1 of 54; games 1-25 of 1,337  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. Mohishunder vs Cochrane 0-120 1850 CalcuttaC63 Ruy Lopez, Schliemann Defense
2. Harrwitz vs Loewenthal 1-029 1853 LondonC63 Ruy Lopez, Schliemann Defense
3. Loewenthal vs Falkbeer  ½-½42 1858 BCA-02.KongressC63 Ruy Lopez, Schliemann Defense
4. F Healey vs J Kling 1-036 1859 LondonC63 Ruy Lopez, Schliemann Defense
5. Hannah vs Falkbeer 1-029 1862 LondonC63 Ruy Lopez, Schliemann Defense
6. P T Duffy vs Steinitz  0-133 1865 LondonC63 Ruy Lopez, Schliemann Defense
7. De Vere vs Bird 1-043 1868 BCA-02.Challenge CupC63 Ruy Lopez, Schliemann Defense
8. Anderssen vs J Minckwitz 1-050 1871 KrefeldC63 Ruy Lopez, Schliemann Defense
9. Anderssen vs C T Goering  1-026 1871 KrefeldC63 Ruy Lopez, Schliemann Defense
10. A Stern vs J Minckwitz  1-030 1871 WiesbadenC63 Ruy Lopez, Schliemann Defense
11. C T Goering vs H Von Minckwitz 0-119 1871 LeipzigC63 Ruy Lopez, Schliemann Defense
12. H Von Schuetz vs F Riemann  0-128 1881 BerlinC63 Ruy Lopez, Schliemann Defense
13. J N Berger vs F Riemann 1-035 1881 BerlinC63 Ruy Lopez, Schliemann Defense
14. M Judd vs Mackenzie 1-035 1881 St Louis mC63 Ruy Lopez, Schliemann Defense
15. D G Baird vs E Delmar 1-045 1889 USA-06.Congress New YorkC63 Ruy Lopez, Schliemann Defense
16. Gossip vs Blackburne 0-122 1890 ManchesterC63 Ruy Lopez, Schliemann Defense
17. Gossip vs Lasker 0-145 1893 New YorkC63 Ruy Lopez, Schliemann Defense
18. Schiffers vs A Khardin 0-126 1894 corrC63 Ruy Lopez, Schliemann Defense
19. Schiffers vs A Khardin 0-124 1895 Samara RUSC63 Ruy Lopez, Schliemann Defense
20. K A Walbrodt vs Teichmann 0-129 1896 NurembergC63 Ruy Lopez, Schliemann Defense
21. Schiffers vs A Khardin 0-130 1897 RUS corrC63 Ruy Lopez, Schliemann Defense
22. G Marco vs Blackburne  ½-½16 1898 ViennaC63 Ruy Lopez, Schliemann Defense
23. Janowski vs H W Trenchard 1-038 1898 ViennaC63 Ruy Lopez, Schliemann Defense
24. K A Walbrodt vs Lipke  1-040 1898 ViennaC63 Ruy Lopez, Schliemann Defense
25. Showalter vs H W Trenchard 1-037 1898 ViennaC63 Ruy Lopez, Schliemann Defense
 page 1 of 54; games 1-25 of 1,337  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  
 

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 6 OF 6 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Apr-04-07  simsim: i played the white side in the following line in a tournament game last week. luckily i was well-prepared :) (i don't play gambits myself, but i recommended the schliemann-gambit to a friend and we analyzed it together)

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 f5 4. Nc3 fxe4 5. Nxe4 d5 6. Nxe5 dxe4 7. Nxc6 Qg5

somehow i think this queen move is not the best, although it is considered to be the mainline (at least in my opening books).

8. Qe2 Nf6 9. f4! Qxf4

10. Nxa7+

nco/khalifman vol.1 gives 10. Ne5+ as the mainline for white and points out that it keeps the queen from the good square d6. i guess black wants to castle long at some point and have a "battery" ready at once.??

10... Bd7 11. Bxd7+ Nxd7 12. d4 Qf5

13. Nb5

now the knight can come back into play with a threat.

13... Bb4+?!

maybe this is black's main opening mistake?

14.c3 Ba5 15. Rf1 Qd5

i think this is already a very difficult position for black.

it seems that black's queen (after 7... Qg5) just loses several tempi (especially after the fun-killer 9.f4! which just forces blacks queen to move and protects g2 - 9...Qc5 10. d4 and the queen has to move again) without achieving much.

how could black have improved?
any input appreciated! (especially from "true gambiteers" :)

here the rest of the game (for sake of completeness): 16. Bf4 O-O-O 17. b4 Bb6 18. a4 Qb3 19. Kf2?! (19. a5 ) Rhf8 20. Kg1 Rxf4 21. Rxf4 c6 22. Nd6+ Kc7 23. Nxe4 Re8 24. Qa2 Qxa2 25. Rxa2 h6 26. h4 Kd8 27. Nd6 Re1+ 28. Kf2 Rc1 29. Rf3 Ne5 30. Nf7+ Nxf7 31. Rxf7 Rxc3 32. Ke2 Rg3 33. Kf1 Rb3 34. a5 Bxd4 35. Rxb7 c5 36. a6 c4 37. a7 Bxa7 38. Raxa7 Kc8 39.Rxg7 Kb8 40. Raf7 1-0

Apr-30-07  simsim: as i was told in another chess forum today:

after
9. f4! Qxf4 10. Nxa7+ Bd7 11. Bxd7+

11... Kxd7! is the best answer
f.e. 12. Qb5+ Ke6 13. Qxb7 Bd6 14. Qb3+ Kd7 = black has compensation


click for larger view

so it seems that 9. Na7 is the best move for white in this variation. after 9... Bd7 10. Bxd7 the move
10... Kxd7? doesn't work because 11.Qb5+ forces the exchange of queens, which leaves black with a lost endgame.

10... Nxd7 11. f4 Qc5 11. Nb5 Qxc2 12. d4 Bb4+ 13. Kf2 was pointed out to be the critical line. after the exchange of queens the endgame is difficult for black.


click for larger view

Apr-30-07  e4Newman: nice research <simsim>

this opening's tricky for white. in my limited experience i once played 9.f4 Qxp 10.d4. pretty wild - double dizzle.

May-04-07  WarmasterKron: Opening of the day for this fine variation. My love affair with early f4/f5 pushes probably started with the Schliemann (though I've played the King's Gambit longer), but I've struggled with it recently.
May-22-07  Silverstrike: Here is a recent game I played with the Schliemann.

White: Robin Taylor
Black: Julius Schwartz
Event: Nairn vs Aberdeen Teachers (North East League Division 1) Date: 22/4/'07
Board: 4/4
White ELO: 1462
Black ELO: 1647

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 f5 4.exf5 e4 5.Qe2 Qe7 6.Bxc6 bxc6 7.Nd4 Qe5 8.Nb3 d5 9.d4 Qxf5 10.Be3 Qg6 11.f3 a5 12.fxe4 Ba6 13.Qf3 0-0-0 14.Qf5+ Qxf5 15.exf5 Re8 16.Kf2 Nf6 17.Kf3 g6 18.Nxa5 gxf5 19.Nxc6 Ng4 20.Ne5 Bd6 21.Bf4 Bxe5 22.Bxe5 Nxe5+ 23.dxe5 Rxe5 24.Na3 Rhe8 25.Rhc1 Re3+ 26.Kf2 Re2+ 27.Kg1 Rg8 28.g3 f4 29.c4 fxg3 30.hxg3 Rxg3+ 31.Kf1 Rxb2 32.Rc2 Bxc4+ 33.Nxc4 Rxc2 34.Ne5 h5 35.Resigns


click for larger view

My bishop on a6 was the main piece in the game, it didn't move for 20 moves but it effectively divided the board in half and forced white's king to remain on the kingside, where it could be attacked. 24...Rhe8 Was another key move, cementing my control of the e-file and enabling me to launch the final assault on white's king.

All comment and criticism is welcome.

Aug-19-07  Bob726: I think 4.d3 gives white a solid advangtage.
Nov-06-07  pawnofdoom: My favorite line of the Ruy Lopez other than the Marshall. The open lines have so much tactics and make the games really interesting and fun to watch
Aug-01-08  Silverstrike: A nice loss of mine in this opening

White: Andrew McClement (1283)
Black: Julius Schwartz (1647)

May the 27th 2007

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 f5 4.d4 fxe4 5.Nxe5 Nxe5 6.dxe5 c6 7.Be2 Qa5+ 8.Nc3 Qxe5 9.0-0 d5 10.Re1 Bd6 11.g3 Qe7 12.Bf3 Bf5 13.Nxd5 cxd5 14.Qxd5 Qe6 15.Rxe4 Qxe4 16.Bxe4 Bxe4 17.Qxe4+ Kd7 18.Qxb7+ Resigns

Andrew was only around 11-12 at the time this game was played, at the moment he is around 13 and rated 1939.

Apr-30-09  FHBradley: Who's Schliemann and when did he play 3... f5?
Apr-30-09  nescio: <FHBradley: Who's Schliemann and when did he play 3... f5?>

He didn't. The move 3...f5 was analyzed by Jšnisch and was also named after him (and still is in Europe as far as I know). Later the move was also mistakenly attributed to Schliemann, probably because of the game Max Lange vs A Schliemann, 1868 (3...Bc5 and 4...f5). Unfortunately the name Schliemann Defence seems to be popular in the English-speaking world.

Apr-30-09  FHBradley: <Nescio> Thanks. You confirmed my vague impression that we have here yet another instance of a wrong attribution.
Apr-30-09  Fanacas: In the netherlands its stil the Janisch gambit. But as far as i now it was already now schliemann defence even in laskers time becous in lasker's manual of chess its called the schlieman defence.
Aug-20-09  jamesjddong: So after 3.f5 what is the best move for white? Nc3 or d3?
Aug-21-09  Where is my mind: 4.Nc3 if your familiar with the Schliemann Defense,otherwise 4.d3 is the safe option.
Aug-01-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  parmetd: How did the Schliemann defense get its name? Does it have any relation to Heinrich Schliemann?
Aug-27-10  rapidcitychess: <parmetd>

<<necio:>He didn't. The move 3...f5 was analyzed by Jšnisch and was also named after him (and still is in Europe as far as I know). Later the move was also mistakenly attributed to Schliemann, probably because of the game Max Lange vs A Schliemann, 1868 (3...Bc5 and 4...f5). Unfortunately the name Schliemann Defence seems to be popular in the English-speaking world.>

That should do in case you didn't already read that.

Aug-27-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eric Schiller: Not exactly. It was analyzed by Jaenisch, who didn't think it was any good. Schliemann was the one who promoted it. Thus Schliemann deserves naming rights, IMHO.

I wrote several books om it BTW.

Aug-27-10  rapidcitychess: <Eric> Oh, I would say it's good for white too, but analysis shows different.

Could you show me a notable Schliemann game in this variation, white or black win?

Aug-27-10  Lil Swine: i've read eric schillers books before
Nov-17-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Marmot PFL: There is a 5 volume work by Shamkovich and Schiller on this opening. I have the 1st two which are priced $9.95 ea and together total 225 pp. Why not just it into one book for $16-18, or all five into two books for $40-44 instead of $50 for five separate books? They don't need to be so thin. I will admit that many Batsford books of only 175-195 pp. cost twice as much, and they say they have to leave things out to meet publishers requests.
Nov-17-10  Everett: Radjabov is the newest champion. Here's an oldie but goodie;

Smyslov vs Bronstein, 1962

Dec-11-11  Penguincw: Opening of the Day

Ruy Lopez, Schliemann Defense
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 f5


click for larger view

Dec-11-11  karnak64: Yeah, opening of the day, and I'm surprised to see one of my game collections wrapped up in the Opening Explorer (Gert Jan Timmerman playing the Schliemann).

I wish I had the moxie to play this opening regularly. But I don't, so I don't in games that count. But it is fun in skittles.

Dec-28-12  Kikoman: <Opening of the Day>

Ruy Lopez, Schliemann Defense (c63)

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 f5


click for larger view

Dec-10-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  MarkFinan: The old Dickyhoff variation, a favourite of Mrs Bobitt! 😄
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