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Queen's Gambit Declined, Exchange, Positional line, 6.Qc2 (D36)
1 d4 d5 2 c4 e6 3 Nc3 Nf6 4 cxd5 exd5 5 Bg5 c6 6 Qc2

Number of games in database: 496
Years covered: 1930 to 2017
Overall record:
   White wins 41.9%
   Black wins 18.3%
   Draws 39.7%

Popularity graph, by decade

Explore this opening  |  Search for sacrifices in this opening.
PRACTITIONERS
With the White Pieces With the Black Pieces
Varuzhan Akobian  5 games
Garry Kasparov  5 games
Radoslaw Wojtaszek  4 games
Vladimir Kramnik  6 games
Dibyendu Barua  5 games
Ulf Andersson  5 games
NOTABLE GAMES [what is this?]
White Wins Black Wins
Kasparov vs Ulf Andersson, 1988
Karpov vs Yusupov, 1988
Bacrot vs S Azarov, 1992
Sliwa vs Fischer, 1962
L Schmitt vs Rellstab, 1937
Furman vs Kan, 1955
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 page 1 of 20; games 1-25 of 496  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. Rubinstein vs Weenink 0-1321930LiegeD36 Queen's Gambit Declined, Exchange, Positional line, 6.Qc2
2. Alekhine vs H B Gledhill 1-0331933Simul, 37bD36 Queen's Gambit Declined, Exchange, Positional line, 6.Qc2
3. Flohr vs A Asgeirsson  1-0241933OlympiadD36 Queen's Gambit Declined, Exchange, Positional line, 6.Qc2
4. L Schmitt vs Rellstab 0-1501937GER-ch 4thD36 Queen's Gambit Declined, Exchange, Positional line, 6.Qc2
5. H R Morris vs M Bain  ½-½381939Ventnor CityD36 Queen's Gambit Declined, Exchange, Positional line, 6.Qc2
6. K S Ojanen vs Ujtelky  ½-½581949Reti MemorialD36 Queen's Gambit Declined, Exchange, Positional line, 6.Qc2
7. Reshevsky vs Guimard 1-0271951Wertheim MemorialD36 Queen's Gambit Declined, Exchange, Positional line, 6.Qc2
8. Kotov vs M Yudovich Sr.  ½-½361952RUSD36 Queen's Gambit Declined, Exchange, Positional line, 6.Qc2
9. Polugaevsky vs I Veltmander  1-0361954URS-ch sfD36 Queen's Gambit Declined, Exchange, Positional line, 6.Qc2
10. V Zurakhov vs Zamikhovsky 1-0611954URS-ch sfD36 Queen's Gambit Declined, Exchange, Positional line, 6.Qc2
11. Ujtelky vs R Bobekov  1-0571954Amsterdam ol (Men) fin-AD36 Queen's Gambit Declined, Exchange, Positional line, 6.Qc2
12. Ujtelky vs J Sefc  ½-½261955CSR-54ch playoff 3rd placeD36 Queen's Gambit Declined, Exchange, Positional line, 6.Qc2
13. Portisch vs F Csiszar  1-0481955Voros LobogoD36 Queen's Gambit Declined, Exchange, Positional line, 6.Qc2
14. Taimanov vs Averbakh ½-½311955USSR ChampionshipD36 Queen's Gambit Declined, Exchange, Positional line, 6.Qc2
15. Furman vs Kan 0-1401955USSR ChampionshipD36 Queen's Gambit Declined, Exchange, Positional line, 6.Qc2
16. Portisch vs L Hallstrom  ½-½331955Wch U20 final-AD36 Queen's Gambit Declined, Exchange, Positional line, 6.Qc2
17. S Khalilbeili vs Chukaev 1-0341956Tbilisi f-USSR chD36 Queen's Gambit Declined, Exchange, Positional line, 6.Qc2
18. Spassky vs Szabo  ½-½591956Amsterdam CandidatesD36 Queen's Gambit Declined, Exchange, Positional line, 6.Qc2
19. Pachman vs J Sefc  ½-½361956Marianske Lazne/PrahaD36 Queen's Gambit Declined, Exchange, Positional line, 6.Qc2
20. M Joffe vs W Balcarek  1-0721956Moscow ol (Men) fin-BD36 Queen's Gambit Declined, Exchange, Positional line, 6.Qc2
21. N Padevsky vs Stahlberg  ½-½201956Alekhine MemorialD36 Queen's Gambit Declined, Exchange, Positional line, 6.Qc2
22. W Golz vs J Rejfir  0-1391957GDR-CSRD36 Queen's Gambit Declined, Exchange, Positional line, 6.Qc2
23. Reshevsky vs Szabo ½-½861957DallasD36 Queen's Gambit Declined, Exchange, Positional line, 6.Qc2
24. Lombardy vs J Sumar  1-0631958Mar del PlataD36 Queen's Gambit Declined, Exchange, Positional line, 6.Qc2
25. I Jonsson vs K Honfi  ½-½16195813th olm final BD36 Queen's Gambit Declined, Exchange, Positional line, 6.Qc2
 page 1 of 20; games 1-25 of 496  PGN Download
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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Aug-29-05  themindset: this is the source of many a boring game.
Sep-29-05  jdlasmarias: hi everyone! is there anyone here who uses this opening as part of their repertoire? Which is stronger,white castles queenside and attack kingside or castle kingside and attack queenside with the minority attack? BTW,i don't think this is a boring opening..how can you say that when even Garry Kasparov plays it,right? :)
Sep-29-05  euripides: <jdlas> I have used this a lot in blitz but have limited experience in slower games. The fun is to keep the opponent guesing which you'll do. Then you convince yourself you have a subtle reason for taking one decision rather than another. If you're Botvinnik, you're probably right.

Often the best thing is to castle K-side and play f3 and e4, but the minority attack and the Q-side castling followed by K-sde pawn storm are both good altenatives. However, Q-side castling can be risky. Look what happened to Polgar yesterday.

Sep-29-05  jdlasmarias: thanks for the input..i have tried experimenting with this a long time ago,but i stopped..i can't remember why..hehe maybe im still in the stage of trying openings out,so to speak..BTW what happened to polgar?Judith right?is this part of her repertoire?
Sep-29-05  euripides: Judit Polgar vs Anand, 2005 Not the same opening, but a similar structure.
Sep-29-05  euripides: For a great positional game by Black in this line (not included under this opening but basically the same) see Portisch vs Kasparov, 1989
Nov-07-05  who: Actually that game is very different. The early Nf3 prevents the f3 e4 push which is the main reason this opening is great for white. In that game it is black who develops a king side attack.
Nov-08-05  who: <Sponge: I'd say 124 games isn't enough to really decide how good the opening really enough to decide how good or bad the opening is for either side.> well actually after 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.cxd5 exd5 5.Bg5 c6 6.e3 Qc2 gets played a bunch so it transposes into this variation.
Sep-07-06  soughzin: Does anyone have a link for some info or games on a kingside goal for white in this opening? I was told there are two plans in the exchange, the minority attack and queenside play or kingside play/attack, but so far I can only find info on the minority attack.
Sep-07-06  RookFile: White seems to have a healthy winning percentage in this line.
Sep-07-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  KingG: <soughzin> Kasparov vs Ulf Andersson, 1988
Sep-07-06  soughzin: Thanks king, find me on msn soon and I'll talk your ear off on some d4 stuff again(at least I have new material though) : )
Apr-13-07  gambitfan: http://www.playchess.de/games/HCL-T...
Apr-13-07  gambitfan: Opening Explorer
Jun-09-07  Open Defence: hmmm but in that line can't Black play 7..Bf5 ? Opening Explorer
Mar-12-09  WeakSquare: Black can avoid the exchange variation if he wants. He can play:

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 d5, or

1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Be7.

This way White is forced to play early Nf3 and so Black has time to play Bf5.

Look at these games:

Bobotsov vs Petrosian, 1968

Portisch vs Kasparov, 1989

Mar-12-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  KingG: <WeakSquare> <1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Be7.

This way White is forced to play early Nf3 and so Black has time to play Bf5.>

White still has 4.cxd5 exd5 5.Bf4.

Mar-14-09  WeakSquare: <KingG> Okay, that's different. That's Alatortsev variation. It is not the best version of the Ex variation. At least Black is not getting bulldozed as in Botvinnik vs Keres, 1952
Mar-15-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  KingG: <WeakSquare> <That's Alatortsev variation. It is not the best version of the Ex variation.> My feeling is also that it's not as good as the normal Exchange Variation, but in that case why do GMs not just play 3...Be7 instead of 3...Nf6? As far as I know the majority still prefer 3...Nf6.

The Alatortsev is still quite a dangerous weapon in any case, regardless of whether it's as good as the Karlsbad variation, and it's not the type of thing you want to go into unprepared.

Mar-16-09  WeakSquare: <KingG> I am talking about this position: 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Nf6.

This is the only position that allows the real exchange variation (without Bf5), and you will rarely see it (at the top, at least)

Look at the world championship matches from Spassky-Petrosian onwards. The only time it was played was Korchnoi-Karpov 1978 (#31), and Korchnoi played the exchange (and won).

The most common move order is 1.d4 nf6 2.c4 e6 3.nf3 d5, and once white plays early Nf3, he doesn't have the big daddy exchange var.

Mar-16-09  WeakSquare: <KingG> Alatortsev is lots of fun, but more double-edged. In the Bg5 exchange White has an easy positional advantage and a ready made plan (minority attack). In the Alatortsev, Black can have a little fun of his own.

I like Alatortsev more, though. It can result in very exotic positions, quite unlike other QGD lines.

Mar-16-09  WeakSquare: Actually, White has an even better performance in Alatortsev, according to chessgames. Hmm....

Maybe some Black players are not prepared. They think their problems are solved by Be7 and don't know what to do afterwards. Very interesting.

Maybe Black should always play 1...Nf6.

Mar-16-09  WeakSquare: Hey KingG, how does this game end?

Kasparov vs Ulf Andersson, 1988

Why did Ulf resign?

Jun-21-09  YuanTi: Ulf can't keep the Bishop on the Queening Diagonal (b7 is the only safe square, and won't stay that way), so he'll have to trade his knight for the queen, after which Kasparov will have no trouble winning.
Feb-01-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: Opening of the Day

Queen's Gambit Declined, Exchange, Positional line, 6.Qc2 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.♘c3 ♘f6 4.cxd5 exd5 5.♗g5 c6 6.♕c2


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