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Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation (D38)
1 d4 d5 2 c4 e6 3 Nc3 Nf6 4 Nf3 Bb4

Number of games in database: 2924
Years covered: 1889 to 2017
Overall record:
   White wins 32.3%
   Black wins 22.8%
   Draws 44.9%

Popularity graph, by decade

Explore this opening  |  Search for sacrifices in this opening.
PRACTITIONERS
With the White Pieces With the Black Pieces
Alexey Dreev  22 games
Pia Cramling  21 games
Loek van Wely  20 games
Aleksej Aleksandrov  74 games
Yifan Hou  50 games
Gennady Sosonko  49 games
NOTABLE GAMES [what is this?]
White Wins Black Wins
Khalifman vs Serper, 1994
F Olafsson vs Fischer, 1958
Carlsen vs Aronian, 2015
O Bazan vs Fischer, 1960
V Laznicka vs Mamedyarov, 2009
Alekhine vs A Love, 1923
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 page 1 of 117; games 1-25 of 2,924  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. Blackburne vs Gossip 1-0381889USA-06.Congress New YorkD38 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation
2. Duras vs J Zeman  ½-½311906Prague simD38 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation
3. O Bernstein vs N Pavlov-Pianov 1-0251911Moscow City ChampionshipD38 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation
4. Marshall vs Schlechter ½-½851911KarlsbadD38 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation
5. B Rask vs A Pritzel  1-0581916Nordic Congress-B 7thD38 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation
6. Alekhine vs Zajicek 1-0391922Blindfold simul, 12bD38 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation
7. Ed. Lasker vs Marshall  ½-½631923Marshall - Ed Lasker US ChampionshipD38 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation
8. Kupchik vs Marshall 0-13419239th American Chess CongressD38 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation
9. M A Schapiro vs Marshall  ½-½5919239th American Chess CongressD38 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation
10. Alekhine vs A Love 0-1371923Simul, 24bD38 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation
11. Capablanca vs Marshall ½-½461924New YorkD38 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation
12. Carlos Torre vs Marshall  ½-½711925MarienbadD38 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation
13. Gruenfeld vs Marshall ½-½261925MarienbadD38 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation
14. W Michel vs Alekhine 1-0321925Clock simul, 10bD38 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation
15. S Gotthilf vs Levenfish  ½-½351925MoscowD38 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation
16. Colle vs Alekhine 0-1291925Hastings 1925/26D38 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation
17. Maroczy vs O Tenner 0-1191926New YorkD38 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation
18. Alekhine vs J Piacentini 1-0331926Buenos AiresD38 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation
19. W Winter vs H H Hahlbohm  1-0331926Chicago-London cable mD38 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation
20. S Kalabar vs S Rosselli del Turco 1-02219271st olm finalD38 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation
21. M Monticelli vs Marshall 0-1271931PrahaD38 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation
22. Santasiere vs Marshall 1-0841931Masters TournamentD38 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation
23. H Steiner vs Marshall  ½-½681931Masters TournamentD38 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation
24. E Mulder vs J van den Bosch 0-1421933NED-chD38 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation
25. S Von Freymann vs Ragozin  0-1451934USSR Championship 1934/35D38 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation
 page 1 of 117; games 1-25 of 2,924  PGN Download
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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Sep-13-04  Woodpusher: According to the Opening Explorer the critical line is 1. d4 d5   2. c4 e6   3. Nc3 Nf6   4. Nf3 Bb4   5. cxd5 exd5   6. Bg5 Nbd7   7. e3 c5   8. Bd3 Qa5   9. Qc2 c4   10. Bf5 O-O   11. O-O Re8   12. Nd2! (other moves seem to lose the advantage) and white fairs very well statistically.
Sep-13-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  refutor: <dudley> why? there's more to getting ideas, etc. about an opening than the most popular line in the opening explorer.
Oct-27-04  suenteus po 147: I'm with <refutor> on this one. The cold and icy opening explorer can give me statistics, but my fellow chess players may be more inclined to share opening philosophy or intentions behind a line that make it easier to understand and implement in my own play.
Oct-27-04  Dudley: <suenteus po 147> I recently purchased "Play d4" by Palliser, and in his version of the QG for white, he delays the move Nc3. For example, 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Bg5 Be7 5.Nc3. An early Bb4+ is met by Nbd2 rather than Nc3. Another line is 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 c6 4.Bg5!?. In the Slav or Semi-Slav, he recommends an eventual Nbd2 instead of Nc3 and avoids all of the Slavish counterattacks-Meran, Notebloom, etc. The emphasis is on playbable lines that give white at least a slight plus but are not very theoretical (drawish?). I like it because all of the lines for white involve an early Nf3 which fits in with other lines I play such as the Torre attack.
Oct-27-04  Dudley: By the way, ignore my earlier post about using the opening explorer- I was peeved about something.
Oct-27-04  suenteus po 147: <Dudley> No worries. I'm actually thankful for your earlier post on the 5.cxd5 lines and the ideas behind them. It turned out to create some interesting problems for my opponents.
Nov-05-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sneaky: Can't decide whether to play the Queen's Gambit Declined, or the Nimzo Indian? Try the Ragozin combo sampler!
Feb-13-05  Helloween: How not to play the Ragozin:
Helloween - Pachu
20 minutes/game

1.c4 Nf6 2.Nc3 e6 3.Nf3 d5 4.d4 Bb4 5.Bg5 O-O?! 6.e3 h6 7.Bh4 c6 8.cxd5 cxd5? 9.Rc1 Nc6?! 10.Ne5 g5? 11.Nxc6 bxc6 12.Bg3 Ne4 13.Bd3 Qa5 14.Qh5! Kg7 15.Bxe4 dxe4 16.h4 gxh4 17.Be5+! f6 18.Rxh4 fxe5 19.dxe5! Rh8 20.Rg4+ Kf8 21.Rf4+ Ke7 22.Qf7+ Kd8 23.Rd1+ 1-0

Apr-19-05  Strategic Joker: After 6..h6 Bxf6 is better when the quuen takes the Nb8 wont have a good life as it would should black have played Nbd7 on f6
Apr-19-05  dragon40: <dudley> I have that book and like it alot..I dont use alot of what he recommends, but as a D4 player, it comes in very handy! I like to use the following against the Ragozin Variation: 5. Qa4+, Nc6( forced, and keeps BLack from being able to play ...c5 anytime soon.) After that, you can usually follow up with 6.a3 to force that dark square bishop to declare its intentions:) You get into 2 distinctly different positions here depending on if Black plays 6...Bxc3+ or 6...Be7. I could give a ton of variations, but would rather limit it to specifics here. I like the Queen check mainly becasue it stops black from getting in ...c5 early and can casue a few problems because of it. Anyone else ever use this line and if so, what is your opinion or what is your opinion even if you do not play it?
Apr-19-05  Dudley: <dragon 40> The book is really almost too detailed for me to assimilate but it looks very good as a reference. I like it because I also play the Colle system and all the recommended lines involve an early Nf3 like the Colle. This means I can use the same lines when I have to transpose out of the Colle system into a QGD line. I like your recommendation vs. the Ragosin, which seems annoying for White. There aren't a lot of good QGD books for White, it's just too big of a subject.
Apr-19-05  dragon40: <dudley> If you want a decent (in my opinion) book on the OGD go with Sadler's <Queen's Gambit Declined> published by Everyman. It covers many of the main lines of the opening and Sadler is a very good annotator and gives quite a few good ideas. I think you might like it, it is well worth the purchase. I have used a couple of Palliser's recommendations against the Dutch and Modern, cuts way back on the theroy there, and I do like a few of the other variatons as well although, as you said, it is a bit thick in places :)
Apr-19-05  Helloween: <dragon40> I've played both sides of the 5.Qa4+ variation. It's more fun than critical, as Black can generally get very quick development and equal chances. Things can get interesting in 6.Ne5, though: 5.Qa4+ Nc6 6.Ne5 O-O! 7.Nxc6 Bxc3+ 8.bxc3 bxc6 9.Bg5(or 9.Qxc6 Bd7 10.Qa6 Ne4 with good compensation)9...Bd7 10.Qa5 Qb8! 11.Bxf6 gxf6 followed by 12...Qb6 with equality.
Apr-20-05  dragon40: <helloween> That is a cute variation you give, though I have never tried it..I might:) I only play the Ragozin from the White side, as the QGD is not in my repetoire for the black pieces versus the D pawn. I much prefer a Grunfeld or Slav with an occasional Benko Gambit for fun and excitement ;)
Apr-20-05  Helloween: <dragon40>The QGD is not usually in my repetoire, either, as I play QID and Nimzo defences, but I do transpose into the Ragozin against the Kasparov Nimzo-Indian: 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.Nf3 then 4...d5 and we have the Ragozin.
Apr-20-05  dragon40: <helloween> That is a good trasposition, as it keeps your repetoire tight and you keep variatons and the openings to what you know, understand and are comfortable with. I think the Ragozin system is a nice system for Black to play, since it does offer a few more chances and can catch white offguard if he is not careful. It is not quite as "booked" as lots of the other Queen's Gambit Declined variations and suits a counter-attacking, enterprising style of a playeer that might not otherwise find the QGD attractive to play.
Feb-04-06  DutchDunce: Hats off to Aronian for uncorking the Ragozin at Corus, scoring a draw. The traditional e6-variety of the QGD is an utter rarity at the top these days.
Feb-11-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  Calli: Marshall championed this line in twenties, but somehow didn't get credit for his work. The Ragozin? Must have have easy for him after all those Marshall games.
Aug-06-06  Wilson H. L.: Well, there's already a "Marshall Defense" in the QGD. [1. d4 d5 2. c4 Nf6]
Aug-06-06  Albertan: Nadezhda Kosintseva defeated Woman's World Champion Zhu Chen using the Razogin:

Zhu Chen vs N Kosintseva, 2006

Apr-25-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Dr. Funkenstein: In this line, which is a Ragozin by transposition that I have faced, 1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 Bb4 5. Nf3 h6, is it better to exchange the bishop on f6 or try to keep the pin (or force a premature g5) with Bh4?
Mar-04-10  rapidcitychess: My lines against the Q pawn openings are: Gruenfeld, QGD, Ragozin, Slav, Benoni, Nimzo-Indian, QID, KID. Of course I still have a question for those that can help a wimpy class C player. How does one play against the Neo Gruenfeld.


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Mar-04-10  Professor Chaos: <My lines against the Q pawn openings are: Gruenfeld, QGD, Ragozin, Slav, Benoni, Nimzo-Indian, QID, KID.>

Why do you play all of those? You could probably be fine with just Slav/Nimzo/QID right?

Mar-04-10  rapidcitychess: True, these are solid defenses. BUT, I love playing the Gruenfeld due to the powerful g7 bishop. To shorten the list by popularity: Gruenfeld, Nimzo, QID, Slav, QGD. STILL, I need to know how to beat the neo Gruenfels. i understand that you can transpose to the Saemisch, but I do not like the KID.
Jan-05-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: Opening of the Day

Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation
1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.♘c3 ♘f6 4.♘f3 ♗b4


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