chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox, Rubinstein Attack (D61)
1 d4 d5 2 c4 e6 3 Nc3 Nf6 4 Bg5 Be7 5 e3 O-O 6 Nf3 Nbd7
7 Qc2

Number of games in database: 532
Years covered: 1900 to 2014
Overall record:
   White wins 48.9%
   Black wins 17.3%
   Draws 33.8%

Popularity graph, by decade

Explore this opening  |  Search for sacrifices in this opening.
PRACTITIONERS
With the White Pieces With the Black Pieces
Frank James Marshall  12 games
Alexander Alekhine  10 games
Anthony Miles  9 games
Akiba Rubinstein  7 games
Richard Teichmann  7 games
Ulf Andersson  6 games
NOTABLE GAMES [what is this?]
White Wins Black Wins
Alekhine vs Yates, 1910
Rubinstein vs Teichmann, 1908
Maroczy vs H Suechting, 1905
Lasker vs Capablanca, 1921
Kashdan vs Rubinstein, 1931
Dus Chotimirsky vs Rubinstein, 1907
<< previous chapter next chapter >>

 page 1 of 22; games 1-25 of 532  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. Lasker vs E O Jones 0-124 1900 GBR tour simD61 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox, Rubinstein Attack
2. Marshall vs Maroczy  ½-½43 1905 Barmen Meisterturnier AD61 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox, Rubinstein Attack
3. Maroczy vs H Suechting 1-048 1905 Barmen Meisterturnier AD61 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox, Rubinstein Attack
4. Marshall vs Schlechter 1-021 1905 Barmen Meisterturnier AD61 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox, Rubinstein Attack
5. Von Bardeleben vs H Wolf  ½-½59 1905 Barmen Meisterturnier AD61 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox, Rubinstein Attack
6. B Leussen vs A H Pettersson  1-017 1905 Barmen Meisterturnier BD61 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox, Rubinstein Attack
7. B Leussen vs A E Post  1-031 1905 Barmen Meisterturnier BD61 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox, Rubinstein Attack
8. R K Kieseritsky vs Gajdos  1-053 1905 Barmen Main A, GERD61 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox, Rubinstein Attack
9. F Benima vs Rubinstein 0-131 1905 Barmen Main A, GERD61 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox, Rubinstein Attack
10. F Benima vs R K Kieseritsky 0-137 1905 Barmen Main A, GERD61 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox, Rubinstein Attack
11. Marshall vs Tarrasch 0-162 1905 OstendD61 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox, Rubinstein Attack
12. Marshall vs G Schories  1-028 1905 ScheveningenD61 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox, Rubinstein Attack
13. Marshall vs J W te Kolste  1-029 1905 ScheveningenD61 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox, Rubinstein Attack
14. Schlechter vs Burn 1-027 1906 OstendeD61 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox, Rubinstein Attack
15. Marshall vs Rubinstein 0-143 1906 OstendD61 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox, Rubinstein Attack
16. Marshall vs Spielmann 1-055 1906 15th DSB Kongress (Nuremberg)D61 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox, Rubinstein Attack
17. Marshall vs Leonhardt  1-049 1906 15th DSB Kongress (Nuremberg)D61 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox, Rubinstein Attack
18. Schlechter vs Teichmann 0-133 1906 OstendD61 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox, Rubinstein Attack
19. Schlechter vs G Marco 1-025 1906 StockholmD61 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox, Rubinstein Attack
20. Schlechter vs S O Svensson 1-041 1906 StockholmD61 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox, Rubinstein Attack
21. L Forgacs vs W Gattie  1-031 1906 Ostende, TournamentD61 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox, Rubinstein Attack
22. Rubinstein vs Teichmann 1-023 1907 KarlsbadD61 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox, Rubinstein Attack
23. Marshall vs Janowski  0-158 1907 KarlsbadD61 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox, Rubinstein Attack
24. Dus Chotimirsky vs Rubinstein 0-155 1907 LodzD61 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox, Rubinstein Attack
25. Teichmann vs Rubinstein 1-070 1907 OstendeD61 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox, Rubinstein Attack
 page 1 of 22; games 1-25 of 532  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  
 

from the Chessgames Store

Kibitzer's Corner
Jan-15-04  Whitehat1963: Marshall appears to be the first to employ this attack, and in fact, he uses it against Rubinstein himself before Rubinstein uses it as white (at least according to the database). Why isn't it called the "Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox Defense, Marshall Attack" instead? (By the way, while this has lost popularity, it has enjoyed great superiority for white.) But what I really want to know is how did it get it's name? Marshall used it first and more often.
Jan-15-04  BiLL RobeRTiE: The database is incomplete; maybe Rubinstein used it before Marshall or popularized it. I would say that this is seen less commonly because the Orthodox Defense is so rarely employed nowadays.
Jan-26-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sneaky: I just played this game, I'm kind of proud of my attack. The moves came very naturally.

[Event "ChessAnyTime/AjedrezOnline rated blitz game"] [Date "2004.01.27"]
[Time "04:31:22"]
[White "Sneaky"]
[Black "poupou"]
[WhiteElo "1704"]
[BlackElo "1966"]
[ECO "D53"]
[TimeControl "300+0"]
[Result "1-0"]

1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 Be7 5. e3 O-O 6. Qc2 h6 7. h4 Nbd7 8. Nf3 c5 9. O-O-O Qa5 10. Kb1 dxc4 11. Bxc4 a6 12. Bxf6 Nxf6 13. Ng5 cxd4 14. Rxd4 b5 15. Nce4 g6 16. Bxe6 Bxe6 17. Nxe6 Rac8 18. Qd3 Nxe4 19. Qxe4 Bf6 20. Nxf8 Bxd4 21. Nxg6 fxg6 22. Qxg6+ Kh8 23. Qxh6+ Kg8 24. Qe6+ Kg7 25. Qd7+ Kf6 26. Qxd4+ Ke7 27. Qg7+ Ke8 28. Qg8+ Ke7 29. Qxc8 Qd2 30. Rc1 Qd3+ 31. Qc2 <Black resigned 1-0>

Jan-26-04  fred lennox: <sneaky> Wow! That's quite a crush. Looks like your rating will go up. Good going. Just wondering, do you have a favorite d4 player?
Jan-27-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sneaky: Thanks, I like the 1.d4 as practiced by Kasparov (esp. in the 80's), Najdorf, Tal, and of course Rubinstein.

Looking over that game again I think I was probably lost at some point, but oh well...it's just 5 minute chess.

Feb-03-05  Open Defence: Per the database the last Black win against the Rubenstein came in 2001! J M Bellon Lopez vs Y Gonzalez is that correct ?
Feb-03-05  InfinityCircuit: There's also A Shalamberidze vs T L Petrosian, 2001 but that might be later in 2001.
Jan-26-06  EricCartman: I play this over, over and over again. There's just no way of losing to black if you play this opening.

You get such an incredible attack and your pawnsturctre is so strong, the winning percentage with the white pieces is 48%. Enough said.

Jul-27-06  siggemannen: i guess this is why ppl play the tartakower-makogonov-bondarevsky system. you can't get the same attacking momento there as black already played h6 protecting the weak h7-square. also the long-castle in tartakower is while being tricky can turn the tables against white even.
Feb-04-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  refutor: are there any books out there on this line?
Feb-04-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eric Schiller: <refutor> Several books are out there, including one of mine which should be available at a low price. In fact, most QGD books cover it.
Feb-04-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  refutor: Thanks Eric! I really enjoyed your book with Shamkovich on the Tarrasch Defense...what is the book called?
Feb-04-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eric Schiller: <refutor> Orthodox Variation, Queen's Gambit Declined. ISBN 0931462347. $6.50 list, probably cheaper online.
May-18-07  Knight13: Holy crap Black barely wins and White's killing black like crazy.
Dec-25-11  Penguincw: Opening of the Day

Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox Defense, Rubinstein Attack

1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Bg5 Be7 5. e3 O-O 6.Nf3 Nbd7 7.Qc2


click for larger view

Jul-05-12  Wyatt Gwyon: Not exactly the best stats for black.
Jul-05-12  RookFile: Exactly. This is what Fischer understood. Play some stodgy defense like this, and you simply are not going to put as many points up on the board as you will by playing sharp, double edged stuff with black.
Jul-05-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Shams: <This is what Fischer understood.> And about a million other people, before and after him.
Jul-06-12  RookFile: Actually, not. The Russians, of course, understood the need for sharp stuff before Fischer. Bronstein played some wonderful games with the KID, for example, and Mikhail Tal needs no introduction. But really, most top players played to make a draw with black (as Karpov did later) - Capa, Lasker, Euwe, etc. Fischer himself said that the turning point in his entire career was when he realized black should play for a win, not a draw. That was certainly not the conventional wisdom of win with white, draw with black.

It is true that from the time of Kasparov onwards, there was a renewed acceptance of the risky doubled edged black defenses that Fischer pioneered. The poisoned pawn Sicilian is one example.

Jul-06-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Shams: Can't you see that your next to your initial assertion, your post confuses the choice of what to play, with the knowledge of the consequences of that choice? The Fischer comment you relate was only an epiphany in a personal, competitive sense, it wasn't a new insight into the game. It's Fischer telling himself that he can win with either color, nothing more.
Jul-07-12  RookFile: Well, take Reshevsky as an example, who was Fischer's chief competition in the US. Win with white, draw with black. Ideal for matches, not as good for tournaments. If you read Bronstein's Zurich 1953 you'll see Bronstein criticizing Reshevsky over this very point. He's less direct about it, but I believe that Bronstein is indeed making the very point that with black you should be playing sharp stuff and going for the win.

Along these lines, I remember an interview Reshevsky gave late in life, and he said he thought Fischer was a little too loose with the black pieces. I'm afraid that for all his strength, Reshevsky never quite got Bronstein's point on this matter.

So, Fischer wasn't the first to eschew the Orthodox, and there were guys after him. However, millions may be a bit of an overstatement. Make a long story short, while Fischer hated to lose, he wasn't afraid to, and took chances in accordance with a competitive belief (as opposed to chess played by computers) that the most intelligent thing to do with black is to double down and go all out for the win.

This was actually an interesting idea to think through.

Jul-18-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: Even before the postwar years and the seminal contibutions made by Geller, Bronstein and Boleslavsky to the theory and practice of the King's Indian as Black, there was a trend towards playing openings other than the Classical QGD. All but two games at Buenos Aires 1927 in that opening? Ugh!

Aron Nimzowitsch often played his beloved Nimzo-Indian and others followed his example from the thirties onwards, plus a more active form of QGD, the Slav, became popular indeed-by AVRO 1938, all the top players were giving it a try.

NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, totally anonymous, and 100% free--plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, or duplicating posts.
  3. No personal attacks against other users.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform an administrator.


NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific opening and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, you might try the Kibitzer's Café.
Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors.


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | advertising | contact us
Copyright 2001-2014, Chessgames Services LLC
Web design & database development by 20/20 Technologies