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Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox Defense, Bd3 line (D67)
1 d4 d5 2 c4 e6 3 Nc3 Nf6 4 Bg5 Be7 5 e3 O-O 6 Nf3 Nbd7
7 Rc1 c6 8 Bd3 dxc4 9 Bxc4 Nd5

Number of games in database: 259
Years covered: 1887 to 2014
Overall record:
   White wins 37.5%
   Black wins 11.6%
   Draws 51.0%

Popularity graph, by decade

Explore this opening  |  Search for sacrifices in this opening.
PRACTITIONERS
With the White Pieces With the Black Pieces
Alexander Alekhine  19 games
Ernst Gruenfeld  8 games
Max Euwe  6 games
Jose Raul Capablanca  10 games
Geza Maroczy  6 games
Hans Ree  4 games
NOTABLE GAMES [what is this?]
White Wins Black Wins
Alekhine vs Lasker, 1934
Rubinstein vs Schlechter, 1909
Capablanca vs H Steiner, 1928
Euwe vs Vidmar, 1922
Fine vs H Steiner, 1932
Lear vs Carlos Torre, 1924
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 page 1 of 11; games 1-25 of 259  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. Zukertort vs Schiffers 0-145 1887 05.DSB-KongressD67 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox Defense, Bd3 line
2. Steinitz vs Lasker ½-½61 1894 Lasker - Steinitz World ChampionshipD67 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox Defense, Bd3 line
3. Tarrasch vs Teichmann 1-043 1896 NurembergD67 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox Defense, Bd3 line
4. Marshall vs Showalter  0-133 1900 hexD67 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox Defense, Bd3 line
5. Swiderski vs W Cohn 0-132 1902 13th DSB Kongress (Hanover)D67 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox Defense, Bd3 line
6. Janowski vs J Mortimer  1-062 1902 Monte CarloD67 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox Defense, Bd3 line
7. O Roething vs Lasker  ½-½71 1902 USA tour simD67 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox Defense, Bd3 line
8. Janowski vs M Porges  0-145 1902 PragueD67 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox Defense, Bd3 line
9. Schlechter vs Showalter  ½-½38 1904 Cambridge SpringsD67 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox Defense, Bd3 line
10. Marshall vs Janowski  1-057 1905 Janowski - Marshall, Match 2D67 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox Defense, Bd3 line
11. T Sika vs Duras 0-134 1905 UJCS-1.KongressD67 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox Defense, Bd3 line
12. Rubinstein vs Schlechter 1-059 1909 St PetersburgD67 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox Defense, Bd3 line
13. E Shrader vs E Schrader  1-034 1910 Western ChampionshipD67 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox Defense, Bd3 line
14. Marshall vs M Lowcki  1-026 1912 18th DSB KongressD67 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox Defense, Bd3 line
15. H H Hahlbohm vs Showalter  1-034 1916 Western ChampionshipD67 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox Defense, Bd3 line
16. B Kostic vs F K Perkins  1-036 1916 Rice MemorialD67 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox Defense, Bd3 line
17. M Marchand vs H E Price  1-035 1920 BromleyD67 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox Defense, Bd3 line
18. M Marchand vs G A Thomas  ½-½29 1920 BromleyD67 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox Defense, Bd3 line
19. K Sterk vs B Kostic  ½-½36 1921 BudapestD67 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox Defense, Bd3 line
20. W Schelfhout vs J W te Kolste 0-152 1921 NED-chD67 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox Defense, Bd3 line
21. Hromadka vs Prokes  0-167 1921 BrnoD67 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox Defense, Bd3 line
22. N Whitaker vs Factor  1-046 1921 8th American Chess CongressD67 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox Defense, Bd3 line
23. Alekhine vs A Selezniev 1-033 1922 Bad PistyanD67 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox Defense, Bd3 line
24. Reti vs Prokes  ½-½39 1922 Bad PistyanD67 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox Defense, Bd3 line
25. A Selezniev vs Prokes ½-½34 1922 Bad PistyanD67 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox Defense, Bd3 line
 page 1 of 11; games 1-25 of 259  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  
 

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Kibitzer's Corner
Dec-02-04  EnglishOpeningc4: HAHAHA Black doesn't even manage 10%
May-14-05  ArturoRivera: dont screw it up, this line cant be so bad, cant believe black has no notable games. Capablanca managed to win some good games with this, it was his favorite variation!!
Sep-12-05  vampiero: Help me out guys, i was playing chess on my phone to pass the time and i came up with this variation:

1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Bg5 Be7 5.e3 0-0 6.Nf3 Nbd7 is the standard orthodox

7.Rc1 c6 8.Bd3 dxc4 9.Bxc4 Nd5 is the standard Bd3 line

10. Bxd7 Qxd7 11. 0-0 is the usual continuation but at this point if thought of something a bit unusual (which seems good positonally for me)

11. ...N7b6!? was my opinion of it. it gains some tempo by hitting the bishop and making it retreat to b3(obviously whites good bishop isn't gonna trade of and neither is the knight at c3; if so then just exd5) and linking the knights: if needed(ie. e4) then just Nf3 followed by Re8 and there is a very strong position that is just WAITING for white to overextend itself

any ideas on my opening "novelty" or does it suck??

Sep-13-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  bumpmobile: What I find interesting is the strength of the white players who have lost to this opening...Zukertort, Fine, Marshall, Euwe, Gruenfeld. For only havning 16/165 black wins in the database, that is quite a list of scalps. Why do you think that is?
Nov-27-05  Paul123: For several reasons I often employ the Orthodox variation.

Its never been refuted and at best white advantage is marginal…yes blacks winning chances are also marginal but thats the trade off due to its solidness. It is great for punishing an aggresive opponent. And it's also good for dealing with unorthodox play seen at the club level.

Few players under 2200 USCF really understand the subtleties of the Orthodox (heck I seen games where even modern GM’s got lost) In today’s age where the Indians are all the rage, few know the subtleties of the Orthodox. for example who knows the theory of the Rubinstien attack? Usually my opponents seem to guess at the opening theory and I equalize easliy.

One get really good at the exchange variation …after opening with 1…d5 I see a lot of Exchange variations. and I don’t ever see the Tromp… because natural QGD moves (i.e.in a classical fashion) practically refute it.

I believe the main a reason why the exchange variation is so popular over the QGD is White hasn’t found a decent way of dealing with it and avoids it.

Finally..... There are a lot ofpublications easily obtainable featuring the Orthodox defense with high-level play from Lasker to Kramnik and everyone in between.

Nov-27-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  KingG: <Paul123> I think the exchange variation is so popular because it keeps more pieces on board and it's more interesting to play for White than the other defenses. Unlike many other openings(Slav, French, Caro-Kann), the exchange variation of the QGD isn't a drawing line. Personally, i like playing it with Ne2, f3. Then i have two plans, the minority attack, and building a strong centre with an eventual e4.
Nov-28-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  KingG: Obviously in the above post, mentioning the Caro-Kann exchange as being a drawing line is a mistake. You don't play the Panov-Botvinnik to draw, although in my opinion it is in fact pretty drawish.
Nov-28-05  Paul123: True....True and all true KingG

But a lot of it depends on if you look at the glass being half full or half empty.

For example, your perspective on the Exchange Variation and how it keeps the pieces on the board longer. As one who likes the Orthodox, my perspective is the Exchange breaks the tension in the center and gives black time to construct a defense.

Both of us like it for different reasons.

On the Orthodox
1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Bg5 Be7 5.e3 0–0 6.Nf3 Nbd7 7.Rc1 c6 8.Bd3 dxc4 9.Bxc4 Nd5 10.Bxe7 Qxe7 11.0–0 Nxc3 12.Rxc3 e5 “The Rubinstien” variation is about as complex as it gets despite the pieces removed from the board.

1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Bg5 Be7 5.e3 0–0 6.Nf3 Nbd7 7.Qc2 c5 Positions arising from 7. Qc2 and c5 variations I don’t find stogy or drawish

The Exchange Variation you mentioned 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.cxd5 exd5 5.Bg5 Be7 6.e3 c6 7.Bd3 Nbd7 8.Nge2 0–0 9.Qc2 I see this all the time and like it too. Although, I feel the classical line offers more challenges to Black.

I think classical opening offer winning chances as good as other more common modern openings. “Like Indian defenses” …just later in the game (i.e. the end game…old school chess) A win is a win, one still has to move the pieces either by grinding an advantage out in an end game or blowing the guy off the board with an opening novelty. It depends where and how one likes to fight.

Nov-28-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  KingG: <The Exchange Variation you mentioned 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.cxd5 exd5 5.Bg5 Be7 6.e3 c6 7.Bd3 Nbd7 8.Nge2 0–0 9.Qc2 I see this all the time and like it too.> I like playing this line as White, but the few time i've played it as Black(through transposition from a Semi-Slav), i've had some problems. You're supposed to play on the king-side apparently, but i don't find this very convincing. Since you like playing this line, how do you go about this?

<Although, I feel the classical line offers more challenges to Black.> I find this surprising. Surely White's only plan in the classical line is the minority attack, whereas in the line i mentioned, White has two plans(well, of course White can castle long and attack with his pawns, so i guess White has three plans).

Nov-28-05  Dudley: <Surely White's only plan in the classical line is the minority attack> I assume you mean that if White chooses the exchange variation and moves Nf3 instead of Nge2. There are many other plans for white that don't involve cxd5 such as the Pillsbury style attack with Ne5 and f4. Right?
Nov-28-05  Paul123: KingG

Generally the two variations below or variants of them are what I play.

I like to defer castling until the position somewhat clarifies so I play this line.

1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.cxd5 exd5 5.Bg5 c6 6.Qc2 Be7 7.e3 Nbd7 8.Bd3 Nh5 9.Bxe7 Qxe7 10.Nge2 and then I blunt the bishop with 10... g6 etc...

I think as long as black doesn’t panic and start moving his pawns he is ok as statistics show.

On Queenside castling I play something like this

1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.cxd5 exd5 5.Bg5 c6 6.Qc2 Be7 7.e3 Nbd7 8.Bd3 Nh5 9.Bxe7 Qxe7 10.0–0–0 g6 11.Kb1 Nb6 12.Nge2 Bd7 13.Ka1 Ng7 14.h4 Bf5 15.Nf4 0–0–0 = and white has no real thunder!!

In my experience in variations where white’s knight goes to e2 it’s hard for him to rip off a minority attack that is actually a real threat or advantage. He really has only play up the middle and on the kingside in my humble opinion. In the classical variation where the knight goes to f3, I think white has more options.

Nov-28-05  Paul123: Dudley

That is what I was refering too

Nov-29-05  Dudley: Reshevsky made a living with the exchange variation and was criticised for it, but he played it very well. In a sense, the exchange variation is responsible for the QGD's lack of popularity. I know that it is the most challenging line, or at least the one that bothers me the most if I play the QGD as Black. The statistics show an overwhelming advantage for White, but I am sure that if Black knows it well enough it is defensible. Intersting lines you play as Black but it seems like there must be some disadvantage in waiting to castle so long.

Nov-29-05  Paul123: I sure hope there isn’t a disadvantage for waiting long to castle. I use this line often with good results. I think it works because white exchanged in the center. White has space in this variation and black defers castling until it is clear what white is going to do with the space. (Not to mention trying to simplify at the same time if possible)

Statistically it a lot sounder than most Exchange lines In my CA Database I got the line performing at: draws at 45% 1-0 at 31.94% and 0-1 at 22.09%

Here at Chessgames.com their database has 1-0 at 42% draws at 42% and 0-1 at 15%

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