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Nimzo-Indian, Classical (E33)
1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 e6 3 Nc3 Bb4 4 Qc2 Nc6

Number of games in database: 731
Years covered: 1931 to 2019
Overall record:
   White wins 39.0%
   Black wins 27.4%
   Draws 33.7%

Popularity graph, by decade

Explore this opening  |  Search for sacrifices in this opening.
PRACTITIONERS
With the White Pieces With the Black Pieces
Salomon Flohr  12 games
Max Euwe  10 games
Paul Keres  8 games
Milner-Barry  10 games
Samuel Reshevsky  9 games
Haije Kramer  8 games
NOTABLE GAMES [what is this?]
White Wins Black Wins
Keres vs Euwe, 1940
Lokvenc vs Pachman, 1943
Capablanca vs V Mikenas, 1939
Kotov vs Botvinnik, 1939
M Gerusel vs Lombardy, 1957
L L Gonzalez vs G H Perrine, 1943
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 page 1 of 30; games 1-25 of 731  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. Flohr vs Nimzowitsch 0-1641931BledE33 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
2. Flohr vs Milner-Barry 1-0251932LondonE33 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
3. Menchik vs Milner-Barry 1-0311932CambridgeE33 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
4. Sultan Khan vs Milner-Barry 1-0561932Cambridge PremierE33 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
5. A Staehelin vs H Johner  ½-½411932BerneE33 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
6. G Goldberg vs G Miasoedov  1-0251932Leningrad ChampionshipE33 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
7. Flohr vs C H Alexander ½-½691933Hastings 1932/33E33 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
8. Chodera vs Pelikan  1-0411934Kautsky mem 9thE33 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
9. Lilienthal vs Milner-Barry 1-0301934Hastings 1933/34E33 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
10. Stoltz vs Nimzowitsch 0-1501934Nordisk SkakforbundE33 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
11. S Belavenets vs Ragozin 1-0391934USSR Championship 1934/35E33 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
12. Capablanca vs Milner-Barry 1-0511934Hastings 1934/35E33 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
13. V Mikenas vs Tartakower 0-1421935LodzE33 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
14. Flohr vs P Romanovsky 1-0691935MoscowE33 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
15. Spielmann vs P Romanovsky  1-0761935MoscowE33 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
16. Reshevsky vs Milner-Barry  ½-½611935MargateE33 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
17. M Feigin vs W Michel  1-0371935Warsaw ol (Men)E33 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
18. Alekhine vs Makarczyk / Najdorf ½-½481935Consultation gameE33 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
19. Euwe vs Alekhine ½-½181935Alekhine - Euwe World Championship MatchE33 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
20. Botvinnik vs Ragozin 1-0261936Training GameE33 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
21. Spielmann vs A Wojciechowski  0-1391936WarsawE33 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
22. G Goldberg vs Ragozin  0-1401936Leningrad-chE33 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
23. P Trifunovic vs B Kostic  1-0461936Novi SadE33 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
24. Ragozin vs Riumin ½-½181936MoscowE33 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
25. Botvinnik vs Kan 1-0401936MoscowE33 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
 page 1 of 30; games 1-25 of 731  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  

Kibitzer's Corner
Dec-04-03  refutor: i imagine the popularity of this line has dropped immensely because modern players aren't so quick to block their c-pawn in queen's pawn openings?
Dec-04-03  Benjamin Lau: Yes, that's probably one big reason. The main exception to this rule though in the Nimzo Indian (when it is OK to block your c-pawn) is when your opponent plays 4. Qb3. Then modern theory suggests 4...Nc6 to protect the bishop instead of 4...c5, which gives black a problematic backward pawn. But in spite of this, ...c5 is still the more common move and even Reuben Fine who condemned ...c5 in his book Ideas Behind the Chess Openings played it occasionally so it's probably not that much worse.
Dec-25-04  bensoni: Also, remember that a many players are not getting to this position via the specified move order anymore. Benjamin, Yermolinsky among others are getting here via the Black Knights Tango, e.g., 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 Nc6 3.Nc3 e6 4.Qc2 Bb4 or 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 Nc6 3.Nc3 e6 4.Nc3 Bb4 5.Qc2 d6 and so on, instead of a move order involving 4...Nc6.
Aug-20-05  Dudley: This is the line featured in a repertoire book Chess Openings for Black Explained by Alburt, Dzindzichashvili, etc. The idea seems to be to choose similar lines to the Bogo Indian which is the sister opening in case of 3. Nf3.
Sep-13-11  ProjectR: When i see any chess video's on youtube,the 4.Qc2 move is always described as "Kasparovs pet move" or something similar.. And how come all the greats have moves/gambits/openings etc..named after them,yet im unaware of any named after Kasparov..And the popularity graph shows a steep decline in this opening played by top GM's...why ?? I dont mind this opening at all,iv had some really good games with it...
Sep-13-11  nummerzwei: <ProjectR: When i see any chess video's on youtube,the 4.Qc2 move is always described as "Kasparovs pet move" or something similar.. And how come all the greats have moves/gambits/openings etc..named after them,yet im unaware of any named after Kasparov..And the popularity graph shows a steep decline in this opening played by top GM's...why ?? I dont mind this opening at all,iv had some really good games with it...>

Note that this ECO code is for 4.Qc2 Nc6 only. Other lines after 4.Qc2 are more popular today.

As regards opening lines named after Kasparov, the reason is simply that he's a relatively modern player. When he was active, a lot of variations had already been named after other people.

Sep-15-11  ProjectR: <nummerzwei> thanks for you above post and help
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