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King's Indian Defense (E60)
1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 g6

Number of games in database: 3280
Years covered: 1922 to 2014
Overall record:
   White wins 37.1%
   Black wins 24.4%
   Draws 38.5%

Popularity graph, by decade

Explore this opening  |  Search for sacrifices in this opening.
PRACTITIONERS
With the White Pieces With the Black Pieces
Alexander Baburin  35 games
Jan Hein Donner  29 games
Viktor Korchnoi  24 games
Peter Svidler  29 games
John Nunn  25 games
Ilya Smirin  23 games
NOTABLE GAMES [what is this?]
White Wins Black Wins
Euwe vs Najdorf, 1953
Botvinnik vs Bronstein, 1951
Kasparov vs Nunn, 1986
R Byrne vs Fischer, 1963
L Stumpers vs Euwe, 1946
Botvinnik vs Smyslov, 1954
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 page 1 of 132; games 1-25 of 3,280  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. Saemisch vs Reti 0-133 1922 3, Teplitz-Schonau it GERE60 King's Indian Defense
2. Gruenfeld vs Reti  ½-½35 1923 ViennaE60 King's Indian Defense
3. Bogoljubov vs Tarrasch 1-028 1923 KarlsbadE60 King's Indian Defense
4. Gruenfeld vs Yates  ½-½32 1923 KarlsbadE60 King's Indian Defense
5. Alekhine vs J H Morrison 1-028 1923 LeedsE60 King's Indian Defense
6. Alekhine vs E T Jesty 1-041 1923 Portsmouth-Southsea (01)E60 King's Indian Defense
7. Loman vs Euwe 0-162 1923 ?E60 King's Indian Defense
8. Gruenfeld vs Euwe  ½-½54 1923 Maehrisch - OstrauE60 King's Indian Defense
9. Euwe vs Yates 1-044 1923 ScheveningenE60 King's Indian Defense
10. A Pokorny vs Gruenfeld  0-154 1923 Maehrisch - OstrauE60 King's Indian Defense
11. Colle vs Koltanowski 0-171 1923 ch BELE60 King's Indian Defense
12. M Walter vs Hromadka  ½-½52 1923 Maehrisch - OstrauE60 King's Indian Defense
13. G Andreev vs Botvinnik 0-146 1924 LeningradE60 King's Indian Defense
14. Colle vs Euwe 1-036 1924 Zutphen m ,HCL 28E60 King's Indian Defense
15. Marshall vs Reti ½-½50 1924 New YorkE60 King's Indian Defense
16. Kupchik vs Bogoljubov  ½-½53 1924 Bogoljubov-Kupchik MatchE60 King's Indian Defense
17. J Davidson vs Euwe  0-156 1924 MatchE60 King's Indian Defense
18. V Vukovic vs S Gruber  1-061 1924 GyorE60 King's Indian Defense
19. A Vajda vs E Steiner  1-030 1924 GyorE60 King's Indian Defense
20. Colle vs Gruenfeld 0-145 1924 MeranoE60 King's Indian Defense
21. G Fontein vs Euwe  0-131 1924 NED-ch05E60 King's Indian Defense
22. Rubinstein vs O C Mueller  1-035 1924 Major OpenE60 King's Indian Defense
23. Kmoch vs L Steiner 1-025 1925 DebrecenE60 King's Indian Defense
24. Rubinstein vs Carls 1-042 1925 Baden-BadenE60 King's Indian Defense
25. Gruenfeld vs Carls  1-035 1925 Baden-BadenE60 King's Indian Defense
 page 1 of 132; games 1-25 of 3,280  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  
 

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 6 OF 6 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Mar-03-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  Willem Wallekers: chessman: Yes it is, if that isn't surprising enough all I can think of is (well, there is also the Budapest gambit) 1. d4 b6 2. e4 Bb7 3. Bd3 f5, but that's unsound.
Mar-03-09  chessman95: What about the pterodactyl system? (black sets up with g6,Bg7,c5,and Qa5) There's a surprising amount of theory on it on the internet and it seems rare enough. Does anyone know if it's sound?
Mar-04-09  GeauxCool: <chessman95>

Look through some of the games by Raymond Keene, Lawrence Day, Eric Schiller, or Alvah Mayo who all kibitz on <CG>. They may even answer a few questions for you!

For a clear lesson in the <Pterodactyl rhamporhynchus> subvariation, see: D Howell vs L Day, 2005

And how close is this one? Topalov vs I Sokolov, 2006

Mar-04-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  KingG: <chessman95> What openings do you play against d4, c4 and e4 at the moment? And when you say everyone knows the theory, roughly up to what move are you talking about?
Mar-04-09  chessman95: <KingG> Against e4 I almost always play the Sicilian. Against d4 I play Nizmoindian against Nc3 and Queen's Indian against Nf3. Against the Enlish I play ...e5. When I said that everyone knows the indian theory, I didn't have a specific move in mind, I was just saying that most people are familiar with the ideas and main lines of most indian openings, so they're not ideal for a surprise anymore.
Apr-28-09  returnoftheking: Can someone explain to me why


click for larger view

is so much less popular than variants with e5?

Variants with Bg4 seem to lead to ok positions for black very easily.

Apr-29-09  SimonWebbsTiger: I presume returnoftheking it has a lot to do with the resulting positions. White, supposedly, can get an edge far more easily after 6...c5 and not everyone likes the Knight on the edge after 7. o-o Nc6 8. d5 Na5. Also, after say 7. d5 , White isn't obliged to play c:d5 (e:d5 instead) when Black seeks play by ...e6 and capture on d5.

Relatively speaking, there is lesser dynamism in the Black set up since White isn't about to face a King Side attack any time soon!

Of course, if you enjoy those positions you should play them. It avoids the monster analysis after the traditional ...e5 advance. It's a practical solution and I am sure the edge white does get doesn't matter too much for us mere mortals. :-)

Apr-29-09  returnoftheking: TY, interesting opinion. But besides all the drawbacks it has one big pro: the bishop diagonal is notclosed. If white 0-0 Nc6 is yugoslav variation I think (with knight on the rim) but black could also play cxd4 with a decent position. Almost a bit hedgehog like. Or Bg4, trading bishop and Nd7 with enough space for black's remaining pieces.
Jun-27-09  WhiteRook48: I don't think 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 is the KID yet since it's transpositional
Jul-07-09  WhiteRook48: so 3. f4. Confused yet?
Jul-28-09  WhiteRook48: or maybe even 3 Bg5?!?!
Aug-18-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  parisattack: <chessman95: Maybe you're right. I remember reading it in an opening book I got on Indian Games, so I just assumed it was right. By the way, I'm looking for a good surprise weapon against 1.d4. I can't seem to find any in the Indian Games, because everyone knows that theory now. And the Dutch is too well known as well, although I do use it. Is the Polish Defense a sound opening? I can't find any good analysis on it, but I was considering starting to play it.>

There are a couple of books on the Polish Defense - and the related Owen's. I've played it and like it. Black can get positions that are very similar to other openings such as a Kan Sicilian, a Classical French. It has two features I like in a defense - flexibility and the possiblity of play on either/both wings.

The Symmetrical Defense and the Albin are also worth a look-see.

Sep-25-09  James Demery: Why is the winning% so low in this defense? Fischer swore by this defense and had excellent results with it. Has this defense been busted or just gone out of style?
Sep-25-09  Marmot PFL: I'm not sure its results are worse than most defenses.
Sep-25-09  Marmot PFL: <parisattack> I play 1 d4 Nf6 2 Nf3 b5 for black, but 1 d4 b5 2 e4 looks tougher to meet.
Jul-15-10  rapidcitychess: <JD> This is when Black (or white) doesn't play KID or Grunfeld.
Jul-25-10  freakclub: Playing the black pieces, and employing the king's indian defense, I've been losing some games lately against the h4 attack.

The variation goes like this: 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. h4!

And white proceeds with Be2, g4, h5, etc.

Does anyone know the name of this variation, and what is the most effective defense against it?

Any help is greatly appreciated.

Jul-26-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Chessical: <Freakclub> I have not seen this idea before, but I do not believe that it should be too dangerous. For example:

1. d4 g6 2. c4 Bg7 3. Nc3 d6 <4. h4> Nf6 5. e4 O-O 6. h5 Nxh5 7. Be2 Nf6 8. Be3 (<8. Nf3> c5 9. d5 a6) <8...c5> 9. d5 b5 10. cxb5 a6 11. bxa6 Bxa6 and Black is better.

I do not think that the radical <7. Rxh5!?> works <7...gxh5> 8. Qxh5 Nc6 9. Nf3 e5 (this seems better than <9... Nxd4> 10. Nxd4 Bxd4 11. Bh6 Re8 12. O-O-O Bxc3 13. bxc3 e5)

Jul-27-10  freakclub: Hi Chessical; I have found some games in the database with white playing Be2 and h4, e.g. Kapu vs. Szabo (1964) which went: 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.Be2 0-0 6.h4 c5 7.d5 e6 8.h5 exd5 9.hxg6 fxg6 10.cxd5 Qe7 11.Bg5 a6 12.a4 Nbd7 13.f4 Rb8 14.Qd3 b5! etc.

Now if White plays 8.g4 (instead of 8.h5), then play should probably continue 8...exd5 9.cxd5. But here now is the crucial point. How should black proceed?

If 9...Re8 or 9...Qe7, then white plays 10. f3. Sure White has a somewhat over-extended pawn structure but how should black exploit this? Do you see any good strategy for black?

I don't think 10...h5 works, because after 11.g5 Black's position is somewhat cramped.

Jul-30-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Chessical: <freakclub> 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. Be2 O-O 6. h4 c5 7. d5 e6; and now:

<8. g4> exd5 9. cxd5 Qe7 10. f3


click for larger view

I believe that there are two reasonable continuations for Black:

<10... h5> 11. g5 Nfd7 12. Be3 f5 13. gxf6 Bxf6

or:

<10... Bxg4!?> 11. fxg4 Nxe4 12. Nxe4 Qxe4 13. Nf3 Re8 14. Kf2 Qxg4 15. h5 Nd7, with three pawns for the piece.

Jul-30-10  freakclub: Chessical; Thanks a lot! I shall be looking forward to employing 10...Bxg4! in actual play, as it also puts White into a sort of psychological disadvantage in this position. :-)
Mar-12-11  Penguincw: Opening of the Day:
King's Indian
1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7
Aug-05-11  bronkenstein: Excellent compilation of tactical themes for black in King`s Indian , credits to Eric Schiller : http://www.ericschiller.com/pdf/Kin...
Sep-15-12  zoren: Kings Indian being pasted (crushed) in 2012, anyone know whats happening?! Even Radjabov is struggling with it.
Sep-15-12  SimonWebbsTiger: @<zoren>

the KID has always been a risky opening. After all, black gives white so much space with the hope his position can unfurl like a spring, with dreadful effects. As it stands 9.b4 in the Classical is the major headache for the KID player. Look at Kramnik's win versus Grischuk for a KID horror story and, saying that, wonderful play by Kramnik.

It's typical of opening theory, though. Strong ideas and resources are found for white which haven't yet found an antidote from black. They will come. Then, as "they" say, the ball will be back in white's court.

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