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King's Indian, Fianchetto (E62)
1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 g6 3 Nc3 Bg7 4 Nf3 d6 5 g3

Number of games in database: 2813
Years covered: 1917 to 2017
Overall record:
   White wins 40.8%
   Black wins 25.5%
   Draws 33.7%

Popularity graph, by decade

Explore this opening  |  Search for sacrifices in this opening.
PRACTITIONERS
With the White Pieces With the Black Pieces
Jan Smejkal  33 games
Aleksander Wojtkiewicz  24 games
Anatoly Karpov  20 games
Vlastimil Jansa  34 games
Ilya Smirin  30 games
Viktor Kupreichik  19 games
NOTABLE GAMES [what is this?]
White Wins Black Wins
Alekhine vs N Schwartz, 1926
Alekhine vs Reti, 1924
Keene vs C Micheli, 1973
Alekhine vs Yates, 1923
Korchnoi vs Fischer, 1962
Karpov vs G Needleman, 2005
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 page 1 of 113; games 1-25 of 2,813  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. Vidmar vs Tartakower  1-050 1917 ViennaE62 King's Indian, Fianchetto
2. Rubinstein vs Reti ½-½32 1919 StockholmE62 King's Indian, Fianchetto
3. Alekhine vs Yates 0-150 1923 KarlsbadE62 King's Indian, Fianchetto
4. J Bernstein vs Yates  1-089 1923 KarlsbadE62 King's Indian, Fianchetto
5. J Bernstein vs G A Thomas  1-045 1923 KarlsbadE62 King's Indian, Fianchetto
6. Alekhine vs F H Stirling ½-½33 1923 Simul, 37bE62 King's Indian, Fianchetto
7. Alekhine vs Reti 1-044 1924 New YorkE62 King's Indian, Fianchetto
8. Colle vs K Behting  1-048 1924 ParisE62 King's Indian, Fianchetto
9. N Zubarev vs A Rabinovich  1-031 1925 USSR ChampionshipE62 King's Indian, Fianchetto
10. G A Thomas vs Yates  ½-½67 1925 MarienbadE62 King's Indian, Fianchetto
11. G Fontein vs Euwe  0-150 1925 AmsterdamE62 King's Indian, Fianchetto
12. Alekhine vs N Schwartz 1-054 1926 Simul, 28bE62 King's Indian, Fianchetto
13. Gruenfeld vs Gilg  1-046 1926 SemmeringE62 King's Indian, Fianchetto
14. Gruenfeld vs Yates  1-074 1926 SemmeringE62 King's Indian, Fianchetto
15. Rubinstein vs M Bluemich  1-080 1926 DresdenE62 King's Indian, Fianchetto
16. M Monticelli vs Yates 1-051 1926 BudapestE62 King's Indian, Fianchetto
17. Reti vs Yates  0-139 1927 Hastings 1926/27E62 King's Indian, Fianchetto
18. Gruenfeld vs K Kullberg  1-037 1927 KecskemetE62 King's Indian, Fianchetto
19. K Ruben vs J W te Kolste  0-136 1927 1st olm finalE62 King's Indian, Fianchetto
20. S Landau vs Reti  0-132 1927 Rotterdam mE62 King's Indian, Fianchetto
21. A Muffang vs Giulio De Nardo  1-033 1928 OlympiadE62 King's Indian, Fianchetto
22. J Rejfir vs A Vajda  0-130 1928 The Hague ol (Men)E62 King's Indian, Fianchetto
23. L Abramavicius vs A Simonson  0-137 1933 OlympiadE62 King's Indian, Fianchetto
24. Kotov vs Panov 0-149 1936 Moscow RUSE62 King's Indian, Fianchetto
25. Capablanca vs Tylor 1-035 1936 NottinghamE62 King's Indian, Fianchetto
 page 1 of 113; games 1-25 of 2,813  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  
 

Kibitzer's Corner
Mar-06-04  Bartleby: I study the gambit lines of the Four Pawns Attack for slash-and-burn complications, but for pure solidity, I regularly fall back on this white setup vs. the King's Indian (also known as the Russian variation). Nice opening of the day choice.
Dec-24-08  MontyChesson: MCO gives the classical main line of the king's indian fianchetto variation to be: 1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 g6 3 Nc3 Bg7 4 Nf3 d6 5 g3 0-0 6.Bg2 Nbd7 7.0-0 e5 8.e4 c6 9.h3. However, there is no explanation. Can someone please explain to me why Black plays 8...c6? Doesn't it just weaken the d6 pawn? Wouldn't Re8 or a6 be better? Thanks.
Dec-25-08  blacksburg: 1. MCO is garbage. if you want to play a line as sharp as the KID, you need a specialist's book.

2. note that 9.h3 stops ...Ng4 in preparation for Be3.

3. Tal's comment on 8...c6, from game 6 of the 1960 match - "This is the most flexible. Black does not object to the blockading of the center, since, in this case, his knight will get a comfortable post on c5 and besides that, if there is a closed center, he is free to develop play on the kingside by withdrawing his knight from f6 to e8 or h5. The immediate capture on d4 gives white a well known edge and more freedom of play in the center and on the kingside."

<Doesn't it just weaken the d6 pawn?> yes, and black should be prepared to sac this pawn in some lines. i think kasparov said that you shouldn't play the KID unless you're comfortable being down a pawn.

<Wouldn't Re8 or a6 be better?>

Re8 makes it more beneficial for white to close the center. after d5, black's rook wishes it was on f8 to support ...f5 break.

a6 is an idea in some KID lines, but i don't think it accomplishes anything here, unless you have a specific idea.

Dec-25-08  blacksburg: also, note that in this system, if black plays ...Nc5 as Tal describes above, black also usually wants to play ...a5 to stop b4, so ...a6 would be a wasted tempo.
Dec-25-08  MontyChesson: <blacksburg>
Thanks, that was very helpful.
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