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Nicholas MacLeod
Number of games in database: 46
Years covered: 1889 to 1901
Overall record: +8 -35 =3 (20.7%)*
   * Overall winning percentage = (wins+draws/2) / total games
      Based on games in the database; may be incomplete.

MOST PLAYED OPENINGS
With the White pieces:
 King's Pawn Game (19) 
    C20 C44
With the Black pieces:
 Philidor's Defense (5) 
    C41
 King's Gambit Declined (4) 
    C30 C31
 Ruy Lopez (4) 
    C78 C62 C68 C65
Repertoire Explorer

NOTABLE GAMES: [what is this?]
   Blackburne vs N MacLeod, 1889 0-1

GAME COLLECTIONS: [what is this?]
   US Open 1901, Excelsior = 2nd Western Champ. by Phony Benoni

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NICHOLAS MACLEOD
(born Feb-08-1870, died Sep-27-1965) Canada

[what is this?]
Nicholas Menelaus MacLeod was born in Quebec, Canada. He was Canadian Champion in 1886 (scored 6/8 at Quebec) and 1888 (after play-off; James Ephraim Narraway & Edwin Pope also tied at 4/5), and won the Western Championship in 1901. He passed away in Spokane, USA in 1965.

References: http://www.chess.ca/, http://www.canadianchess.info/

Wikipedia article: Nicholas MacLeod


 page 1 of 2; games 1-25 of 46  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. Gossip vs N MacLeod 0-152 1889 USA-06.Congress New YorkC78 Ruy Lopez
2. N MacLeod vs Burn 0-136 1889 USA-06.Congress New YorkC44 King's Pawn Game
3. Showalter vs N MacLeod 1-026 1889 USA-06.Congress New YorkC30 King's Gambit Declined
4. N MacLeod vs D M Martinez 1-038 1889 USA-06.Congress New YorkC20 King's Pawn Game
5. Blackburne vs N MacLeod 0-155 1889 New YorkC21 Center Game
6. Blackburne vs N MacLeod 1-031 1889 USA-06.Congress New YorkC31 King's Gambit Declined, Falkbeer Counter Gambit
7. N MacLeod vs M Judd  0-139 1889 USA-06.Congress New YorkC20 King's Pawn Game
8. J W Baird vs N MacLeod 1-024 1889 USA-06.Congress New YorkC62 Ruy Lopez, Old Steinitz Defense
9. Bird vs N MacLeod 1-024 1889 USA-06.Congress New YorkC30 King's Gambit Declined
10. N MacLeod vs Max Weiss 0-143 1889 USA-06.Congress New YorkC20 King's Pawn Game
11. N MacLeod vs J W Baird  1-089 1889 USA-06.Congress New YorkC20 King's Pawn Game
12. N MacLeod vs Gossip 1-053 1889 USA-06.Congress New YorkC20 King's Pawn Game
13. W Pollock vs N MacLeod 1-031 1889 USA-06.Congress New YorkC68 Ruy Lopez, Exchange
14. N MacLeod vs Bird 0-129 1889 New York CongressC20 King's Pawn Game
15. N MacLeod vs Lipschutz  0-136 1889 USA-06.Congress New YorkC44 King's Pawn Game
16. D M Martinez vs N MacLeod 1-036 1889 USA-06.Congress New YorkC41 Philidor Defense
17. N MacLeod vs Taubenhaus 0-147 1889 USA-06.Congress New YorkC44 King's Pawn Game
18. N MacLeod vs Chigorin 0-123 1889 USA-06.Congress New YorkC20 King's Pawn Game
19. Burille vs N MacLeod 1-021 1889 USA-06.Congress New YorkB12 Caro-Kann Defense
20. Taubenhaus vs N MacLeod 1-047 1889 USA-06.Congress New YorkC25 Vienna
21. Max Weiss vs N MacLeod 1-022 1889 USA-06.Congress New YorkC41 Philidor Defense
22. N MacLeod vs J M Hanham 0-143 1889 USA-06.Congress New YorkC20 King's Pawn Game
23. E Delmar vs N MacLeod 1-026 1889 USA-06.Congress New York (22-2)A03 Bird's Opening
24. D G Baird vs N MacLeod ½-½44 1889 USA-06.Congress New YorkC45 Scotch Game
25. N MacLeod vs W Pollock 0-141 1889 USA-06.Congress New YorkC44 King's Pawn Game
 page 1 of 2; games 1-25 of 46  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2) | MacLeod wins | MacLeod loses  

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 1 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Oct-13-04  Whitehat1963: This guy got buried by an 18th century who's who of chess. And his (almost always losing) pet opening of 1. e4, e5 2. c3 should be named the "MacLeod Opening" ... not that I'd recommend it to anyone. But hey, Steinitz lauded his ending play in this game: N MacLeod vs Gossip, 1889 ... but only after he through in several question marks leading up to an ending that plays like a puzzle. Does anyone know anything about this guy?
Jan-23-05  InfinityCircuit: I'm curious about why Steinitz loved to annotate so many of his games.
Jan-23-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  tpstar: <InfinityCircuit> Annotating your games (wins and losses) is a surefire way to improve. You have all the time in the world to analyze different lines for both sides, plus you discover exactly when your opening book runs out. In his case, he was World Champion for years, so it served a double purpose in helping prepare for those same opponents in the future. Try annotating one of your games and see how much you learn. Good luck.
Jan-23-05  azaris: I think the question was, "why did Steinitz annotate MacLeod's games". The answer might be that Steinitz being flat broke, he probably annotated other people's games for money.
Jan-29-05  InfinityCircuit: <tpstar> Thanks, I already know why people annotate their own games. I do it myself occasionally. However, I appreciate the advice.

<azaris> THanks for seeing past the poor wording of my question. That seems like a reasonable answer.

Jun-29-05  Resignation Trap: <InfinityCircuit> Steinitz edited the book to this tournament, that's why his notes appear here. By the way, has anyone else ever lost 31 games in a single tournament? I don't think so.
Jul-08-05  12929011: Hey resignation trap, what is your real name?
Jul-08-05  Resignation Trap: <12929011> My name is Jim Kulbacki. I was one of the most active tournament players in the USA from 1978-1987. Were you one of my opponents?
Jul-08-05  12929011: No, but I live in Longmont, Colorado, and thought that I may have seen you at some tournaments, but I don't think I have.
Oct-05-08  Mibelz: Nicholas MacLeod played 38 games in the Sixth American Chess Congress at New York 1889. He took 20th place, scoring +6=1-31.
Dec-06-08  gauer: Compare Nick's age to his opposition, many others at least ~5+ years older than the upcoming 19 year-old Cdn. star for this 30+ round veteran tournament of New York 1889, used as a Challenger selection vs a future match with Steinitz.

http://web.ncf.ca/bw998/canchess.html details some other info: Tied for first in Cdn. Championship., 1887;
Youngest ever Cdn. Champ., just past 16th birthday in 1886 & also later Cdn. Champ., 1888; Only player to beat Em. Lasker in simul. exhibit, Quebec 1892; Minnesota Champion 1899;
Won 2nd Western Chess Association Tournament (later called U.S. Open) 1901.

By coincidence, another Nick, Nikolay Noritsyn , is also scoring well in the Cdn. Championships, also age 16.

Feb-08-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  brankat: The youngest Canadian Champion ever!

R.I.P. master MacLeod.

Feb-08-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: <brankat> ...and a fine example for longevity. :D
Feb-08-09  WhiteRook48: this guy did not win a lot of his games
Feb-08-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: <WhiteRook48> Do you mean these thinks are related?
Feb-08-09  WhiteRook48: what are related?
Feb-08-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: There is no causality between longevity and losing, right?
Feb-08-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: I don't know. What about N.N.?
Feb-08-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  brankat: The only games listed here are the ones which 19 years old Mr.McLeod played at the 6th American Congress in New York, 1889.

He did win Canadian Championship twice, won also Championship of the State of Minnesota, 1899, and was a winner of the 2nd Western Chess Association Tournament (US Open) in 1901.

So, there must have been considerably more than just 6 wins :-)

Feb-09-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: The eternal recurrence of the N.N.
Nov-06-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: To compensate for the lack of wins, here's a description of MacLeod's style published in the St. Paul Dispatch following his victory at the 1901 Western Championship:

<"MacLeod plays chess on a plane peculiarly his own. His games are. therefore, to be criticised not from the standpoint of the hand book, but from the principles laid down by Young, which is known as synthetical chess. That is to say, each move is made from a base of operation that brings all pieces into immediate play with the least possible waste of time, while at the same time protecting that base about the king in the best formative manner. In doing this, the opponent wonders at the beginning of the game what kind of man is entrenched on the other side of the board. He becomes more or less wary as he notices that MacLeod is fortifying a weak point here and there. Then he commences to send his scouts further out and the report comes in that MacLeod's forces are sleeping on their arms. Then he sounds the bugle, for a grand charge on the left wing. He deploys all of his doughty knights in the skirmish. There is more or less blood shed. But the line ahead is as strong as adamant. But he has forgotten his right wing, now unsupported; he sees the clouds of battle gather on that fatal weak point. He seeks to recall his scattered army, but too late. The sleepy warrior pours a deadly broadside on the unsupported infantry and we gracefully capitulate.">

Sounds more like Nimzowitsch or Petrosian. And he appears to have followed the theories of Franklin K. Young, who may yet turn out to have been the Father of Modern Chess.

Feb-08-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  brankat: Happy Birthday Mr.MacLeod!
Feb-08-12  BIDMONFA: Nicholas MacLeod

MACLEOD, Nicholas
http://www.bidmonfa.com/macleod_nic...
_

Feb-08-12  Penguincw: R.I.P. Nicholas MacLeod.
Feb-08-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  LIFE Master AJ: I had a Navy (candidate) Pilot student some 20+ years ago.

We went to the Toronto Open, (early 1990's - the pilot's grand-parents were from that area); I did not get to play, as I got the flu the week before the tournament.

I do remember meeting a very young man, he was around 10 years old. His great (or great-great) Grand-father was none other than "McCloud" who was the Canadian Champ some 100 years previously.

Must have been this guy they were talking about, amazing how some details stick in your head. (I think Dennis Weaver wore a cowboy hat and used to play a character of the same name on TV ... I doubt if anyone hear remembers that show. ---> That used to be one of my favorite TV shows!)

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