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Geza Nagy
  
Number of games in database: 78
Years covered: 1913 to 1938

Overall record: +37 -24 =17 (58.3%)*
   * Overall winning percentage = (wins+draws/2) / total games in the database.

MOST PLAYED OPENINGS
With the White pieces:
 Ruy Lopez (11) 
    C66 C65 C83 C71 C98
 English (6) 
    A15 A13 A12
 Sicilian (5) 
    B40 B20 B44 B21 B32
With the Black pieces:
 French Defense (8) 
    C01 C15 C00 C17
 Queen's Indian (4) 
    E15 E18 E14 E12
Repertoire Explorer

NOTABLE GAMES: [what is this?]
   M Walter vs G Nagy, 1924 1/2-1/2
   G Nagy vs Rubinstein, 1926 1-0
   G Nagy vs Przepiorka, 1925 1-0
   H K Mattison vs G Nagy, 1925 0-1

NOTABLE TOURNAMENTS: [what is this?]
   Debrecen (1925)


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GEZA NAGY
(born Dec-29-1892, died Aug-13-1953, 60 years old) Hungary
PRONUNCIATION:
[what is this?]
Géza Nagy was born in Sátoraljaújhely*. He was Hungarian champion in 1924 and awarded the IM title in 1950. He passed away in 1953 in Kaposvár.

*Wikipedia article: Satoraljaujhely

Wikipedia article: Geza Nagy


 page 1 of 4; games 1-25 of 78  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. J Mendelsohn vs G Nagy  0-1321913Debrecen-BC82 Ruy Lopez, Open
2. Fazekas vs G Nagy 1-0231913SatoraljaujhelyC83 Ruy Lopez, Open
3. G Nagy vs Vidmar 1-0441913BudapestC66 Ruy Lopez
4. J Balogh vs G Nagy  0-1281914BudapestC31 King's Gambit Declined, Falkbeer Counter Gambit
5. Przepiorka vs G Nagy  1-0451924GyorC79 Ruy Lopez, Steinitz Defense Deferred
6. A Vajda vs G Nagy  ½-½211924GyorD02 Queen's Pawn Game
7. G Nagy vs S Gruber  1-0331924GyorA04 Reti Opening
8. J A Seitz vs G Nagy  0-1371924GyorB13 Caro-Kann, Exchange
9. G Nagy vs J Balogh  1-0251924GyorA15 English
10. G Nagy vs V Vukovic  1-0731924GyorB02 Alekhine's Defense
11. G Nagy vs L Steiner 1-0311924GyorA15 English
12. G Nagy vs L Asztalos  ½-½321924GyorC68 Ruy Lopez, Exchange
13. G Nagy vs E Steiner 1-0441924GyorA07 King's Indian Attack
14. H Mueller vs G Nagy  ½-½381924GyorD47 Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav
15. M Walter vs G Nagy ½-½591924GyorD11 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
16. G Nagy vs Maroczy  ½-½391924GyorD55 Queen's Gambit Declined
17. Gruenfeld vs G Nagy 1-0111924DebrecenD70 Neo-Grunfeld Defense
18. G V R Exner vs G Nagy  ½-½541924GyorC01 French, Exchange
19. G Nagy vs K Havasi  1-0311924GyorC79 Ruy Lopez, Steinitz Defense Deferred
20. P F Johner vs G Nagy  1-0261925DebrecenD30 Queen's Gambit Declined
21. G Nagy vs Przepiorka 1-0341925DebrecenA15 English
22. Tartakower vs G Nagy  ½-½391925DebrecenC15 French, Winawer
23. K Havasi vs G Nagy 1-0471925DebrecenD10 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
24. G Nagy vs Prokes 0-1391925DebrecenA04 Reti Opening
25. J A Seitz vs G Nagy  1-0481925DebrecenD43 Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav
 page 1 of 4; games 1-25 of 78  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2) | Nagy wins | Nagy loses  

Kibitzer's Corner
Jul-14-07  Karpova: <In 1929 [sic], when Maróczy was approaching 60 years of age and had been participating in many important tournaments for a long time, the young Hungarian players began to say that he had passed into history and that the new players were superior to those of his day. They argued in the same way as do the young players of today with respect to the masters of 20 or 30 years ago.

Maróczy told me about it. “These young Hungarian players”, he said, “are nothing special. They play well but are at most players of the second or third rank. They do not know the real game, the great masters’ play; but they believe that they know a great deal and they say they are stronger than I. For my part, I am now old, I do not have the same interest as before, but their claims have annoyed me so much that I have told them I am ready to play a match with any of them.”

The outcome was that a match was organized between the old master and one of the young Hungarians [Géza Nagy], who had just [sic] won the national championship. The result of the match was total success for Maróczy, for his opponent lost five games without being able to score a single point.>

http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/...

Jan-10-08  paladin at large: Second issue - if anyone can get a hold of the games of the Maróczy-Nagy match and upload them, I would appreciate it. Thanks in advance.
Apr-17-08  percyblakeney: Nagy seems to have been quite a strong player for a short period. In Budapest 1926 he won against Reti and Rubinstein and finished one point from first place, ahead of for example Tartakower and Reti. He was also one of the players to win gold for Hungary in the Olympiads in 1927 and 1928.
Dec-29-09  BIDMONFA: Geza Nagy

NAGY, Geza

http://www.bidmonfa.com/nagy_geza.htm
_

Dec-29-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Where are the 1929 match games vs Maroczy?
Dec-29-09  Eastfrisian: The same question as ever: Any photo from him?

BTW: I wish a happy new year to all of you.

Dec-29-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: <Eastfrisian: Any photo from him?>

An approach only by method of elimination. He played in

<Gyor 1924>: http://www.rogerpaige.me.uk/histori...

<Budapest 1926>: http://www.rogerpaige.me.uk/histori...

:D

Mar-21-10  Eastfrisian: Meanwhile I found a good photo of him:

http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/...
Nr. 4808

Dec-01-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  visayanbraindoctor: <In 1929 [sic], when Maróczy was approaching 60 years of age and had been participating in many important tournaments for a long time, the young Hungarian players began to say that he had passed into history and that the new players were superior to those of his day. They argued in the same way as do the young players of today with respect to the masters of 20 or 30 years ago.

Maróczy told me about it. “These young Hungarian players”, he said, “are nothing special. They play well but are at most players of the second or third rank. They do not know the real game, the great masters’ play; but they believe that they know a great deal and they say they are stronger than I. For my part, I am now old, I do not have the same interest as before, but their claims have annoyed me so much that I have told them I am ready to play a match with any of them.”

The outcome was that a match was organized between the old master and one of the young Hungarians [Géza Nagy], who had just [sic] won the national championship. The result of the match was total success for Maróczy, for his opponent lost five games without being able to score a single point.>

Now IMO this is the way to definitively determine who is stronger between two chess players.

A match.

In those days, there were no rating systems, and so if two players had an argument who was the better, they resolved their argument by playing a one-on-one match. And every one thought it was perfectly logical then. Chess by nature is a game between two individuals.

Even today, if player A has a higher rating then player B, and they had an argument who is really better, player B should just challenge player A to a one-on-one match. If player A loses, how can he say he is better then player B, in spite of his higher rating?

Topalov had a higher rating then Kramnik by a wide margin. They played a one-on-one matches for the world Title in 2006. Topalov lost. In spite of his higher rating then, only rating fans would say that Topa was a better player than Kramnik in 2006.

Dec-29-12  Kikoman: Rest In Peace IM Geza Nagy.
Nov-05-13  Karpova: Györ Master Tournament 1924:

1. Dr. Nagy 10.0
2. Przepiorka 9.5
3. Dr. Astalos 9.0
4-5. Vukovic 8.5
4-5. Dr. Vajda 8.5
6-7. Walter 8.0
6-7. L Steiner 8.0
8-9. Maroczy 7.5
8-9. Müller 7.5
10. Kornel Havasi 6.5
11. E Steiner 6.0
12. Dr. Balogh 5.0
13. Dr. Seitz 4.5
14. Prof. Exner 3.5
15. Gruber 3.0

Nagy scored +7 -1 =6, losing to Przepiorka (+8 -3 =3).

From page 245 of the September 1924 'Neue Wiener Schachzeitung'

The Congress comprising several tournaments was assessed to cost 200,000,000 Hungarian Kronen (200 Million): 80,000,000 for food; 40,000,000 for printing, correspondence and other allowances; 45,000,000 for the Tournament book to be published; 8,000,000 for two banquettes; etc.

From page 233 of the August 1924 'Neue Wiener Schachzeitung'

Dec-29-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: R.I.P. IM Geza Nagy.
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