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Topalov 
Photograph copyright © 2005 World Chess Championship Press.  
Veselin Topalov
Number of games in database: 1,876
Years covered: 1986 to 2014
Last FIDE rating: 2785
Highest rating achieved in database: 2813
Overall record: +463 -241 =628 (58.3%)*
   * Overall winning percentage = (wins+draws/2) / total games
      Based on games in the database; may be incomplete.
      544 exhibition games, odds games, etc. are excluded from this statistic.

MOST PLAYED OPENINGS
With the White pieces:
 Sicilian (171) 
    B90 B33 B48 B30 B32
 Ruy Lopez (123) 
    C84 C78 C88 C67 C92
 Ruy Lopez, Closed (70) 
    C84 C88 C92 C95 C87
 Slav (61) 
    D17 D15 D12 D19 D11
 Queen's Indian (54) 
    E15 E16 E17 E12
 French Defense (52) 
    C11 C10 C19 C18 C02
With the Black pieces:
 Sicilian (261) 
    B90 B51 B33 B30 B22
 Sicilian Najdorf (103) 
    B90 B92 B91 B93 B97
 King's Indian (84) 
    E92 E97 E94 E98 E81
 Ruy Lopez (67) 
    C78 C67 C65 C88 C69
 Queen's Pawn Game (59) 
    E10 E00 A46 A40 A41
 Modern Benoni (53) 
    A57 A70 A58 A61 A67
Repertoire Explorer

NOTABLE GAMES: [what is this?]
   Topalov vs Kramnik, 2008 1-0
   Anand vs Topalov, 2005 1/2-1/2
   Topalov vs Aronian, 2006 1-0
   Topalov vs Anand, 2005 1-0
   Topalov vs Ponomariov, 2005 1-0
   Topalov vs Kasparov, 1996 1-0
   Kharlov vs Topalov, 2004 0-1
   Topalov vs Anand, 2010 1-0
   Kramnik vs Topalov, 2005 0-1
   Topalov vs Anand, 2005 1/2-1/2

WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS: [what is this?]
   FIDE World Championship Knockout Tournament (2001)
   FIDE World Championship Knockout Tournament (2004)
   FIDE World Championship Tournament (2005)
   Kramnik-Topalov World Championship Match (2006)
   Anand-Topalov World Chess Championship (2010)

NOTABLE TOURNAMENTS: [what is this?]
   Linares (1994)
   10th Euwe Memorial (1996)
   Linares (1997)
   7th Corsica Open (2003)
   XXII Torneo Ciudad de Linares (2005)
   Linares 2006 (2006)
   Corus Wijk aan Zee (2006)
   Corus (2007)
   Liga de Campeones (2007)
   2008 Olympiad (2008)
   Chess Olympiad (2012)
   FIDE Grand Prix Zug (2013)

GAME COLLECTIONS: [what is this?]
   Match Topalov! by amadeus
   Exchange sacs - 1 by obrit
   Guess-the-Move Chess: 2000-2010 (Part 3) by Anatoly21
   Topalov! by larrewl
   Topalov great games by Topzilla
   Guess-the-Move Chess: 2000-2010 (Part 1) by Anatoly21
   Guess-the-Move Chess: 2000-2010 (Part 2) by Anatoly21
   Classic Topalov by amadeus
   Topalov and the two bishops by OJC
   Najdorf, English Attack by AdrianP
   AdrianP's Bookmarked Games (2005) by AdrianP
   Complex favorites by Whitehat1963
   Najdorf - 6. Be3 by pcmvtal

Search Sacrifice Explorer for Veselin Topalov
Search Google for Veselin Topalov
FIDE player card for Veselin Topalov


VESELIN TOPALOV
(born Mar-15-1975) Bulgaria

[what is this?]
IM (1989); GM (1992); World U14 Champion (1989); Olympiad Gold Medalist (1994); FIDE World Champion (2005-06); World Championship Challenger (2010); Candidate (2011 and 2014); winner of the 2012-13 Grand Prix series.

Preamble

A former – and the last - FIDE World Champion, Veselin Topalov was born in Rousse, Bulgaria. He learned chess at eight years old from his father and began a training/mentoring relationship with Silvio Danailov when he was twelve.

Youth championships

In 1989, he won the World Under-14 championship in Aguadilla, Puerto Rico. In 1990 he won a silver medal in the World Under-16 Championship in Singapore.

World Championships

In the knockout tournaments for the FIDE World Chess Championship, Topalov was seeded into the second round in Groningen in 1998, and lost to Jeroen Piket. Again seeded into the second round at the championships in Las Vegas in 1999, Topalov reached the last 16 defeating Ruslan Ponomariov and Lev Psakhis before bowing out to Vladimir Kramnik. In New Delhi and Tehran in 2000, he reached the quarter-finals in 2000 – again from a second round start - defeating Andrei Kharlov, Kiril D Georgiev and Alexey Dreev before losing to Michael Adams. In 2002, he defeated Juan Facundo Pierrot, Giovanni Vescovi and Zhong Zhang before losing to Shirov. He reached the semi-finals in the FIDE World Championship Knockout Tournament (2004) in Tripoli, defeating Tarik Abulhul, Aleksander Delchev, Sergei Movsesian, Zdenko Kozul and Andrei Kharlov in the earlier rounds before losing to eventual winner Rustam Kasimdzhanov.

He also took part in the 2002 Dortmund Candidates' tournament to determine a challenger for World Classical Champion Kramnik, but lost the finals match to Peter Leko.

On the strength of his rating, Topalov was invited to the eight-player, double round-robin FIDE World Championship Tournament (2005) in San Luis, Argentina, in September–October 2005. Scoring 6˝/7 in the first cycle, Topalov had virtually clinched the tournament at the halfway mark, before drawing every game in the second cycle to win by 1˝ points to become FIDE World Chess Champion. The average rating of the field in the championship was 2739, and Topalov's performance rating was 2890. In 2006 he lost his title to Kramnik in the reunification Kramnik-Topalov World Championship Match (2006) played in Elista, under the auspices of FIDE. By losing the reunification match, Topalov lost his chance to compete in the FIDE World Championship Tournament (2007) . Danailov expressed a desire for a rematch between Topalov and Kramnik, proposing a match in March 2007, though no such match took place. The issue was settled in June 2007 when Topalov (as well as Kramnik) was granted special privileges in the 2008-09 championship cycle. Topalov was given direct entry to a "Challenger Match" against the winner of the World Chess Cup (2007) , Gata Kamsky. The Topalov-Kamsky Match (2009) (the Challenger Match) took place in February 2009 in Hall 6 of NDK Sofia. Topalov won that match 4˝-2˝ and qualified to play against the World Champion Viswanathan Anand for the World Chess Champion title, but he lost the Anand-Topalov World Chess Championship (2010) by 6˝-5˝. Topalov automatically qualified for the World Championship Candidates (2011) for the World Chess Championship 2012, where he was the top seed. He faced 8th seeded Gata Kamsky in Kazan in Russia and lost his match 1.5-2.5 (+0 =3 -1), and was thereby eliminated from the 2012 World Championship cycle. He declined to participate in the World Cup (2011) and there was speculation about his future Championship intentions.

Late in 2012, Topalov rejoined the championship circuit from which he had been noticeably absent to take =1st alongside Boris Gelfand and Shakhriyar Mamedyarov at the 1st FIDE Grand Prix London (2012) of the 2012-2013 series, which was held in London. His score of 7/11 (+3 =8 -0; TPR 2834) netted him the 140 points to give a flying start to his 2014 World Championship campaign. A superb follow up at the FIDE Grand Prix Zug (2013), the 3rd event in the GP series, saw him take outright 1st with 8/11 (+5 =6) with a stellar performance rating for the event of 2924. It also added 170 Grand Prix points to his tally to take him to the lead with 310 points. A poor performance at the FIDE Grand Prix Thessaloniki (2013) with 4.5/11 earned him only 45 Grand Prix points, however, his =3rd in the FIDE Grand Prix Beijing (2013) earned him enough Grand Prix points to win the Grand Prix and guarantee his qualification into the World Chess Championship Candidates (2014). (1) His official rating also qualified him to participate in the World Cup (2013) if he so chose, but instead he successfully gambled that he would qualify via the Grand Prix series. At the Candidates event that was held in March 2014 in Khanty-Mansiysk, Topalov scored a disappointing 6/14 to place 8th and last.

Tournaments

Topalov first major tournament wins were Terrassa 1992 and Budapest zonal-B 1993. He played in Linares 1994 (6˝/13), Linares 1995 (8/13), Amsterdam 1995, and won at Polanica Zdroj and Elenite in 1995. In March 1996, Topalov won at Amsterdam (coming =1st with Garry Kasparov), Vienna (ahead of Anatoly Karpov), Novgorod, and Dos Hermanas (1st-2nd with Kramnik). In 1996, he was invited to Las Palmas, the first category 21 tournament, where he scored 5/10, in a field including Kasparov, Anand, Kramnik and Karpov. In 1996 he also took a series of top-level tournament wins-- Madrid and Dos Hermanas in May, Novgorod in July, Vienna in August, as well as Leon - to firmly establish himself among the world's leading players. Between 1997 and 2003, Topalov continued his tournament successes, winning at Antwerp 1997, Madrid 1997, Monaco 2001, Dortmund 2001 (joint first with Kramnik), NAO Chess Masters Cannes 2002 (joint first with Gelfand), the Hotel Bali Stars (2003) at Benidorm 2003, and coming 2nd at the category 16 tournament in Bosnia in 2001. 2004 saw Topalov participate in Wijk aan Zee Corus (2004) and 21st Linares (2004) (coming =4th on both occasions), and in the FIDE World Championship Knockout Tournament (2004). He began 2005 by climbing to third place on FIDE's world ranking list. Topalov finished 3rd behind Peter Leko and Anand at Corus 2005 and tied for first (coming second on count back) with Garry Kasparov at XXII Torneo Ciudad de Linares (2005) in Kasparov’s final tournament. Two months later, he won the inaugural MTel Masters (2005) event by a full point over Viswanathan Anand; the average rating of the participants was 2744, making this super-GM, double round-robin tournament the strongest in 2005. After his =2nd at Dortmund in 2005, Topalov followed up his 2005 World Championship Tournament victory (see below) with +5 and joint first (with Anand) at Corus Wijk aan Zee (2006) and =2nd at Linares 2006 (2006). There followed his successful defence of MTel Masters (2006) (with 6.5/10, half a point ahead of Gata Kamsky whom he beat 2-0), Topalov started the tournament somewhat hesitantly to later record four consecutive wins and decisively claim the title.

Topalov rebounded from his world championship reunification match loss to Kramnik in 2006 to finish equal first (with Levon Aronian and Teimour Radjabov) at the category 19 Corus (2007), but then a poor performance at Linares-Morelia (2007) caused him to lose his #1 spot in the world rankings to Anand. The next year, he regained the #1 position by convincingly winning the inaugural Bilbao Grand Slam Chess Final (2008), scoring +4 -1 =5 in the category-22 tournament. Also in 2007, he won the Mtel Masters (2007), the Liga de Campeones (2007) (a point and a half a head of Ruslan Ponomariov), and in 2008 he won Pearl Spring Chess Tournament (2008) (a point and a half ahead of Aronian). In 2009, he came 2nd with Magnus Carlsen behind Alexey Shirov in the M-Tel Masters (2009) and second behind Carlsen at the latter’s blitz at Pearl Spring Chess Tournament (2009). Soon after losing the world title bid in 2010, Topalov participated in the Essent Chess Tournament. He finished third of four players with only 2˝ points from 6 games and a 2645 performance. He lost both games against Judit Polgar and one against Shakhriyar Mamedyarov. Topalov won the Linares (2010) held from February 13 to 24 in Andalusia, Spain, defeating 2009 Chess World Cup champion Boris Gelfand in his final game. He finished 2010 with 4.5/10 at Nanjing Pearl Spring Tournament (2010). Topalov continued his unremarkable form since narrowly losing his 2010 World Championship match when in early 2012, he finished tenth at the category 21 Tata Steel (2012), scoring 5/13 (+1 -4 =8; TPR 2672), before returning to form in the 1st Grand Prix of the 2012-13 series (see above), in the 28th European Club Cup (2012), and with his =1st (2nd on tiebreak) at the Kings' Tournament (2012). That form, however, was less than par in the category 21 Norway Chess Tournament (2013) where he finished in the bottom half of the field with 4/9.

Olympiads

Topalov has been the leader of the Bulgarian national team since 1994 and has played top board for Bulgaria at every Olympiad in which he participated including Moscow 1994, Yerevan 1996, Elista 1998, Istanbul 2000, Dresden 2008, Khanty-Mansiysk 2010 and the Chess Olympiad (2012) in Istanbul. In 1994, he led the Bulgarians to a fifth-place finish, winning the gold medal for the top board, scoring 8.5/12 (TPR 2781). He won the silver medal for the top board in 1998 and 2000, scoring 8/11 on both occasions. In 2008, he won bronze with 6.5/8 and a TPR of 2821.

Other Team Play

In 1989 and 1990, Topalov played in the Bulgarian team contesting the Boys' Balkaniads competition, playing on board 2 in 1989 and board 1 in 1990, winning individual gold on both occasions, as well as a team gold in 1989 and team bronze in 1990. In 1994, he played top board for the gold medal winning Bulgarian national team in the Balkaniad team competition, and won an individual bronze. In 1999, he played 3 games for the gold medal winning European Club Championship team ŠK Bosna Sarajevo, winning two and drawing one. Topalov played top board for Bulgaria in the European Team Championships of 1999 (where he won individual gold), 2007, 2009 and 2011. He played board 3 for SOCAR in the European Club Cup (2013), scoring a solid 4.5/6 and winning individual and team bronze. Playing for Bulgaria, he also won individual gold for the top board at the European Team Championship (2013).

Matches

Topalov won the Topalov vs Nisipeanu Match (2006) by 3-1 (+2 =2 -0) in April 2006, the Blind Chess World Duel (2006) against Polgar by 3.5-2.5, and the Topalov-Laznicka Match (2013) by 4-2 (+3 -1 =2).

Rapid

Topalov won the Dos Hermanas XIV (2008) , 17–21 April 2008, defeating Francisco Vallejo-Pons (Spain) 2˝–1˝ in the final match by winning the first game and drawing the rest. He also won the Villarrobledo International Rapid Open (2008) with a commanding 8/9.

Ratings and rankings

<Classical> After Kasparov's retirement, Topalov topped the FIDE World Rating List from April 2006 to January 2007, during which time his Elo rating peaked at 2813, a level that had been surpassed only by Garry Kasparov, and subsequently by Anand, Carlsen and Aronian. He regained the world #1 ranking again in October 2008, and officially remained #1 until January 2010, when he fell to #2 behind Carlsen. He has been ranked number one a total of 27 months in his career, the fifth all-time high since the inception of the FIDE ranking lists in 1971 behind only Garry Kasparov, Anatoly Karpov, Robert James Fischer and most recently Carlsen.

After his unsuccessful challenge for the world title in 2010, his form declined such that by 1 October 2012, Topalov's rating was 2751, his lowest rating since July 2004 and his ranking to number 13 in the world, his lowest ranking since January 1995. However his return to form in September and October 2012 (see above) saw him return to the top 10, while his successful campaign in the Zug leg of the 2012-13 Grand Prix series saw him leap back to 4th in the world ratings.

As of 1 March 2014, Topalov's rating was 2785, thereby remaining Bulgaria's #1 player by a significant margin and remaining on #4 in the world raking;

<Rapid> 2772;

<Blitz> 2666.

Other

Topalov won the 2005 Chess Oscar. Although he now lives in Spain, Topalov still plays for Bulgaria and has enjoyed several athletic honors from his native country, including the Sportsman of the Year award for 2005. He is renowned for his aggressive style which is exemplified in his trademark and much-feared exchange sacrifice that he has employed with great effect at all levels of play. He and his partner have a daughter, Laura, who was born on 28 August 2013.

Sources and references:

(1) Wikipedia article: FIDE Grand Prix 2012%E2%80%932013; Live rating: http://www.2700chess.com/; Wikipedia article: Topalov; Wikipedia article: World Chess Championship 2012


 page 1 of 76; games 1-25 of 1,876  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. Topalov vs D Marholev 1-021 1986 TournamentC64 Ruy Lopez, Classical
2. A Strikovic vs Topalov 0-131 1988 Forli opB22 Sicilian, Alapin
3. Topalov vs G Minchev 0-154 1988 SofiaB57 Sicilian
4. C Garcia Palermo vs Topalov ½-½37 1988 ForliA41 Queen's Pawn Game (with ...d6)
5. P Votruba vs Topalov ½-½66 1988 ForliB06 Robatsch
6. Topalov vs V Lukov 0-127 1988 SofiaA61 Benoni
7. S De Eccher vs Topalov 0-167 1988 ForliA25 English
8. Topalov vs F Braga ½-½14 1988 10s, Forli op D19 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav, Dutch
9. Topalov vs Meduna  ½-½21 1988 ForliD18 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav, Dutch
10. Topalov vs R Mantovani 1-059 1988 ForliE12 Queen's Indian
11. Lizbov vs Topalov 0-129 1988 MoskauB92 Sicilian, Najdorf, Opocensky Variation
12. Topalov vs E Gonsior ½-½11 1988 ForliD55 Queen's Gambit Declined
13. Topalov vs Granda Zuniga 0-146 1988 Forli op 88\10A78 Benoni, Classical with ...Re8 and ...Na6
14. Topalov vs D Pedzich  ½-½41 1989 GroningenE73 King's Indian
15. Hracek vs Topalov ½-½63 1989 GroningenA22 English
16. Topalov vs T Fogarasi  ½-½23 1989 Ch Europe (juniors)D39 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin, Vienna Variation
17. Topalov vs A J Norris 1-035 1989 GroningenB06 Robatsch
18. M Stangl vs Topalov 0-123 1989 Arnhem Ech-jrA88 Dutch, Leningrad, Main Variation with c6
19. Topalov vs D Agnos 1-044 1989 Ch Europe (juniors)E98 King's Indian, Orthodox, Taimanov, 9.Ne1
20. Topalov vs T Demirel 1-040 1989 GroningenD51 Queen's Gambit Declined
21. S Danailov vs Topalov 0-138 1989 Sofia ch-BGA40 Queen's Pawn Game
22. Stefansson vs Topalov ½-½78 1989 ArnhemC16 French, Winawer
23. P Claesen vs Topalov  ½-½27 1989 Ch Europe (juniors)A27 English, Three Knights System
24. M Markovic vs Topalov 1-030 1989 GroningenC10 French
25. Topalov vs K Ninov  ½-½46 1989 Ch BLGD10 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
 page 1 of 76; games 1-25 of 1,876  PGN Download
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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 384 OF 691 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Oct-30-06  PeerGynt: <drik: 'Kramnik was not accused of cheating' ... Silvio Danailov accuses Kramnik of using Fritz 9. http://www.chessbase.com/newsdetail...;

Wrong. Danilov did not mention anything about Kramnik using Frotz 9 in his press release. He only pointed that 78% of his moves matched the first line of Fritz 9. The owner of the company producing F9 interpreted this as a comercial for F9 and promised F10 to nave at least 80% match with Kramnik's moves. Chessbase put that title "Danailov accused Kramnik of using Fritz ..." Therefore it was them who accused Kramnik, not Danailov.

Oct-30-06  centercounter: <Bufon: Very probably, specially after he avoided Kasparov for years.>

Given that there was a "no rematch" clause in the contract, Kasparov would have had to qualify for the rematch. He could, just as easily, have played in Dortmund during the qualifier year and earned that rematch.

Assuming all the principals still wanted a unified title, that would have greatly simplified Prague. As it was, despite Kirsan's comment, Prague fell completely to dust, mostly due to FIDE's failings, and the Topalov-Kramnik match had nothing to do with the realization of that agreement. With San Luis, Kirsan officially terminated all attempts at reconciliation, and only after, did the recent match get worked out, and only after much difficulty.

Turning the situation over, if Kramnik offered a rematch to Kasparov, that would just as much be "handpicking" his opponent as if he had offered it to anyone else. You could argue that it would be more so, since a match with Kasparov would, by far, be the most lucrative.

Oct-30-06  Lt. Col. Majid: Quite frankly, it is dishonest not to talk of stupid for anyone to deny Danailov's malicious insinuation of Kramnik’s usage of Fritz in his press release.
Oct-30-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gypsy: < PeerGynt: ... Chessbase put that title "Danailov accused Kramnik of using Fritz ..." Therefore it was them who accused Kramnik, not Danailov. >

Nope, Chessbase accused Danailov. Your logic is legalistic, but stil flawed.

Chessbase reported on what Mr. Danailov said and how his words are commonly interpretted. Mr. Danailov never offered an alternative interpretation.

Oct-30-06  Sannder: <Peergynt> I think enough implicit information has been supplied to prove that Danailov and Topalov did accuse Kramnik of using a computer, apparently Fritz 9, they leave it for us to guess, but one might make an educated one, given the comptuer they decided to check Kramnik's games with.

Oct-30-06  Stevens: <The owner of the company producing F9 interpreted this as a comercial for F9 and promised F10 to nave at least 80% match with Kramnik's moves.> i think they were being sarcastic.

It was very clear what Danailov meant. If you are going to argue this point then your rationale is way to favoured toward Topalov. He accused Kramnik of cheating with an engine, then produced his laughable "proof" in the form of those statistics. To imply it was all twisted by chessbase is false. They were not the only ones to run the story, and they reproduced his press release word for word.

Oct-30-06  PeerGynt: <Gypsy: < PeerGynt: ... Chessbase put that title "Danailov accused Kramnik of using Fritz ..." Therefore it was them who accused Kramnik, not Danailov. > Nope, Chessbase accused Danailov. Your logic is legalistic, but stil flawed. >

That is correct. Chessbase accused Danilov of accusing Kramnik of using Fritz 9. As soon as I posted my post I saw the flawed logic, but was lazy enough to change it :)

Oct-30-06  drik: "Danilov did not mention anything about Kramnik using Frotz 9 in his press release."

So you are saying that Danailov complained to the FIDE appeals committee - because the opposition was playing too well?

Oct-30-06  PeerGynt: <drik: "Danilov did not mention anything about Kramnik using Frotz 9 in his press release." So you are saying that Danailov complained to the FIDE appeals committee - because the opposition was playing too well?>

All these complaints and press releases are available to the public. Just read them and you will see what was realy written and what was made up in someone's unstable mind.

Oct-30-06  PeerGynt: <Stevens: It was very clear what Danailov meant. If you are going to argue this point then your rationale is way to favoured toward Topalov. He accused Kramnik of cheating with an engine, then produced his laughable "proof" in the form of those statistics. To imply it was all twisted by chessbase is false. They were not the only ones to run the story, and they reproduced his press release word for word.>

We can interpret the facts as we please, because we are fans. Chessbase is supposed only to publish the news, but not to interpret them. For interpretations they can use special column, that clearly says this is someone's analisys, view point, opinion, etc. You cannot publish a document and put a misleading title on it.

Oct-30-06  PeerGynt: It looks to me that many people here strugle to recognise the symptoms of media brainwashing. In some sense the folks who lived in the Eastern Europe have better immunity agains it. I gave many examples here of Russians who were supporting Topa, because they were just able to see the PR machine behind the "news" and to elliminate the facts from the implied guesses.

Let me give you an example how subtle the propaganda in the Eastern Europe works and after that will discuss the Western media too.

Soon after the democratization in Bulgaria the country split into a pro-socialistic government and pro-democratic media. During this time the media was reporting the new this way "Today at 5 p.m. there was a big earthquake in India. Scores of people are feared dead. Bulgarian prime minister was seen to drink his coffee in the bar of the ministry building"

As you can see both news are unrelated, but put together they create come picture, don't they? In a month or two nobody will remember anything, but somewhere in the back of thier minds the voters will have this strange knowledge that the prime minister is a hartless person. They will not know why and who told them this, but they will know it from somewhere.

When I visited the Western Germany for the first time I was shocked by the movies people were watching about the Eastern Europe. All KGB agents had this animal look on their faces. The ladies were mostly ugly and even bearded, except the girl that James Bond will be banging by the end of the movie. All shots from London were made on a nice sunny day. All shots from Prague were made in a foggy black and white morning, somewhere in the poor suburbs. All this picture that Eastern Europe is a hellish place populated by animal-like half-human race, living in a dark nightmare was all over the movies.

Well by the end one can wonder how is it possible to combine the semen of an animal like man with the egg of a bearded woman and to get - Sharapova. But of cource the regular citisen of the West will never ask himself/herself such a question.

For the sake of truth I must admit that this brutal propaganda changed recently, but for many people the old reflex, seeing Eastern Europeans as some kind of half-human race, still remains.

Oct-30-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  ganstaman: <PeerGynt> Perhaps you have already said this and I missed it, but can you provide one reason for Danialov's comparison between Kramnik's and Fritz's moves besides an accusation of cheating.

Especially in light of the previous events, I can't think of any other acceptable explanation.

Oct-30-06  PeerGynt: <ganstaman: <PeerGynt> Perhaps you have already said this and I missed it, but can you provide one reason for Danialov's comparison between Kramnik's and Fritz's moves besides an accusation of cheating. Especially in light of the previous events, I can't think of any other acceptable explanation.>

I cannot think of any other explanation either, but this does not change the facts. I cannot think of any acceptible explanation for Kramnik's toilet visits other than the only explanation that comes to my mind. But his fans found it OK. So if we stay close to the facts we should say Kramnik did not cheat, Danailov did not accuse anybody. If we look for the sole possible explanation of the facts, we should say Kramnik cheated in that toilet and Danilov accused him of using Fritz. But we cannot have it both ways. This is what some Kramnik fans are trying to convince us.

Oct-30-06  Morales: PeerGynt: Although in the "toiletgate" episode I supported Kramnik, I share your concern with subliminal messages in media (not only agaist Eastern European people, of course; it is a old weapon used by left and right political rings, religious fanatics and so on).
Oct-30-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  chancho: <Topalov: The consequence was that starting from the sixth game I no longer knew whom I was playing against. Kramnik had been quite vulnerable in the past year, but in this match he hardly made any tactical mistakes. I began to have doubts. Was Kramnik my opponent or was it Kramnik assisted by a computer? In order to keep him at the board as much as possible I started playing very quickly. Too quickly sometimes. The blunder which caused me lose the ninth game was the result of a decision I had taken too quickly.”>

Topalov said that during a break at the Essent Tournament as far as I know.

Oct-30-06  Sannder: <If we look for the sole possible explanation of the facts, we should say Kramnik cheated in that toilet>.

No, I won't complain about any faulty logic here, I wan't to make another point: You view this too black and white actually. You are taking the purist view of literal interpretation. One has to at some point apply ones sense of what is reasonable, what interpretation is most logical.

Also, it is important to stick to the content of all published open letters. We should be able to agree that the contents of the open letters of Danailov and Hensel were all accurate reproductions of the originals. They ahve been published in the same form at various web pages.

Kramnik went to the toilet an above avarage number of times. The toilet is the only place where there is no camera. Thus , should Kramnik have been able to avoid been discovered despite all the procautions, many he himself wanted instated, he could have cheated in the bathroom. In that case, it is a possibility. One could believe this. IT is, due to the procautions a fairly difficult to believe point of view to me though. IT takes quite some stretch of imagination. I for one, would like a lot more proof than frequent bathroom visits, and a fairly weak quality of play from the accused side, to convince me of cheating.

It doesn't sound very likely to me, but with some assumptions it's a possible thought of course.

Now, when Danailov clearly uses the words "Strange, if not suspi"cious" , produces some fairly controversial Fritz 9 statistics, and both Topalov and Danailov in later interviews clearly stipulate that they suspected computer usage by Kramnik ("I didn't know who I was playing anymore, Kramnik or Kramnik with a computer", Topalov , interview with Duch Newspaper Algemeen Dagblad), I believe it is does not require much interpretation to conclude that Danailov means to say that Kramnik cheated.

You do not have to be so black and white about this.

Oct-30-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  ganstaman: <PeerGynt: <ganstaman: <PeerGynt> Perhaps you have already said this and I missed it, but can you provide one reason for Danialov's comparison between Kramnik's and Fritz's moves besides an accusation of cheating. Especially in light of the previous events, I can't think of any other acceptable explanation.> I cannot think of any other explanation either, but this does not change the facts. I cannot think of any acceptible explanation for Kramnik's toilet visits other than the only explanation that comes to my mind. But his fans found it OK. So if we stay close to the facts we should say Kramnik did not cheat, Danailov did not accuse anybody. If we look for the sole possible explanation of the facts, we should say Kramnik cheated in that toilet and Danilov accused him of using Fritz. But we cannot have it both ways. This is what some Kramnik fans are trying to convince us.>

I can think of a good explanation for Kramnik's toilet visits: the explanation he gave. Is it not plausible enough that he would like to use the extra room to walk around and think?

See, no need to have it both ways. You can stay consistent without having to say anything ridiculous.

Oct-30-06  Stevens: I think when one person accuses another of cheating/suspicous/unsportsman like behaviour, the onus is on them to support their claim. In england, we have a system that is based on innocent until proven guilty. That way, you can't just start accusing people of breaking laws without backing it up with something. There is still no evidence whatsoever that Kramnik was cheating. As has been made clear many times is that it was the fact that Kramnik was away from the table that unbalanced Topalov, and from there he tried any tactic to prevent Kramnik from doing so, ruining his public image and his subsequent play in the process. The revelation that they spent 3 evenings studying the video footage that they should never have been granted permission to see rightly outraged Kramnik.

Your point about subtle biasing in the media is very true though. It was a point well made. But in this case where the entire press releases were published, and the subsequent interviews with Topalov reveal that what the majority of us think happened, did happen.

Oct-30-06  Mameluk: <PeerGynt> <In some sense the folks who lived in the Eastern Europe have better immunity agains it.>

IM Semkov (Semi) from Bulgaria wrote on playchess recently, that in Bulgaria, the media persuaded 90% people that Kramnik cheated in the match.

In Eastern Europe, the journalists still have propagandist tendencies. Scary for me were excerpts of Yuri Vassiliev´s book about Kirsan the Great - I thought: Oh yes, good old times. I am Czech, and here would probably Vassiliev be considered an idiot by huge majority, but still you can see, that many journalists here do not objective work, but only propaganda. Mostly right wing propaganda this time.

Oct-30-06  PeerGynt: <Sannder: Now, when Danailov clearly uses the words "Strange, if not suspi"cious" , produces some fairly controversial Fritz 9 statistics, and both Topalov and Danailov in later interviews clearly stipulate that they suspected computer usage by Kramnik ("I didn't know who I was playing anymore, Kramnik or Kramnik with a computer", Topalov , interview with Duch Newspaper Algemeen Dagblad), I believe it is does not require much interpretation to conclude that Danailov means to say that Kramnik cheated.>

It is very easy to apply your logic for Kramnik too. Later he gave this two explanations for his visits 1) He used the toilet to walk, and 2) the air was fresher there. Both explanations are obvious absurd and insult to the common sense. So in this context we can say with high probability that he cheated and this is why he refused or was not able to give any reasonable explanation.

In the contrary, if we stick with the facts we can say "There is no evidence of Kramnik cheating regardles what the logical context implies. Danilov's press release does contain any direct accusation of cheating reagrdless of the context created by other interviews."

You see what the problem with these interviews is. They are translated interpreted thoughts of someone. What language Danilov and Topalov use giving the interviews. If it was Bulgarian why the order of the words does not look Bulgarian? How many Dutch-Bulgarian translators they have in Holland who know both languages equally well. Bulgarian is not Russian. Russian is a must for every country to have very qualified translators. Kramnik's translated interviews are much more credible, because they were given in his mother language and were translated from an official international language.

If Topalov and Danailov gave their interviews in English, how good their English is? I remember that video interview with Topalov where he struggeled to find the word "league" and said "type", which is not the same. Several more mistakes in the interview and we get completely didtorted picture of the person.

Oct-30-06  Open Defence: Imaginary conversation between Topa and Sylvio:

Topalov - I lost??!!!
Danailov - You didn't lose Kramnik cheated
Topalov -how could I lose??!!
Danailov - You can't lose you are the strongest player in the World Topalov - Yes I am the strongest!! yet??! he beat me??!! Danailov- because he cheated
Topalov - Yes this is suspicious

but I think it's possible that rather than irritate Kramnik (a welcome side effect perhaps) the main objective of the allegations was to reinforce Topalov's belief that he is a better chess player than Kramnik (ie. he only beat me because he cheated)

Oct-30-06  PeerGynt: <Mameluk: <PeerGynt> <In some sense the folks who lived in the Eastern Europe have better immunity agains it.> IM Semkov (Semi) from Bulgaria wrote on playchess recently, that in Bulgaria, the media persuaded 90% people that Kramnik cheated in the match. >

That is not true. Bulgarian media showed complete lack of professionalism during the match. They were making so many funny mistakes that one can write a book. They could not persuade even my baby to eat her breakfast (not that I can).

People were predisposed to trust Topalov as well as Semkov is a famous Topalov hater. The match did not change anything. And Danilov has never been loved in Bulgaria.

It was a normal reaction to defend our guy. Russians have saying "Nashih biut" (They are beating our guys). Which means we should first defend our friends and ask questions later.

Oct-30-06  Sannder: <Peergynt>

The explanations by Kramnik:
1), I agree a bit odd, but not impossible. The bathroom was quite large. It's not very strong though, I admit. 2) Perhaps the air was refreshed very well at the bathroom? Can you find any pictures of the interior of the bathroom? I can't:P

The interviews:

Interviews were given to three different news papers, all of them creditable and no sensationalist newspaper(well, maybe AD is a little sensationalist, but not in the non-football parts of the sports section): Volkskrant, Algemeen Dagblad and NRC Handelsblad. All interviews were conducted individually and each contained much the smae message, even very similar wording. So I think this adds a lot to the credibility of the interviews and the views expressed in them by Topalov.

I can see your concern, but you shouldn't put so much weight on them.

Oct-30-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  chancho: <PeerGynt: If Topalov and Danailov gave their interviews in English, how good their English is?.>

I don't know how good Danailov's english is, but Topalov seems to have a pretty good grasp of it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1_W3...

Oct-30-06  Mameluk: In Czech republic, I have seen such massmedia coverage about chess only when Kasparov lost to Deep Blue. Chess news were after the 5th game ahead of football, ice hockey, everything. Almost all journalists felt scandal and seemed to believe to Topalov: why to give such protest if it is not true, no? After the match started to run again and Kramnik was still using bathroom, journalists seemed completely confused, then stopped writing about the match at all and then made normal short articles about final result. But nonchessplayers in the trams and trains even talk about it and I hear people saying: that Kramnik, such a clear cheater, those Russians were always scoudrels, occupation, doping, etc:)

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