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V Mikenas 
Photograph courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.  
Vladas Jonovich Mikenas
Number of games in database: 488
Years covered: 1931 to 1988
Overall record: +138 -194 =156 (44.3%)*
   * Overall winning percentage = (wins+draws/2) / total games
      Based on games in the database; may be incomplete.

With the White pieces:
 Nimzo Indian (32) 
    E32 E23 E25 E33 E46
 King's Indian (28) 
    E75 E79 E67 E91 E62
 Orthodox Defense (25) 
    D50 D52 D63 D67 D55
 Sicilian (18) 
    B99 B43 B32 B49 B97
 English (17) 
    A18 A16 A19 A13 A15
 Queen's Pawn Game (12) 
    A40 A45 D02 A46 D04
With the Black pieces:
 Alekhine's Defense (41) 
    B03 B05 B02 B04
 Grunfeld (30) 
    D75 D81 D92 D83 D94
 Sicilian (18) 
    B32 B47 B29 B56 B58
 Queen's Pawn Game (16) 
    A40 D02 E00 A46 E10
 English (13) 
    A13 A15 A14 A11 A16
 French Defense (12) 
    C16 C07 C15 C05 C00
Repertoire Explorer

NOTABLE GAMES: [what is this?]
   V Mikenas vs N Lebedev, 1941 1-0
   V Mikenas vs Flohr, 1933 1-0
   V Mikenas vs Kotov, 1949 1-0
   V Mikenas vs Alekhine, 1935 1/2-1/2
   V Mikenas vs Maroczy, 1933 1-0
   Alekhine vs V Mikenas, 1937 0-1
   Keres vs V Mikenas, 1937 1/2-1/2
   V Mikenas vs Alekhine, 1939 1/2-1/2
   V Mikenas vs Flohr, 1938 1-0
   Levenfish vs V Mikenas, 1940 0-1

NOTABLE TOURNAMENTS: [what is this?]
   Rosario (1939)
   USSR Championship (1944)
   Hastings 1937/38 (1937)
   USSR Championship (1955)
   Kemeri (1937)
   USSR Championship (1962)
   USSR Championship (1950)
   USSR Championship (1940)
   USSR Championship (1949)
   USSR Championship (1957)
   USSR Championship (1970)
   USSR Championship (1965)

GAME COLLECTIONS: [what is this?]
   Vladas Mikenas - Lithuanian Legend by Resignation Trap
   Hastings 1937/38 by sneaky pete
   Rosario 1939 by Tabanus
   Malfurion's favorite games - QGD lines/ideas by Malfurion
   QCD games by Malfurion

Search Sacrifice Explorer for Vladas Jonovich Mikenas
Search Google for Vladas Jonovich Mikenas

(born Apr-17-1910, died Nov-03-1992, 82 years old) Estonia (federation/nationality Lithuania)

[what is this?]
Vladas Mikenas was awarded the IM title in 1950 and an honorary GM title in 1987. He was 4th at Kemeri 1939 and 1st at Lublin 1971 and played on five Lithuanian Olympiad teams from 1931 to 1939. Father of Alius Mikenas.

Wikipedia article: Vladas Mik%C4%97nas

 page 1 of 20; games 1-25 of 488  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. V Mikenas vs E Steiner  1-054 1931 Prague ol (Men)E24 Nimzo-Indian, Samisch
2. Rubinstein vs V Mikenas 1-066 1931 Prague ol (Men)D45 Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav
3. S Rosselli del Turco vs V Mikenas  0-122 1931 Prague ol (Men)D46 Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav
4. F Apsenieks vs V Mikenas  0-139 1931 Prague ol (Men)D67 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox Defense, Bd3 line
5. V Mikenas vs S Erdelyi  0-168 1931 Prague ol (Men)D04 Queen's Pawn Game
6. V Mikenas vs Weenink  ½-½36 1931 Prague ol (Men)D30 Queen's Gambit Declined
7. V Mikenas vs Alekhine  ½-½39 1931 Praha ol (04)D52 Queen's Gambit Declined
8. V Mikenas vs Yates  1-034 1931 Prague ol (Men)D52 Queen's Gambit Declined
9. M Golmayo De La Torriente vs V Mikenas  ½-½22 1931 Prague ol (Men)B29 Sicilian, Nimzovich-Rubinstein
10. V Mikenas vs Kashdan ½-½18 1931 OlympiadD51 Queen's Gambit Declined
11. Gruenfeld vs V Mikenas  ½-½42 1931 Prague ol (Men)D11 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
12. V Mikenas vs L Schmitt 1-026 1931 BrnoD67 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox Defense, Bd3 line
13. Vidmar vs V Mikenas 0-136 1931 Prague olD17 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
14. V Mikenas vs H Johner  0-136 1931 Prague ol (Men)E24 Nimzo-Indian, Samisch
15. V Mikenas vs Noteboom  1-051 1931 BrnoE38 Nimzo-Indian, Classical, 4...c5
16. Flohr vs V Mikenas 1-034 1931 Prague ol (Men)D17 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
17. Bogoljubov vs V Mikenas  1-054 1931 Prague ol (Men)B29 Sicilian, Nimzovich-Rubinstein
18. V Mikenas vs Flohr 1-020 1933 OlympiadB14 Caro-Kann, Panov-Botvinnik Attack
19. Alekhine vs V Mikenas 1-045 1933 Folkestone ol (10)B06 Robatsch
20. V Mikenas vs Maroczy 1-031 1933 OlympiadD67 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox Defense, Bd3 line
21. Sultan Khan vs V Mikenas 0-151 1933 OlympiadA38 English, Symmetrical
22. V Mikenas vs V Soultanbeieff  1-061 1933 OlympiadA34 English, Symmetrical
23. Kashdan vs V Mikenas 1-038 1933 OlympiadC42 Petrov Defense
24. S Rosselli del Turco vs V Mikenas 0-132 1933 OlympiadE70 King's Indian
25. V Mikenas vs W Fairhurst 0-149 1933 OlympiadD63 Queen's Gambit Declined, Orthodox Defense
 page 1 of 20; games 1-25 of 488  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2) | Mikenas wins | Mikenas loses  

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Apr-17-10  backrank: <Benzol> Thanks a lot! I wasn't aware of that game before! Black must have felt like a punching ball there.
Premium Chessgames Member
  jessicafischerqueen: Here is a photograph of <IM Vladas Mikenas> defeating <Alexander Aljechin> at the great <Kemeri 1937> tournament-

with the black pieces!

Photograph is of this game: Alekhine vs V Mikenas, 1937

In addition, <Mikenas> was one of the major theorists and practitioners of Aljechin's Defence (1.e4 Nf6). <Mikenas> published an influential monograph on this opening in <Chess in the USSR> magazine.

Here are all the games from <Kemeri 1937>, courtesy of User: Resignation Trap

Game Collection: Kemeri 1937 International Tournament

Mar-28-11  Lovuschka: He was a very beautiful and charming boy, as we can see from the photo. And he played great chess.

A shame that natural beauty is gone as of the 1937 photo Jessica posted.

May-31-12  Llawdogg: I'm sure he was a great couch!
Aug-21-12  LoveThatJoker: <Resignation Trap, whiteshark, JFQ> Excellent stuff on espousing that awesome link on Lithuanian Chess.

The portrait given both here on <CG> and the link you provided is great!

This picture is also pretty neat:


Sep-08-12  Karpova: Mikenas gave a Simul in Leningrad around 1934/35 with a bad result: +8 =6 -16

From page 13 of the 1935 'Neue Wiener Schachzeitung'

Premium Chessgames Member
  Abdel Irada: <Llawdogg: I'm sure he was a great couch!>

In later life, I understand he gained a lot of weight, and was thereafter more suitable for use as a bed.

Mar-12-15  hemy: His father name was Jonas, not Ivan.
In Lithuania everyone called him Vladas Jonovich, not Vladas Ivanovich. This great man deserves full respect. He would never accept the name Vladas Ivanovich. He was my coach from 1962 to 1967.
Premium Chessgames Member
  Annie K.: <hemy> thanks for the information. :)

(BTW, it's also confirmed by his native Wikipedia page:

Have you submitted a correction slip about it, or just posted here? Correction slips are the efficient way to go about these things. They are the links right under the kibitzing box, where it says "Spot an error? Please <suggest your correction> and help us eliminate database mistakes!"

Mar-12-15  hemy: <Annie K.> Thanks for advise. I will do it.

Yesterday I commented on game Vladas Mikenas vs Paul Keres V Mikenas vs Keres, 1949 that on the Wikipedia page about Mikenas in Lithuanian language, under the picture, placed his father's name: Tevas (father in Lithuanian) - Jonas Mikenas.

Premium Chessgames Member
  Annie K.: <hemy> Great! I didn't see your post on the game page. I also usually look at the "native Wikipedia" pages of players, even if I have to run them through Google Translate, because they often have more information than the English Wikipedia versions.

But there is nothing like help from an actual native - even given his father's name, I wouldn't have known that the correct usage is Jonovich, rather than Jonasovich, for example.

All such help and information are appreciated. And if you have any stories you can share about him, they would find many interested readers here too! :)

Mar-12-15  hemy: <Annie K.>In Vilnius Chess Club Vladas Mikenas was speaking Russian, because this was a language that most of club members were using, among them Jews, Russians, Lithuanians and Poles. In Russian language the common way to call person by name is his given name followed by his father's name. In Russian his full name was Vladas Jonovich Mikenas, but one would call him Vladas Jonovich. Lithuanians usually call people only by their given names. In Lithuanian his full name was Vladas Jono Mikenas, but the person who was speking with him would call him "ponas Mikenas" (mister Mikenas) or Vladas. To respect him as a Lithuanian, his name in English should by Vladas Mikenas.
Premium Chessgames Member
  Annie K.: Oh, I see! So maybe the 'Ivanovich' version isn't just a simple mistake, but rather a further "Russianization" of his name? Since I have never seen Jon or Jonas as a Russian name, and Ivan does seem to be the closest Russian equivalent.

I'm not sure the middle name should be dispensed with completely, (chessgames sometimes uses middle names for disambiguation purposes), but at least Jonovich certainly sounds like an improvement. I think most people know him as Vladas Mikenas anyway. :)

Mar-12-15  hemy: <Annie K.>It is possible that someone created "russian version" of his name. I personally didn't see this version (Vladas Ivanovich) in newspapers, magazines or chess books, include book of Dvorkovich "Vladas Mikenas".

Not always the names were "translated" to Russian.
Michail Tal was known as Michail Nechemjevich Tal (Михаил Нехемьевич Таль). His fathers name was as my first name - Nechemia.

Anyway, Jono is not exactly middle name, it is father's name extension to his given name in formal documents.

Mar-12-15  hemy: Interesting story about the game Alekhine - Mikenas, Kemeri 1937 you can found in the article It was taken from this game comments of Vladas Mikenas published in book of Dvorkovich. After this game Alekhine not only didn't speak with Mikenas 3 days. When Mikenas was in bad position in one of his following games, Alekhine brought some spectators and told very laud: "Watch to what weak player I lost!".

Mikenas finished this super tornament (Samuel Reshevsky, Vladimirs Petrovs, Salo Flohr, Alexander Alekhine, Paul Keres, Endre Steiner, Saviely Tartakower, Reuben Fine, Gideon Ståhlberg and other strong players) with 8 points from 17.

Premium Chessgames Member
  Annie K.: <Michail Tal was known as Michail Nechemjevich Tal>

Guess they gave up on it - there isn't any Russian name even remotely similar to Nechemia, as far as I know. ;p

Thanks, btw, I couldn't figure out what your username might mean! :)

<Anyway, Jono is not exactly middle name, it is father's name extension to his given name in formal documents.>

Yes, a patronymic.

Heh - he has a Romanian namesake too: Vlad Ionescu!

Nobody ever accused Alekhine of having good manners, I think... :s

Mar-13-15  Retireborn: <hemy> Thanks for that. Alekhine sounds a bit like Viktor Korchnoi there!
Mar-13-15  hemy: <Retireborn> Viktor Korchnoi was very kind by taking the seat of Andrei Lukin and analyzing with me the final position of my game with Lukin (Lithuania - Leningrad, 1967)

I have only good memories of this big chess player.

Mar-13-15  Retireborn: <hemy> Once again, I can only envy you!
Mar-22-15  hemy: <Annie K.> <Retireborn> I'm glad that Vladas Jonovich Mikenas got back his real father's name.
No more Vladas Ivanovich.
Premium Chessgames Member
  Annie K.: Congrats, good work. :)
Premium Chessgames Member
  Domdaniel: Somebody should also submit <hemy>'s win vs Roman Dzindzichashvili to the CG database ...

<The most memorable game I played against GM Roman Dzindzichashvili in December 1978, when he was ranked between top 20 in the world.

[Event "Rishon Le Zion Jubilee tournament"]
[Site "Rishon Le Zion"]
[Date "1978.12.25"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Kasimov, Nechemia"]
[Black "Dzindzichashvili, Roman"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "A49"]
[Annotator "Kasimov,Nechemia"]
[PlyCount "121"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 g6 3. g3 Bg7 4. Bg2 O-O 5. b3 d6 6. Bb2 c6 7. Nbd2 Qa5 8. O-O Qh5 9. Ne1 c5 10. e3 Qxd1 11. Rxd1 cxd4 12. exd4 Nc6 13. Nc4 Bg4 14. f3 Be6 15. Ne3 Nb4 16. Nd3 Nfd5 17. Nxd5 Nxd5 18. Rfe1 b5 19. c4 bxc4 20. bxc4 Nb6 21. d5 Bf5 22. Bxg7 Kxg7 23. c5 Na4 24. Nf4 Nxc5 25. Rxe7 Rfe8 26. Rde1 Kf8 27. Rxe8+ Rxe8 28. Rxe8+ Kxe8 29. Kf2 Bb1 30. a3 Ba2 31. Ke3 Na4 32. Kd4 Nb6 33. h4 h6 34. Bf1 Ke7 35. Bd3 Kf6 36. Be4 Nc4 37. a4 Nb6 38. a5 Nc4 39. a6 Nb6 40. Nd3 Bc4 41. Nb4 Bb5 42. Bd3 Bd7 43. f4 Ke7 44. Be2 Kd8 45. h5 Kc7 46. hxg6 fxg6 47. Bd3 g5 48. f5 h5 49. f6 Kd8 50. Nc6+ Bxc6 51. dxc6 h4 52. gxh4 gxh4 53. Bf5 Na8 54. Kd5 Nc7+ 55. Kxd6 Nb5+ 56. Ke5 Nc7 57. Bd7 h3 58. Bxh3 Nxa6 59. Kd6 Nc7 60. f7 Nb5+ 61. Kc5 1-0 >

Nov-27-15  hemy: <Domdaniel> If you wish I can email you pdf of the Eugenijus Paleckis book "Žydai Lietuvos šachmatų istorijoje" (Jews in Lithuanian chess history).

My game with Dzindzichashvili is on the pages 312-313 of this book. I can also provide you Lithuanian language chess notation.

On the pages 303-305 published my game against Latvian Alvis Vitolinsh (Alvis Vitolinsh). I mentioned about this game because it was published by Vladas Mikenas in newspaper "Sportas", 1964 m. January 21 th, Nr. 8 (1077). I lost this game, but Mikenas stated that "it is not only number of points scored by young chess players matters, and not all of them have the same value". On move 29 I could win the game and with 2 rounds before end of the tournament to stay on the 1st place, 1/2 points before Vitolins and 1 point before Viktor Kupreichik (Viktor Kupreichik). 2 winners of this tournament were invited to USSR youth team. I finished on the 3rd place.

Premium Chessgames Member
  Domdaniel: <hemy> Thank you, but I must decline for now. I already have more chess material than I can cope with.

Incidentally, have you played Lev Psakhis, another Rishon resident? I used to have five (!) of his books on the French Def., and admired them greatly. GM Baburin, a friend of his, told me that he had been seriously ill, but was improving.

Premium Chessgames Member
  moronovich: Hats of to a man who has defeated the great Dzindzichasvili !
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