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Aronian 
Photograph copyright © Fred Lucas, www.fredlucas.eu  
Levon Aronian
Number of games in database: 1,870
Years covered: 1993 to 2014
Last FIDE rating: 2793 (2813 rapid, 2850 blitz)
Highest rating achieved in database: 2830
Overall record: +494 -186 =688 (61.3%)*
   * Overall winning percentage = (wins+draws/2) / total games
      Based on games in the database; may be incomplete.
      502 exhibition games, odds games, etc. are excluded from this statistic.

MOST PLAYED OPENINGS
With the White pieces:
 Slav (88) 
    D15 D10 D11 D12 D17
 King's Indian (69) 
    E60 E61 E63 E62 E92
 Queen's Pawn Game (63) 
    E10 A45 A41 E00 D01
 Sicilian (61) 
    B23 B90 B50 B33 B30
 Queen's Indian (54) 
    E15 E17 E16 E12 E14
 Semi-Slav (50) 
    D45 D43 D44 D47 D48
With the Black pieces:
 Ruy Lopez (237) 
    C67 C84 C89 C88 C65
 Ruy Lopez, Closed (106) 
    C84 C89 C88 C87 C90
 Sicilian (100) 
    B22 B90 B70 B51 B76
 Queen's Gambit Declined (74) 
    D37 D38 D31 D39 D30
 Grunfeld (59) 
    D85 D91 D76 D94 D77
 Semi-Slav (47) 
    D45 D44 D47 D43
Repertoire Explorer

NOTABLE GAMES: [what is this?]
   Aronian vs Anand, 2007 1-0
   A Giri vs Aronian, 2012 0-1
   I Sokolov vs Aronian, 2006 0-1
   Shirov vs Aronian, 2006 0-1
   Aronian vs V Popov, 2005 1-0
   Aronian vs Morozevich, 2006 1-0
   Anand vs Aronian, 2008 0-1
   Aronian vs Svidler, 2011 1-0
   McShane vs Aronian, 2012 0-1
   Aronian vs Nakamura, 2010 1-0

WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS: [what is this?]
   FIDE World Championship Knockout Tournament (2004)
   FIDE World Championship Tournament (2007)

NOTABLE TOURNAMENTS: [what is this?]
   Candidates Match: Aronian - Carlsen (2007)
   Linares 2006 (2006)
   41st World Junior Championships (2002)
   4th FIDE Grand Prix (2009)
   20th Amber Tournament (Blindfold) (2011)
   FIDE Grand Prix (2008)
   Tata Steel (2012)
   Tata Steel (2014)
   Gibraltar Masters (2005)
   FIDE Jermuk Grand Prix (2009)
   Tata Steel (2013)
   5th Individual European Chess Championship (2004)
   6th European Individual Championship (2005)
   16th Amber Tournament (Blindfold) (2007)
   FIDE World Cup (2005)

GAME COLLECTIONS: [what is this?]
   Aronian's Games 4 Study by jakaiden
   Guess-the-Move Chess: 2000-2010 (Part 1) by Anatoly21
   Match Aronian! by amadeus
   English: Levon Aronian Collection by chess.master
   Exchange sacs - 2 by obrit
   ARONIAN: TACTICAL GENIUS by notyetagm
   Book of Samurai's favorite games 3 by Book of Samurai
   Book of Five Rings' favorite games by Book of Five Rings
   D45 QGD: Semi-Slav [White] by chess.master
   GP by acirce
   Match Carlsen! by amadeus
   Art of War's favorite games by Art of War
   Levon Aronian Great Games by Bufon
   positionalgenius' favorite games by positionalgenius

Search Sacrifice Explorer for Levon Aronian
Search Google for Levon Aronian
FIDE player card for Levon Aronian


LEVON ARONIAN
(born Oct-06-1982, 32 years old) Armenia

[what is this?]
Levon Grigorievich Aronian was born in Yerevan and learned to play chess when he was nine years old. He is a former U12 (1994) and Junior (U20) World Champion (2002), became an International Master in 1996 at 13, and became a Grandmaster in 2000 at 17. He has been a Candidate on four occasions: 2007, 2011, 2013 and 2014.

Championships

<Age> In 1994, he won the World Under-12 Championship in Szeged with 8/9, ahead of future top-ten players Ruslan Ponomariov, Alexander Grischuk, Etienne Bacrot as well as Francisco Vallejo-Pons. In 2001, he was runner up in the World Junior Championship with 9.5/13 just behind Peter Acs and went one better in 2002, when he became World Junior Champion, scoring 10/13 and finishing ahead of Surya Shekhar Ganguly, Artyom Timofeev, Luke McShane, Bu Xiangzhi, and Pentala Harikrishna.

<Nationals> He was runner up in the Armenian Championship in 2001 behind Smbat Gariginovich Lputian before improving in 2002 by winning the Armenian Championship.

<Continental> A regular participant at the European Individual Championships since their inception, he came =4th in 2003 with 8.5/13 behind the winner Zurab Azmaiparashvili, and the joint runners up Alexander (Nenashev) Graf and Vladimir Malakhov; in 2004 he came =3rd a half point behind joint leaders Vassily Ivanchuk and Predrag Nikolic and in 2005 he came =3rd, a point behind Liviu Dieter Nisipeanu and a half point behind 2nd place getter Teimour Radjabov.

<World> Aronian took part in the FIDE World Championship Knockout Tournament (2004) in Tripoli, eliminating Magnus Carlsen and Gadir Guseinov before losing his third-round match with Pavel Smirnov. He capped a highly successful 2005 by winning the FIDE World Cup (2005) in December, without loss of a single game. After beating Ali Frhat, Darmen Sadvakasov, Alexander Areshchenko and Francisco Vallejo Pons in the preliminary 4 rounds, he disposed of Mikhail Gurevich in the quarter finals and Bacrot in the semi finals before defeating Ponomariov in the final round. His World Cup victory qualified him for the Candidates Tournament of the World Chess Championship 2007, being played in May–June 2007. In this tournament he played Magnus Carlsen in the Candidates Match: Aronian - Carlsen (2007), and they tied 3-3 in the initial six games, then 2-2 in rapid chess, before Aronian finally prevailed 2-0 in the blitz deciders. In the finals, he won the Candidates Match: Aronian - Shirov (2007) by 3½-2½. This qualified him for the final stage of the championship, the FIDE World Championship Tournament (2007) in Mexico City. There, he scored only six points out of 14, finishing seventh out of eight players, with Viswanathan Anand becoming the World Chess Champion.

Aronian easily won the FIDE Grand Prix 2008–2010, qualifying him for the World Championship Candidates (2011). He was was eliminated from the latter contest in the first round when he fell to Alexander Grischuk in the rapid game playoff 1.5-2.5 (+1 =1 -2) after tieing the classical games 2-2 (+0 =4 -0). Aronian qualified via his rating for the right to play in the World Championship Candidates (2013) that was played in London in March 2013. He was in contention for first for most of the tournament, but he lost some games late in the tournament to place 3rd with 8/14, half a point behind the leaders Carlsen and Vladimir Kramnik respectively. He was seeded into the World Chess Championship Candidates (2014) by rating, as he met the condition that he must first participate in the World Cup (2013), where he defeated Kyrgyzstani IM Mikhail Markov in the first round and Igor Lysyj in the second round but lost to eventual semi-finalist GM Evgeny Tomashevsky in the third round. At the Candidates that were held in March 2014 in Khanty-Mansiysk, Aronian was in strong contention for the lead until round 9, but then crashed to score only 3 draws in the last 6 rounds to finish 6th in the final standings.

Tournaments

<Classical> At the International Open at Capelle-La-Grande in 2001, Aronian scored 7/9, half a point behind the joint leaders Einar J Gausel and Vladimir Chuchelov . At Lausanne a few months later, he won the Young Masters tournament ahead of Harikrishna. In 2002, he was equal first in the International Open in Bad Wiessee and was also =1st in the International Neckar Opens held in Deizisau in Germany in 2002 and 2003. In 2004, he was =1st in the Reykjavik Open and 2005 proved to be Aronian's most successful year thus far - it saw him gain over 50 FIDE rating points to claim a spot in the top 10 and a 2724 rating on the July list. He was joint first with Zahar Efimenko, Kiril D Georgiev, Alexey Shirov and Emil Sutovsky at the Gibraltar Masters (2005), outright first at the Karabakh International (2005) and won the World Cup (see above). He went on to even greater successes in 2006: after achieving a modest result in Corus Wijk aan Zee (2006), he won in the last round of Linares (2006) to take first place by half a point ahead of and Veselin Topalov. Toward the end of the year he shared first place in the Tal Memorial (2006) 2006 with Peter Leko , and then followed up in 2007 with a joint victory with Topalov and Radjabov at the category 19 Corus (2007). The year 2008 started with a great success at Corus (2008) where he shared first place with Carlsen, scoring 8/13, and continued strongly as he came =3rd at Morelia-Linares (2008), and won the FIDE Grand Prix (2008) in Sochi and the 4th FIDE Grand Prix (2009) in Nalchik. Along with his joint second place score in the FIDE Jermuk Grand Prix (2009), Aronian secured his place in the candidates tournament by winning the FIDE Grand Prix series in just three of the four events each player was slated to attend. He also came =2nd behind Topalov at the Bilbao Grand Slam Chess Final (2008) tournament alongside Ivanchuk and Carlsen with 5/10 and finished 2008 with outright second behind Topalov with 5.5/10 at the Pearl Spring Chess Tournament (2008).

In 2009 he came =2nd with 7.5/13 at Corus a half point behind Sergey Karjakin and alongside Sergei Movsesian and Radjabov, took clear first place with four wins, one draw, and one loss in the 2nd Grand Slam Masters Bilbao Final (2009). In November 2009, he competed in the Tal Memorial (2009), at the time the strongest tournament in history (in terms of average Elo, 2763). He finished fourth with 5/9, and in the final round memorably demolished world champion Viswanathan Anand with the Black pieces in just 25 moves. He was 3rd at Linares (2010) behind Topalov and Grischuk and in September 2010, he played in the preliminary stage of the Bilbao Grand Slam in Shanghai, the Shanghai Masters (2010), against Vladimir Kramnik, Alexei Shirov, and Wang Hao, but could not qualify for the final tournament after losing to Kramnik in an Armageddon game after they drew the tiebreaker match. In November 2010, he finished shared first with Shakhriyar Mamedyarov and Karjakin at the category XXI Tal Memorial (2010). He started 2011 with a joint third with Carlsen in the Tata Steel (2011) (formerly Corus) super tournament behind Hikaru Nakamura and Anand, scoring 8/13 with a 2821 performance rating. In November 2011, he came second in the category 22 Tal Memorial (2011) with 5.5/9 (+2 =7 -0 and TPR of 2853) on tiebreak behind Magnus Carlsen, and in December 2011 he broke even at the London Chess Classic (2011) with 4/8 (+1 -1 =6). Aronian started 2012 with his first outright win at Wijk aan Zee scoring 9/13 (+7 -2 =4; TPR of 2891) at the category 21 Tata Steel (2012) and then placed =4th at the category 22 Tal Memorial (2012) with 4.5/9 followed by 3rd at the Bilbao Masters (2012) in October. He finished 2012 with a disappointing 3.5/8 at the London Chess Classic (2012), placing 6th out of 9 and losing his world number 2 ranking.

However, 2013 saw Aronian placing clear second behind Carlsen at the category 20 Tata Steel (2013) event, scoring 8.5/13 and signalling a strong return to form prior to the Candidates Tournament that was held in March 2013. Subsequent to the Candidates, Aronian won the category 20 Alekhine Memorial (2013) with 5.5/9 on tiebreak ahead of Boris Gelfand and then placed =4th at the category 21 Norway Chess Tournament (2013), scoring 5/9. In September he placed 3rd in the category 22 DRR Sinquefield Cup (2013) quadrangular tournament behind Magnus Carlsen and Hikaru Nakamura, falling below 2800 for the first time since September 2010. However, he recovered his form and his 2800 rating in a major hitout in the lead up to the 2014 Candidates by winning the category XXI quadrangular DRR Bilbao Masters (2013) using the "soccer scoring" system wherein his +2 =4 translated into an outright first with 10 points ahead of the 9 points (+2 -1 =3) scored by runner up Michael Adams. Possibly the best result of his career came when he won the category 20 Tata Steel (2014) event with a round to spare, the final score being 8/11, a point and a half clear of the field. He placed 2nd behind Carlsen in the category 23 standard time Zurich Chess Challenge (2014), even after losing his 5th round game to Loek van Wely. Immediately before the standard time event he was =1st with Carlsen in the preliminary Zurich Chess Challenge (Blitz) (2014) which determined the draw. He placed 3rd in the Zurich Chess Challenge (Rapid) (2014), which when combined with the results in the main event provided him with an overall placement of 2nd, again behind Carlsen. His next major event was the Sinquefield Cup (2014), and which produced a relatively poor result by his standards, 5th placement with 4/10.

<Chess960> In 2003 Aronian won the Finet Chess960 open at Mainz; this qualified him for a match against Chess960 World Champion Peter Svidler at Mainz the following year, a match which he lost 4½-3½. He won the Finet Chess960 open tournament again in 2005 which earned him a rematch with Svidler in 2006, and this time he won the match this time 5-3 in an 8-game match to become Chess960 World Champion. In 2007 he successfully defended his title of Chess960 World Champion by beating Anand, but lost the title in 2009 to Nakamura.

Olympiad

Aronian played for Armenia in the 1996 Olympiad in Yerevan, the 36th Olympiad (2004) in Calvia, the 37th Chess Olympiad (2006) in Turin, the 38th Olympiad (2008) in Dresden, the 39th Chess Olympiad (2010) in Khanty-Mansiysk, the Chess Olympiad (2012) in Istanbul and in the Chess Olympiad (2014) held in Tromsø. He helped the team to a bronze medal in 2004 and to gold medals in 2006, 2008 and 2012. In the 2010 Olympiad he won the silver medal for his individual performance on board one and in 2012 he went one better to win gold on top board.

Teams

Always a team player, Aronian has played in the German Bundesliga, the Israeli National League, in the Dutch, Spanish and French Team championships, in the European Club Cup as well as the World Team Championship (2005) and World Team Championship (2010). In the Russian Team Championship in 2005, he scored 7.5/9 with an Elo performance rating of around 2850, and in the World Chess Team Championship (2011) he lead Armenia to gold, scoring a personal silver for top board with his 5/8 (TPR 2826). He has played for Armenia in the European Team Championships in 1999 (winning team gold), 2005, 2007 (individual silver), 2009. He lead Armenia to fourth place in the European Team Championship (2011) and in the European Team Championship (2013), winning individual silver and bronze on board 1 in 2011 and 2013 respectively. He also won an individual gold playing top board for Armenia in the FIDE World Team Championship (2013).

Match

In April 2012, Aronian and Vladimir Kramnik, as part of their preparation for the 2013 Candidates Tournament, played a six-game training match in Zurich. The Kramnik - Aronian (2012) match was drawn 3-3 (+1 -1 =4).

Rapids

Aronian is a worthy successor to Anand in the rapid play versions of the game, and a fierce rival of Carlsen and Nakamura. In May 2007 he won 4-2 in the Kramnik - Aronian Rapid Match (2007). He also won the 2009 World Rapid Championship when he took out the Chess Classic Mainz (rapid) (2009), and then followed up by winning the World Blitz Championship (2010) with 24.5/38, clinching the title with a round to spare. In March 2008 he won the 17th Melody Amber blindfold/rapid tournament held in Nice, France, 2½ points ahead of the other nearest competitors. Apart from his first place win in the overall tournament, he also took sole first place in the Amber Tournament (Rapid) (2008) section of the tournament (winning by a margin of 1½ points) and shared first place in the Amber Tournament (Blindfold) (2008) section with Kramnik, Alexander Morozevich, and Topalov. In March 2009 he again won at the Melody Amber tournament, scoring a combined 14 points in 22 games, and sharing the lead in both sections. In 2011, he won the 20th Amber Tournament (Blindfold) (2011) with 8.5/11 by a clear point and a half, and came second behind Carlsen in the 20th Amber Tournament (Rapid) (2011) section with 7/11 to take the overall prize for the third time. In June 2008, Aronian won the Karen Asrian Memorial (2008) rapid chess tournament in Yerevan, finishing with 8½/14 ahead of second placed Peter Leko. In August 2010, he attempted to defend the World Rapid Chess title, but lost to eventual champion American Gata Kamsky.

In December 2013, he placed =1st at the SportAccord World Mind Games (Men, Blitz) (2013) with 19.5/30. In June 2014, he was =2nd behind Carlsen at the FIDE World Rapid Championship (2014).

Awards

Aronian was declared the best sportsman of Armenia in 2005 and in December 2009 was awarded the title of "Honoured Master of Sport of the Republic of Armenia".

Rating

Aronian's FIDE ratings as at 1 October 2014 are:

<Standard>: 2793, making him Armenia's top player, and the world #5. He is only one of seven players to officially cross the 2800 boundary, the others being Garry Kasparov, Kramnik, Anand, Topalov and Carlsen, and Fabiano Caruana;

<Rapid>: 2813 (world #4); and

<Blitz>; 2850 (world #4).

After Aronian's round 4 victory over US super-GM Hikaru Nakamura in the Zurich Chess Challenge standard time event on 2 February 2014, his live rating reached a new personal best of 2835.5.

Other

His handle on the Internet Chess Club (ICC) is "L-Aronian".

Sources and references

Live rating: http://www.2700chess.com/; Extended interview on WhyChess on 21 Sep 2011: http://whychess.org/node/1960; Wikipedia article: Levon Aronian

Last updated 2 Oct 2014


 page 1 of 75; games 1-25 of 1,870  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. A Boldyrev vs Aronian  ½-½45 1993 Wch U12B20 Sicilian
2. Aronian vs A Zabojlovich 1-034 1993 Wch U12B23 Sicilian, Closed
3. Aronian vs I Khamrakulova 1-034 1993 Wch U12A45 Queen's Pawn Game
4. N F Nur vs Aronian  0-134 1993 Wch U12B70 Sicilian, Dragon Variation
5. Ngo Ngoc Quang vs Aronian 0-132 1993 Wch U12E60 King's Indian Defense
6. D Kozlenkov vs Aronian 1-042 1993 Wch U12C63 Ruy Lopez, Schliemann Defense
7. Aronian vs M Sitnik 1-041 1993 Ch World (cadets) (under 12)C55 Two Knights Defense
8. Aronian vs S Munizaba 1-038 1993 Wch U12B23 Sicilian, Closed
9. A Horvath vs Aronian 1-056 1993 Wch U12B78 Sicilian, Dragon, Yugoslav Attack, 10.castle long
10. Aronian vs Das Neves 0-158 1993 Wch U12D01 Richter-Veresov Attack
11. E Shaposhnikov vs Aronian 1-060 1993 Wch U12B55 Sicilian, Prins Variation, Venice Attack
12. E Kobylkin vs Aronian  0-149 1994 EU-ch U12D86 Grunfeld, Exchange
13. Bacrot vs Aronian 0-140 1994 WYFWC Szeged B12(8)B22 Sicilian, Alapin
14. Aronian vs O Kondarevich  1-048 1994 EUch U12 DisneyC16 French, Winawer
15. G Szabo vs Aronian  0-129 1994 EU-ch U12B22 Sicilian, Alapin
16. H Geanta vs Aronian  1-042 1994 Wch U12C63 Ruy Lopez, Schliemann Defense
17. Aronian vs D Mastrovasilis 0-116 1994 EU-ch U12B80 Sicilian, Scheveningen
18. C Mamedov vs Aronian 0-145 1994 EUch U12 DisneyB78 Sicilian, Dragon, Yugoslav Attack, 10.castle long
19. Aronian vs D Bunzmann  1-025 1994 Wch U12B23 Sicilian, Closed
20. Aronian vs N Shavtvaladze 0-141 1994 EU-ch U12B52 Sicilian, Canal-Sokolsky (Rossolimo) Attack
21. Aronian vs J Mont-Reynaud  1-052 1994 Wch U12D01 Richter-Veresov Attack
22. E Khalilov vs Aronian  0-133 1994 EU-ch U12A07 King's Indian Attack
23. Aronian vs P De Bortoli 1-021 1994 EUch U12 DisneyD01 Richter-Veresov Attack
24. Ponomariov vs Aronian 0-155 1994 Wch U12B53 Sicilian
25. Aronian vs A Bokros  1-037 1994 Wch U12A45 Queen's Pawn Game
 page 1 of 75; games 1-25 of 1,870  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2) | Aronian wins | Aronian loses  
 

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 95 OF 135 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Nov-20-08  VaselineTopLove: <Why does woman have to "catch up with" the men??>

They don't have to, if they don't want to. But as Kasparov pointed out, many fields are dominated by men and hardly by women and there exists a huge difference between the achievements of men and women in these fields, and perhaps this is more due to upbringing/conditioning than any inherent differences or perhaps conditioning overtime creates such inherent differences. Anyway what Kasparov and even I mean to say is that you cannot suddenly expect women to achieve dramatic results in all these fields even if you provided all the resources and encouragement to them. Because women have been conditioned, directly in their homes, or indirectly (through other forms of media) to think and act in a certain manner and so all this has to be unlearned, undone. Women may have other priorities, such as having children and raising them and this will certainly affect their careers, as it does with everyone else's.

Citing people like Judit Polgar won't help because she's an anomaly, an exception to the general rule that has so far held true. Exceptions won't boost your case. It will be several years before we see more women holding GM and Super GM titles and dominating the Top 10, but by then chess may have died out or evolved into something new.

Another example of what Aronian mean't by women lacking the fighting spirit is a recent poll which showed why women on average are paid less salaries than men. It revealed that women accept whatever is given to them, instead of negotiating for higher, like men do. So if women don't take the initiative then they aren't going to break the barrier.

Nov-20-08  Ladolcevita: <Vase>
Of course citing Judit is sufficient and valid,as long as she is a female.And it just proves how far can a female go along in chess when she is educated in a proper way.Exception is not the point,the point is why she is an exception,and exception is not invalid,but is subject to what point we are proving.
Nov-20-08  Riverbeast: For the record, according to cg.com Judit Polgar's head to head record against Aronian is 2 wins, 2 draws, 0 losses

Although admittedly, all but one of those games were over 5 years ago

I'm not sure if I agree that women are necessarily 'more emotional' than men...It's a common stereotype in the West...But in certain Eastern cultures they consider men to be the more sensitive and emotional sex (deep down), and women more cold and calculating!

Just a thought

Nov-20-08  VaselineTopLove: <Of course citing Judit is sufficient and valid,as long as she is a female.And it just proves how far can a female go along in chess when she is educated in a proper way.Exception is not the point,the point is why she is an exception,and exception is not invalid,but is subject to what point we are proving.>

No it's not sufficient. You don't cite exceptions to prove your point. Maybe she really did have a natural knack for the game and it clicked. She was someone who had the natural ability and was fortunate to be exposed to the right circumstances and it worked out on the whole. Now her priorities have changed and she has slipped in the rankings after becoming a mother. So with women, it's hard to be emotionally consistent as their priorities tend to change over time for whatever reason.

Exposing many women to the same training conditions may not create another Judit Polgar, if they are not deeply passionate (think Fischer, Kasparov) about the game and/or do not possess a natural ability, right mental frame for it. There is something called the unexplainable factor which makes every player unique. It's not an equation where if you plug all the numbers you get the desired result, because of the existence of this "unknown/unexplainable" factor.

That's like suggesting that if every child was brought up the way Einstein was, they should grow up to be Nobel Prize winners. You can't cite exceptions because if everyone became an exception, there would be nothing spectacular about it and the word "exception" would not exist in the dictionary.

Nov-20-08  Ladolcevita: <RiverBeast>
I think you might misunderstand what Mr.Aronian said. He is just saying chess is a battle game,and women tends to love peace and may consider chess a tiny teeny nonsense compared to something like"children""romance""husband",ect,so they probably say"i'm a woman,i just play chess in a fashion,and i am not interested in deep digging".... And thats why,generally women---which means not this girl,that women,but a whole concept---and chess dont hit on so well like males do. So we can conclude that women and men have different sexual diverge,and they might be suitable for different things at this phaze in history(which means the sexual feature would change and evolve along the time).But still,as for one women,and one man,playing chess is totally a personal choice and with a individual prospect. <Vase>Can you say any of those super grandmasters not belong to exceptions?? So they are all exceptions,and at this level,we say women can achieve very high like men too.
Nov-20-08  VaselineTopLove: <<Vase>Can you say any of those super grandmasters not belong to exceptions?? So they are all exceptions,and at this level,we say women can achieve very high like men too.>

If by a Super GM you mean someone who has broken the 2700 barrier, then since there are many male Super GMs, it's no longer considered to be as exceptional as it once was. Because the bar is being set higher as time passes. So maybe we will have 2750 as the new cutoff to be considered as a Super GM. Many men have crossed the 2700 barrier but how many women have come even close to matching or breaking Judit Polgar's record despite an increase in playing opportunities and funding/resources available to them?

Nov-20-08  VaselineTopLove: I'm not denying that women can't achieve as high as men can, but do they seriously want to? i.e. are they passionate, eccentric about the game, that they are willing to sacrifice a lot of other things in their lives and play risky, attacking chess with dedication and perseverance, and with consistent emotions?

Nov-20-08  shintaro go: <I'm not denying that women can't achieve as high as men can, but do they seriously want to? i.e. are they passionate, eccentric about the game> Yes, I don't think there are as many passionate women as there are passionate men about chess. Men can think, live and breathe chess their whole lives. I don't think women can do the same.
Nov-21-08  actinia: this discussion is silly.
as female interest in chess grows, the number of female IMs, female GMs, female 2600+s, and female 2700+s will grow in proportion in the upcoming decades.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...

Nov-21-08  karoaper: <Davolni: Karo jan bari or.

et haxordume "Armenia" alikov er, mi kani or araj.

chem karcum online klini eti.

kez el bari galust, inchkan gitem nor es che es site-um.> Hey bro, I just saw this.
Mersi aper.

Nov-21-08  Open Defence: <I don't think women can do the same.> they can, but very few seem to want to
Nov-21-08  Riverbeast: <Men can think, live and breathe chess their whole lives. I don't think women can do the same.>

Which just proves that women are smarter than men ;-)

Nov-21-08  Open Defence: I wont argue with that <RB>
Nov-21-08  khursh: Aronian raises interesting aspect towards chess which was never said before: That chess is more re emotions than re brain /especially when he mentions about math/

Can we claim that man and women should equally love chess? Its the same as to claim that man and women should equally love every movie, sport, book, drama, etc because .... they are equal :) There are many gender illiterate people who think that man=women and they immediately react and label sexism to whatever is said in contradiction to this really stupid stereotype /counter-stereotype/.

Moreover, Aronian continues saying that woman have capacity to play good chess but they should change their character /emotional aspect/ This is indeed arguable but very interesting point of view.

People in business know very well how women and man differ and they produce and share market based on this knowledge. Saying that 'Sony's production of rosy laptop for woman is sexist' is stupid.

Please read Aronian's interview, it's a gem, it's funny, emotional and opens new aspect of chess: emotional

Nov-21-08  Open Defence: <Saying that 'Sony's production of rosy laptop for woman is sexist' is stupid. > actually Sony's production of a rosy laptop for women is stupid.
Nov-21-08  Augalv: "Women cannot play chess."

I don't agree Levon.

Nov-21-08  MarkusKann: He said that?, is an idiot.
Nov-22-08  arsen387: a nice article in Russian about Armenian team spirit in Turin's and Dresden's Olimpiads and particularly about Armenia-Russia match in this Olimpiad. http://chesspro.ru/_events/2008/oly...
Nov-24-08  DUS: Bobby Fischer has already been talking negative on women chess.

<keypusher> knows the website...

Nov-26-08  arsen387: Our team, again lead by Levon, won the Olimpiad Gold the second time in a row!! much thanks to Levon. I hope one day he will also win the world's individual champion's title!

just a link with a small article about our fantastic success http://armenianow.com/?action=viewA...

Dec-06-08  Augalv: FIDE must reverse its dedision!

"I must request you to critically view and question the GA's latest decisions," writes Levon Aronian, the world' number seven ranked player, to FIDE President Kirsan Ilyumzhinov. "Why should we go through several tournaments over several years and fight for a place in a tournament that another player gets by losing a match?" The winner of the first Grand Prix event sent us this open letter.

Open letter
Dear Mr. Ilyumzhinov and the FIDE Presidential Board,

In the wake of recent events surrounding the FIDE Grand Prix and the General Assembly's decision to alter the current World Championship cycle, I feel obliged, as a participant and a leading chess player, to express my disappointment. I must request you to critically view and question the GA's latest decisions and the processes to which they came. I must stress that I am not one for scandals and do not wish to cause unnecessary fights – however I believe it is my duty to act as the voice of the players.

Firstly, the decision to alter the World Championship cycle at this time is not in the spirit of fair competition. We can draw a parallel to the following example: the rules set before a race state that the marathon is 42km, and while the runners are still running, having already completed 20km, the rules are suddenly changed to make the marathon an 80km run. The runners thus lose motivation to run and consequently distrust the rule makers. This is comparable to the situation the participants of the FIDE Grand Prix will be in if the GA's decisions are made final.

After severe criticism for many years over the World Championship cycle, FIDE finally created a promising new system, only now to self-impose new waves of criticism. When the initial World Championship cycle was set in place and the Grand Prix system was created for players to qualify legitimately for a chance to challenge the world champion, we had the belief that there was finally a fair and reliable system (which my federation also supported).

With the GA's recent actions, it seems that there is a democratic deficit within FIDE. The GA did not consult the players currently taking part in the Grand Prix in their decision processes. Please keep in mind a very important point – these players, including myself, have a legally binding agreement with FIDE regarding the World Championship cycle and the Grand Prix. Therefore it is FIDE's duty to consult the other party of the contract – the participants.

Does this mean that the chess players have lesser rights than others? The GA appears to act with no concern for the players. The decision to suddenly change the World Championship cycle has damaging effects on the career plans of leading chess players. It is also reasonable to ask: why should we go through several tournaments over several years and fight for a place in a tournament that another player gets by losing a match? The GA's decisions remove the motivation for players like myself to take part in the World Championship cycle.

It should be noted that Mr. Mastrokoukos' reason to change the cycle because of the unforeseen events of two legs of the Grand Prix withdrawing is not convincing and does not reflect reality – because a Grand Prix event in Yerevan has already been announced by FIDE as a replacement. It is clear that the withdrawal of Doha and Montreux are not endangering the system, as he would have us believe in his letter to Mr. Carlsen.

It seems that FIDE was on the right path towards a reliable World Championship cycle, which had the support of leading players and chess federations worldwide. However, with the GA's recent actions, FIDE has left the right path and will lose its credibility in the eyes of chess players world wide – not to mention, ruin its efforts to be recognized as a sport by the IOC. I hope that the above arguments will be heard before finalizing the decisions of the GA.

Sincerely,
Levon Aronian
Frankfurt am Main
December 6, 2008

http://chessbase.com/newsdetail.asp...

Dec-06-08  adair10: Most of the points Aronian makes are right on. But not sure about <It is clear that the withdrawal of Doha and Montreux are not endangering the system...> If it stays 4-tournament event as it seems the status as of now, how one can fairly determine the winner with participants playing not the same number of Drand Prix tournaments?
Dec-06-08  Open Defence: are we on the verge of seeing another split in World Chess ?
Dec-06-08  adair10: <The GA's decisions remove the motivation for players like myself to take part in the World Championship cycle.>

If Aronian withdraws, that would be the end of Grand Prix, because Yerevan leg will unlikely take place without Aronian

Dec-06-08  Ychromosome: 110% behind Aronian. Is there an online petition or anything to side with the participants against FIDE? I am not a FIDE basher but this is just uncalled for.
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