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B Blumenfeld 
Photograph courtesy of proint.narod.ru.  
Benjamin Markovich Blumenfeld
Number of games in database: 17
Years covered: 1903 to 1931
Overall record: +9 -7 =1 (55.9%)*
   * Overall winning percentage = (wins+draws/2) / total games
      Based on games in the database; may be incomplete.

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BENJAMIN MARKOVICH BLUMENFELD
(born May-24-1884, died Mar-05-1947, 62 years old) Lithuania (federation/nationality Russia)

[what is this?]

Benjamin Markovich Blumenfeld was born in Vilkaviškis (Vilkavishkis), a small town in Southern Lithuania, which before 1917 belonged to the Russian Empire. (1) He was introduced to chess at an early age, while learning in a traditional Jewish school ("kheyder"). (2)

In 1901, he participated in the city championship of Libau (today Liepaja, Latvia), and took 1st place. (3)

The next year, at the age of 18, Blumenfeld moved to Germany to study law at the University of Berlin. Here he frequently visited the "Kaiserhof" chess café, and became a strong chess player. As a member of the student chess society, he was admitted to the Berlin championship in 1903. (2) Blumenfeld took 5th place in this strong tournament, which included masters Horatio Caro, Marcus Kann, Ossip Bernstein, and Rudolf Spielmann. (3)

At the end of 1905, Blumenfeld was invited to St. Petersburg to participate in the fourth Russian Championship. In this tournament (December 22th, 1905 - January 16th, 1906) he tied for second/third with Akiba Rubinstein (with 12/16), one point behind Georg Salwe. For this result, he was awarded the master title.

Shortly after this tournament Blumenfeld moved to Moscow, where he completed his law studies in the Moscow University. In this period, he dedicated most of his time to professional activity and rarely played in chess tournaments. (2)

In 1907, he tied for second/third with Georg Marco, behind Mikhail Chigorin, in the Moscow masters tournament.

In 1920, he took eighth place in the Russian Chess Olympiad in Moscow, which was won by Alexander Alekhine. Later this tournament was recognized as the first USSR championship. (USSR Championship (1920)) (4)

At the end of 1921, Blumenfeld moved to Kaunas (Lithuania). It was advertised that he would play a match for the Lithuanian championship title with Antanas Gustaitis, the first Lithuanian champion, but the match was delayed many times and in 1922 Blumenfeld moved back to Russia. (1)

In 1925, he tied for second/third with Boris Verlinsky in the Moscow championship. (5)

In 1930, Blumenfeld took shared 3rd-5th place in the Moscow masters tournament, and in 1934 shared 3rd-5th place in the Moscow championship. During this time period, he also researched and published his works related to the different aspects of the battle of chess. (4)

His most important contribution chess theory is the Blumenfeld Gambit(6) (1.d4 ♘f6 2.c4 e6 3.♘f3 c5 4.d5 b5), an opening that was later adopted by Alexander Alekhine.


click for larger view

In 1945, two years before he passed away, Blumenfeld successfully defended his PhD thesis, an original academic research on psychology, based on cognition in chess. (4)

(1) "Žydai Lietuvos šachmatų istorijoje" ("Jews in Lithuania chess history"), Eugenijus Paleckis, Boris Rositsan, Vilnius, 2015, pages 56-68.
(2) "Shachmati v SSSR on Moscow championship" (special edition of Shachmati v SSSR) 1946, number 2, pages 37-39. Article of B.M.Blumenfeld: "из воспоминаний старого мастера" ("memories of the old master").
(3) "Советская шахматная школа" ("Sovjet chess school"), Kotov, Judovich, Moscow, 1955, pages 97-98.
(4) "Shachmati v SSSR" 1947, number 4, page 97. Article of Peter Romanovsky: "B.M.Blumenfeld - obituary"
(5) Wikipedia article: Чемпионат Москвы по шахматам 1925
(6) Wikipedia article: Blumenfeld Gambit

Wikipedia article: Benjamin Blumenfeld

Last updated: 2016-09-28 01:49:10

 page 1 of 1; 17 games  PGN Download 
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. B Blumenfeld vs NN 1-010 1903 MoscowC45 Scotch Game
2. B Blumenfeld vs Nimzowitsch 1-029 1903 BerlinC45 Scotch Game
3. B Blumenfeld vs Znosko-Borovsky  ½-½33 1905 St Petersburg itC10 French
4. B Blumenfeld vs P A Evtifeev 1-035 1905 St PetersburgB06 Robatsch
5. Dus Chotimirsky vs B Blumenfeld  0-146 1905 St PetersburgD45 Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav
6. Salwe vs B Blumenfeld  0-157 1905 St PetersburgC12 French, McCutcheon
7. B Blumenfeld vs S Izbinsky 1-063 1905 St PetersburgB18 Caro-Kann, Classical
8. B Blumenfeld vs G Helbach 1-015 1906 St PetersburgC45 Scotch Game
9. Rubinstein vs B Blumenfeld 1-022 1906 St.Petersburg-chD04 Queen's Pawn Game
10. S Levitsky vs B Blumenfeld 1-065 1906 4th All Russian TournamentC11 French
11. B Blumenfeld vs Alekhine 0-133 1908 Moscow m (02)C41 Philidor Defense
12. Alekhine vs B Blumenfeld 1-048 1908 Moscow MatchD02 Queen's Pawn Game
13. N Pavlov-Pianov vs B Blumenfeld 0-131 1920 USSR ChampionshipA47 Queen's Indian
14. B Blumenfeld vs A Rabinovich 1-032 1924 Ch MoscowD49 Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav, Meran
15. B Blumenfeld vs Kasparian  0-155 1931 Ch URS (1/2 final)B12 Caro-Kann Defense
16. A Khodzhaev vs B Blumenfeld  1-047 1931 Ch URS (1/2 final)D02 Queen's Pawn Game
17. B Blumenfeld vs Botvinnik 0-123 1931 USSRB20 Sicilian
 page 1 of 1; 17 games  PGN Download 
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2) | Blumenfeld wins | Blumenfeld loses  
 

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
May-24-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  brankat: R.I.P. Mr.Blumenfeld.
Oct-03-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  wordfunph: entertaining anecdote by D. Bjelica from his book Grandmaster in Profile..

<GM Lev Polugaevsky told us a story to Dimitri Bjelica from a Moscow tournament when master Blumenfeld's opponent persistently looked at his rival's notebook. Blemenfeld was annoyed by this and so he wrote, "I am rather worried about the sacrifice of the queen of f7". Afterwards he went off for a walk. When he returned he saw that his opponent had played exactly that move. Blumenfeld sat at the board and calmly wrote in the book: "As I suspected the sacrifice was incorrect.">

rest in peace, master Blumenfeld..

Aug-25-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  hemy: Wrong picture of B.M.Blumenfeld on CG and Wikipedia. It is a picture of Isadore Blumenfeld: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/34839...

Here is the picture of B.M.Blumenfeld:
http://www.proint.narod.ru/publ2016...

Aug-26-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  hemy: Profile picture for B.M.Blumenfeld is a mistake, it belongs to the "Jewish Al Capone" Isadore Blumenfeld (aka Kid Cann), the most notorious mobster in the history of Minnesota. http://www.citypages.com/news/the-f...
Aug-26-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  hemy: German language page of Wikipedia displaying the right picture of B.M.Blumenfeld: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benja...
Sep-01-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Annie K.: Thanks, <hemy>. :)
Sep-01-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  hemy: <Annie K.>I'm glad the picture of mobster removed and replaced by right picture of chess master.

Wikipedia English language page of Benjamin Blumenfeld have wrong place of his birth:"Volkovysk, today Vawkavysk, Belarus". According to Russian language page his birthday place was Lithuanian town Vilkaviškis which before 1917 was belonging to Russian Empire. Sure the translation from Russian to English vent wrong.

On the page 58 of the book "Žydai Lietuvos šachmatų istorijoje" you will found picture of Benjaminas Blumenfeldas passport issued in Kaunas, December 1921. The birthday place ("gimimo vieta") - Vilkaviškis.

Unfortunately the picture on the page 56 is the same wrong picture that was replaced on CG. In the next edition of the book it will be replaced by the right picture taken from proint.narod.ru website.

At end of 1921 after Blumenfeld returned to Kaunas it was advertised that he will play match for Lithuania championship title with Antanas Gustaitis - first Lithuanian champion, but the match was delayed many times and in 1922 he moved to Russia.

Sep-01-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Annie K.: <hemy> you know so many wonderful anecdotes and interesting facts about otherwise little-known players... would you like to join our editor group and help write biographies for them? :)
Sep-01-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  hemy: <Annie K.>I can not commit too much time for this task. Beside this English isn't my best language, I learned it at age of 50.

At school I learned German and Lithuanian, but my best languages are Russian and Hebrew. I can share my knowledge and write short biographies of some players, but someone will have to edit them.

Sep-01-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Annie K.: <hemy> that's very good too! If you would like to have anything you write edited, you can either post it to the Biographer Bistro, or post it to the relevant player page, and just notify us about it at the Bistro, so we don't miss it.

You can also speak in Hebrew with me, if it helps. :)

Sep-01-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  hemy: <Annie K.> OK. I will try to do my best.
Sep-02-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Annie K.: Great! There's no hurry, just do whatever you feel like. :)
Sep-02-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  hemy: Benjamin Markovich Blumenfeld (born May-24-1884, died Mar-05-1947, 62 years old) Lithuania, Russia. Benjamin Markovich Blumenfeld was born in Vilkaviškis (Vilkavishkis), small town in Southern Lithuania which before 1917 was belonging to Russian Empire. He was introduced to chess in early age while learning in traditional Jewish school "kheyder". In 1901 he took part in a local tournament in Libau (today Liepaja, Latvia) The next year at age of 18 Blumenfeld went to Germany to study law at the university of Berlin. Here he frequently visited chess café "Kaiserhof" and became strong chess player. As a member of the student chess society he was admitted to the Berlin championship in 1903. Blumenfeld took 5th place in this strong tournament, which included masters Karo, Kon, Bernstein and Spielman. At the end of 1905 Blumenfeld was invited to St. Petersburg to participate in the fourth Russian championship. In this tournament (December 22th 1905 - January 16th 1906) he tied for second/third with Akiba Rubinstein (12 from16), one point behind Gersz Salwe. For this result he was awarded master title. Shortly after this tournament Blumenfeld moved to Moscow where he completed law study in Moscow University. At this time period Blumenfeld dedicated most of his time to professional activity and rarely played in chess tournaments. In 1907 he tied for second/third with Georg Marco, behind Mikhail Chigorin, in Moscow masters tournament. In 1920 he took eighth in Moscow (Russian Chess Olympiad). This event was won by Alexander Alekhine. Later this tournament was recognized as a 1st URS championship. At end of 1921 Blumenfeld moved to Kaunas (Lithuania). It was advertised that he will play match for Lithuania championship title with Antanas Gustaitis - first Lithuanian champion, but the match was delayed many times and in 1922 he moved back to Russia. In 1925 he tied for second/third with Boris Verlinsky, in the Moscow championship. In 1930 Blumenfeld took 3-5 place in Moscow masters tournament and in 1934 3-5 place in Moscow championship. At this time period Blumenfeld also researched and published his works related to different aspects of chess battle. The most important contribution of Blumenfeld to theory of chess was Blumenfeld gambit, opening that was later adopted by Alexander Alekhine. In 1945, 2 years before he passed away Blumenfeld successfully defended his phd thesis, an original academic research on psychology, based on chess intellection.
Sep-03-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Annie K.: <hemy> a couple of questions, please? :)

<In 1925 he tied for second/third with Boris Verlinsky, in the Moscow championship.>

I am looking at USSR Championship (1925) and Moscow (1925), but I don't see Blumenfeld in either of them, nor Verlinsky on second place?

<based on chess intellection>

It's unclear what "intellection" means. Could you use a different word, or explain in Hebrew?

Also, please check if all the links in the bio are going to the right players / events, and let me know where I should place the reference numbers in the text for your sources 1-4. :)

Sep-03-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  hemy: <Annie K.><but I don't see Blumenfeld in either of them, nor Verlinsky on second place> https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/j... Moscow championship 1925:
1.Sergeev Alexandr (13 from 17)
2-3 Blumenfeld Beniamin, Verlinsky Boris (12 from 17). January 11 - February 25, 1925.
References in this article are to magazine "64 shachmati i shashki v rabochem klube" 1925 numbers 1,2,3,4 and "Chess encyclopedia" Karpov, 1990, page 552, page 624.

On other subjects I will respond later.

Sep-03-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  hemy: <Annie K.><It's unclear what "intellection" means. Could you use a different word, or explain in Hebrew?>

I tried to explain his phd thesis subject using notion "intellection". The definition "Intellection" could be found on http://www.dictionary.com/browse/in...

1. the action or process of understanding; the exercise of the intellect; reasoning.

2. a particular act of the intellect.

3. a conception or idea as the result of such an act; notion; thought.

In Russian language it was
"Проблемы психологии наглядно действенного мышления на базе шахматного материала". "Problems of psychology of visually effective thinking on the basis of chess material".

Sep-03-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Annie K.: Oh, ok, I think we can use "cognition" then. It means about same thing, but is a better-known term. :)

About the sources, I copied the ones you gave at the Bistro, I could add the ones you name here too, but I am asking where in the text of the article you would like to put the numbers that are referenced in the footnotes? For example, look at footnote number 5, the Blumenfeld Gambit; there is a (5) in the text itself that references this footnote. It's not really essential, but would clarify which source gives what information in the article. :)

Sep-03-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  hemy: <Annie K.>I understood this. I will work on this tomorrow. Today me and my wife are going to "Ashkenaz festival". http://www.harbourfrontcentre.com/f...
Sep-03-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Annie K.: No hurry. :). Have fun!!
Sep-04-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  hemy: <Annie K.> Benjamin Markovich Blumenfeld was born in Vilkaviškis (Vilkavishkis), a small town in Southern Lithuania, which before 1917 belonged to the Russian Empire. (3)

He was introduced to chess at an early age, while learning in a traditional Jewish school ("kheyder"). (1)

In 1901, he took part in a local tournament in Libau (today Liepaja, Latvia) and took 1st place (4).

The next year, at the age of 18, Blumenfeld moved to Germany to study law at the University of Berlin. Here he frequently visited the "Kaiserhof" chess café, and became a strong chess player. As a member of the student chess society, he was admitted to the Berlin championship in 1903.(1)

Blumenfeld took 5th place in this strong tournament, which included masters Horatio Caro, Marcus Kann, Ossip Bernstein, and Rudolf Spielmann. At the end of 1905, Blumenfeld was invited to St. Petersburg to participate in the fourth Russian Championship. In this tournament (December 22th, 1905 - January 16th, 1906) he tied for second/third with Akiba Rubinstein (with 12/16), one point behind Georg Salwe. For this result, he was awarded the master title. Shortly after this tournament Blumenfeld moved to Moscow, where he completed his law studies in the Moscow University. In this period, he dedicated most of his time to professional activity and rarely played in chess tournaments. (1)

In 1907 he tied for second/third with Georg Marco, behind Mikhail Chigorin, in the Moscow masters tournament. (Wikipedia article: Benjamin Blumenfeld) In 1920, he took eighth place in the Russian Chess Olympiad in Moscow, which was won by Alexander Alekhine. Later this tournament was recognized as the first USSR championship. (USSR Championship (1920)) (2)

At the end of 1921, Blumenfeld moved to Kaunas (Lithuania). It was advertised that he would play a match for the Lithuanian championship title with Antanas Gustaitis, the first Lithuanian champion, but the match was delayed many times and in 1922 Blumenfeld moved back to Russia. (3)

In 1925 he tied for second/third with Boris Verlinsky, in the Moscow championship. (Wikipedia article: Benjamin Blumenfeld) In 1930, Blumenfeld took shared 3rd-5th place in the Moscow masters tournament, and in 1934 shared 3rd-5th place in the Moscow championship. During this time period, he also researched and published his works related to the different aspects of the battle of chess.(2)

His most important contribution chess theory was the Blumenfeld Gambit(5) (1.d4 ♘f6 2.c4 e6 3.♘f3 c5 4.d5 b5), an opening that was later adopted by Alexander Alekhine. In 1945, two years before he passed away, Blumenfeld successfully defended his PhD thesis, an original academic research on psychology, based on cognition in chess.(2)

About the references:
1. "Shachmati v SSSR on Moscow championship" (special edition of Shachmati v SSSR) 1946, number 2, pages 37-39. Article of B.M.Blumenfeld: "из воспоминаний старого мастера" ("memories of the old master")

2. "Shachmati v SSSR" 1947, number 4, page 97.
Article of Peter Romanovsky: "B.M.Blumenfeld - obituary"

3. "Žydai Lietuvos šachmatų istorijoje" ("Jews in Lithuania chess history"), Eugenijus Paleckis, Boris Rositsan, Vilnius, 2015, pages 56-68. The chapter related to B.M.Blumenfeld includes translated to Lithuanian language full text of the articles (1) and (2) and information taken from articles published in Lithuanian sources at different time periods. It also includes documents from Lithuanian National archives as well.

4. "Советская шахматная школа" ("Sovjet chess school"), Kotov, Judovich, Moscow, 1955, pages 97-98. Includes results of Libau and Berlin tournaments. It mention that Libau tournament was the city championship and Blumenfeld took 1st place.

Sep-04-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  hemy: <Annie K.> I have files of magazines "Shachmati v SSSR on Moscow championship" 1946-2 and "Shachmati v SSSR" 1947-4. Also I have a pdf file of "СЛОВАРЬ ШАХМАТИСТА" (Dictionery of chess player), M.S.Kogan, L.I. Kubbel, G.Y.Levenfish, Y.G.Rochlin, V.I.Sozin, 1929. On the page 50 you will found article about Blumenfeld, from where probably was taken the info in "Советская шахматная школа" ("Sovjet chess school"), Kotov, Judovich. I can send it to you by email, if it is interesting for you.
Sep-04-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Annie K.: <hemy> thanks, but I'm not that much of a historian myself. I mainly just love chess, and this community; I like helping this site improve in every way I can, and helping the good people who also enjoy contributing to it. :)

Brilliant work on the sources, this is going to be a first class biography! I'll get to work on it now - I want to renumber the sources so they appear in 1-4 order at their first mentions.

Sep-04-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Annie K.: Ok, done - please check I didn't mix up the sources during renumbering?

I decided the 1925 tournament crosstable page was a better reference to (5) than the general Wiki article, which doesn't really need to be numbered - it's just provided as a courtesy for most players. :)

Sep-04-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  hemy: <Annie K.>Perfect.
Sep-05-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Annie K.: Great, thanks! :)
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