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Yuri Averbakh
Number of games in database: 716
Years covered: 1939 to 2007
Last FIDE rating: 2445
Overall record: +200 -121 =391 (55.5%)*
   * Overall winning percentage = (wins+draws/2) / total games
      Based on games in the database; may be incomplete.
      4 exhibition games, odds games, etc. are excluded from this statistic.

MOST PLAYED OPENINGS
With the White pieces:
 King's Indian (52) 
    E73 E68 E75 E60 E74
 Sicilian (43) 
    B90 B92 B62 B48 B93
 Ruy Lopez (28) 
    C92 C97 C83 C75 C61
 Nimzo Indian (21) 
    E59 E32 E54 E26 E50
 Queen's Gambit Declined (19) 
    D38 D35 D30 D37 D31
 English, 1 c4 e5 (17) 
    A29 A25 A21 A22 A20
With the Black pieces:
 Sicilian (67) 
    B60 B57 B39 B88 B77
 Nimzo Indian (63) 
    E58 E46 E53 E34 E59
 Ruy Lopez (57) 
    C98 C92 C95 C96 C87
 Ruy Lopez, Closed (46) 
    C98 C92 C95 C96 C87
 Sicilian Richter-Rauser (21) 
    B60 B65 B63 B67 B62
 Sicilian Dragon (19) 
    B39 B77 B76 B73 B36
Repertoire Explorer

NOTABLE GAMES: [what is this?]
   Geller vs Averbakh, 1954 0-1
   Averbakh vs Spassky, 1956 1/2-1/2
   Averbakh vs Bondarevsky, 1948 1/2-1/2
   Averbakh vs Taimanov, 1953 1-0
   Korchnoi vs Averbakh, 1959 0-1
   Najdorf vs Averbakh, 1953 0-1
   Averbakh vs Fischer, 1958 1/2-1/2
   Averbakh vs Sarvarov, 1959 1-0
   Polugaevsky vs Averbakh, 1961 1/2-1/2
   Averbakh vs V Zak, 1947 1-0

NOTABLE TOURNAMENTS: [what is this?]
   USSR Championship (1950)
   USSR Championship (1951)
   Stockholm Interzonal (1952)
   Zurich Candidates (1953)
   USSR Championship (1956)
   Portoroz Interzonal (1958)
   USSR Championship (1958)
   Hastings 1959/60 (1959)
   USSR Championship (1959)
   USSR Championship 1961b (1961)
   USSR Championship (1970)
   Palma de Mallorca (1972)

GAME COLLECTIONS: [what is this?]
   Averbakh's Selected Games, 1943-1975 by Resignation Trap
   USSR Championship 1956 by Phony Benoni

Search Sacrifice Explorer for Yuri Averbakh
Search Google for Yuri Averbakh
FIDE player card for Yuri Averbakh


YURI AVERBAKH
(born Feb-08-1922) Russia
PRONUNCIATION:
[what is this?]
Yuri Lvovich Averbakh was born in Kaluga, Russia. He was awarded the IM title in 1950, the GM title in 1952 and played in the Zurich Candidates (1953).

Notable tournament results: He won the USSR Championship in 1954 (1) ahead of Mark Taimanov, Viktor Korchnoi, Tigran Vartanovich Petrosian, Efim Geller and Salomon Flohr; he was also equal first in the Soviet Championship of 1956, but lost in the playoff for first place. He won the Championship of Moscow in 1949 (2), 1950 (3) (jointly), and 1962 (jointly). He also won international tournaments in Vienna in 1961, Moscow in 1962 and Rio de Janeiro in 1965 (4).

Theoretician, author and historian: Averbakh is renowned as an opening and endgame theorist. In the late 1950s and early 1960s, he co-edited a five-volume anthology on the endgame, Shakhmatnye okonchaniya, which was revised in 1980-84 and translated as Comprehensive Chess Endings. A list of his books can be found in the Wikipedia article about him (see footnotes below). He also edited the magazines Shakhmaty v SSSR and Shakhmatny Bulletin, and has published more than 100 endgame studies and written several books, mainly about endgame theory. He has a deep interest in chess history, shown in his most recent book about life in the chess world called Centre-Stage and Behind the Scenes. He also gave an in depth interview about the history of chess and other board games on his 90th birthday. (5)

Eponymous opening variations: Opening variations named for Averbakh include:

King's Indian Defence, Averbakh Variation (E73): 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.Be2 0-0 6.Bg5:


click for larger view

Kings Indian Defence, Semi-Averbakh system (E73): 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.Be2 0-0 6.Be3


click for larger view

Modern Defense: Averbakh variation (A42): 1.d4 g6 2.c4 Bg7 3.Nc3 d6 4.e4


click for larger view

Other: Averbakh became an International Judge of Chess Composition in 1956 and an International Arbiter in 1969. He was President of the Soviet Chess Federation from 1972 until 1977 and took an active role on a number of important FIDE committees.

Aged 92, Averbakh is currently the world's oldest living grandmaster.

Sources and references: Wikipedia article: Yuri Averbakh; 1[rusbase-1]; (2) [rusbase-2]; (3) [rusbase-3]; (4) [brasilbase-1]; (5) http://www.chessintranslation.com/2...


 page 1 of 29; games 1-25 of 716  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. Averbakh vs Smyslov 0-124 1939 MoscowA06 Reti Opening
2. Averbakh vs Botvinnik ½-½40 1944 RussiaC07 French, Tarrasch
3. Averbakh vs Ragozin  ½-½43 1944 Ch URS (1/2 final)A10 English
4. Averbakh vs Lilienthal 1-063 1944 RUSC92 Ruy Lopez, Closed
5. Averbakh vs Kotov 0-130 1944 1/2 finalB51 Sicilian, Canal-Sokolsky (Rossolimo) Attack
6. Averbakh vs Flohr  ½-½18 1944 Ch URS (1/2 final)C82 Ruy Lopez, Open
7. Averbakh vs Simagin  ½-½29 1946 Ch MoscowB16 Caro-Kann, Bronstein-Larsen Variation
8. Bronstein vs Averbakh 1-041 1946 Ch MoscowB71 Sicilian, Dragon, Levenfish Variation
9. Lilienthal vs Averbakh ½-½28 1946 RUSE53 Nimzo-Indian, 4.e3
10. Averbakh vs Kotov ½-½69 1946 RUSB63 Sicilian, Richter-Rauzer Attack
11. Averbakh vs Bondarevsky 1-058 1946 Moscow-chA34 English, Symmetrical
12. Smyslov vs Averbakh 1-068 1946 MoscowE53 Nimzo-Indian, 4.e3
13. Petrosian vs Averbakh 0-140 1947 Ch URS ( 1/2 )C89 Ruy Lopez, Marshall
14. Averbakh vs V Zak 1-026 1947 Match for Masters TitleC83 Ruy Lopez, Open
15. Averbakh vs Kholmov 1-026 1947 URS-ch sfA15 English
16. Averbakh vs Lisitsin 0-139 1948 USSR ChampionshipB71 Sicilian, Dragon, Levenfish Variation
17. Keres vs Averbakh  ½-½42 1948 USSR ChampionshipD30 Queen's Gambit Declined
18. Averbakh vs Taimanov  1-065 1948 USSR ChampionshipE29 Nimzo-Indian, Samisch
19. Averbakh vs Levenfish  ½-½23 1948 USSR ChampionshipD14 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav, Exchange Variation
20. Averbakh vs Kholmov 1-069 1948 USSR ChampionshipB19 Caro-Kann, Classical
21. Furman vs Averbakh 1-036 1948 USSR ChampionshipE37 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
22. Bronstein vs Averbakh 1-044 1948 USSR ChampionshipA15 English
23. Aronin vs Averbakh  ½-½41 1948 USSR ChampionshipC92 Ruy Lopez, Closed
24. Lilienthal vs Averbakh  1-044 1948 USSR ChampionshipD38 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation
25. Kotov vs Averbakh 0-147 1948 USSR ChampionshipD41 Queen's Gambit Declined, Semi-Tarrasch
 page 1 of 29; games 1-25 of 716  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2) | Averbakh wins | Averbakh loses  

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 5 OF 5 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Feb-16-12  bronkenstein: Speaking of Svidler´s memorable quotes:

´My games with Kramnik were like waiting on a buss ... nothing for a long time and then 2 victories in a row´

Peter during one of his Tal Memo 2011 post -mortems =)

Feb-17-12  cornwallman: Happy Birthday Yuri Averbakh, 90 years old today , and now the worlds oldest living Grandmaster.
Feb-17-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Harvestman: World's oldest living GM, and no pic?
Feb-19-12  Penguincw: Quote of the Day

< "I have seen two geniuses in my time. One was Tal. The other was Fischer." >

--- Averbakh

Feb-19-12  jackpawn: < "I have seen two geniuses in my time. One was Tal. The other was Fischer." >

--- Averbakh
It's interesting that he didn't consider Karpov or Kasparov to be geniuses.

Feb-19-12  Blunderdome: Well, it doesn't say what year the quote is from.
Feb-19-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  pawn to QB4: http://www.chesscircle.net/forums/s... - 1990 apparently. He does give Kasparov a "maybe". Of course, he's old enough to consider Capablanca, Alekhine and Botvinnik to be "in my time" if he wishes.
Feb-19-12  polarmis: Here's a new interview with Averbakh on his 90th birthday:

http://www.chessintranslation.com/2...

Feb-20-12  bronkenstein: Finally an interview with Yourri without all those conspiracies on and on, the choice of questions is very refreshing , even unexpected - nice for a change.

TY again (...and again ...=) <polarmis>.

Mar-09-12  laurenttizano: I don't have time to finger those books authored by old man Averbakh,But I have doubts if Gm Mark Taimanov . Good luck
Family of Grandmasters!!!!!
God Bless us AALLLL!
Thanks for the space provided!
Love yah guys!
Amen!!!!!!!!!!1
May-20-12  bengalcat47: I have Averbakh's book Queen and Pawn Endings. This book is well written, and is an excellent treatment of playing a very difficult endgame.
Feb-21-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  alexmagnus: Bio: <Yuri Lvovich Averbakh was born in Kaluga, Russia (formerly USSR).>

Actually, the "formerly USSR" can here be left out, as the Soviet Union was founded some months later (on December 30th 1922).

Aug-24-13  csmath: Tons of Averbakh's games are missing in this database. Some of the topical theoretical games important for opening theory among them.
Nov-15-13  Mudphudder: Is he still the oldest living GM?
Nov-15-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Shams: <Mudphudder> Yup. Until nonagenarians start earning norms, that's a title you keep until you die.
Dec-01-13  Swedish Logician: I greatly admire Averbakh's book "Schachtaktik für Fortgeschrittene", Sportverlag, Berlin, 2nd edition 1983 (Eng. tr: "Chess Tactics for Advanced Players" 1984, but the German version is better.). His analysis of "contacts" (Ger. Bindungen) and the analysis of the genesis of combinations is truly impressive. It is a first-rate intellectual achievement that provides a conceptual apparatus leading to a genuine THEORY of the combinatorial middle game phase in chess.
However, in spite of ardent search I have not come across any other writers that make use of Averbakh's pioneering work. Can anyone help me out here?
Dec-27-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Benzol: I don't understand this part of his bio <he co-edited a four-volume anthology on the endgame, Shakhmatnye okonchaniya, which was revised in 1980-84 and translated as a four or five volume work titled Comprehensive Chess Endings (the existence of a fifth volume is in doubt).>. The Wikipedia article in the notes lists 5 volumes in the Comprehensive Chess Endings series where the ISBN numbers are also given. Averbakhs' book of his own selected games published in 1998 also says it's a 5 volume series. So did the fifth volume fail to appear or what?
Dec-27-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: <Benzol> Well, the Library of Congress and Amazon.com both agree it exists. Can there be any doubt?

http://www.amazon.com/Comprehensive...

Not that I'm going to buy a new copy anytime soon.

To quell any doubt, here is the catalog record from the Cleveland Public Library, clearly specifying 5 volumes.

http://cpl.bibliocommons.com/item/s...

If we can't believe the Cleveland Public Library, then I give up.

Dec-28-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Benzol: <PB> Thanks for the confirmation. Wonder where the person who did the bio got the idea that the fifth volume was bogus?
Dec-29-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Benzol: Found out that a number of Averbakh's books are available at Fishpond including the Comprehensive Chess Endings series.

See http://www.fishpond.co.nz/c/Books/q...

Mar-02-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  twinlark: Belated happy birthday to the world's oldest living GM.
Apr-11-14  nummerzwei: < Benzol: <PB> Thanks for the confirmation. Wonder where the person who did the bio got the idea that the fifth volume was bogus?

Dec-27-13
Premium Chessgames Member Phony Benoni: <Benzol> Well, the Library of Congress and Amazon.com both agree it exists. Can there be any doubt? http://www.amazon.com/Comprehensive...

Not that I'm going to buy a new copy anytime soon.

To quell any doubt, here is the catalog record from the Cleveland Public Library, clearly specifying 5 volumes.

http://cpl.bibliocommons.com/item/s...

If we can't believe the Cleveland Public Library, then I give up.

Dec-27-13
Premium Chessgames Member Benzol: I don't understand this part of his bio <he co-edited a four-volume anthology on the endgame, Shakhmatnye okonchaniya, which was revised in 1980-84 and translated as a four or five volume work titled Comprehensive Chess Endings (the existence of a fifth volume is in doubt).>. The Wikipedia article in the notes lists 5 volumes in the Comprehensive Chess Endings series where the ISBN numbers are also given. Averbakhs' book of his own selected games published in 1998 also says it's a 5 volume series. So did the fifth volume fail to appear or what?>

The book on rook endgames was split in two volumes for publication in English, hence the difference.

Apr-11-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Benzol: <nummerzwei> Thankyou for the information update.

:)

Apr-12-14  nummerzwei: < Benzol: <nummerzwei> Thankyou for the information update. >

Unfortunately, I just found out that what I've written wasn't entirely accurate, to put it mildly.

Actually, both the original Russian and English edition come in five volumes, the existence of which is not in doubt.

It was for publication in German that the volume on rook endings was split, making this a series of six books.

Anyway, to make up for the confusion caused, these are the Averbakh books as referenced in 'Fundamental Chess Endings':

Volume 1: bishop endings, knight endings (with Chekhover)

Volume 2: bishop against knight, rook against minor piece

Volume 3: queen endings, queen against rook (V.Khenkin), queen against minor piece (with Chekhover)

Volume 4: pawn endings (with Maizelis)

Volume 5: rook endings (with Kopaev)

May-29-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  GrahamClayton: Here is an interesting quote about Averbakh trying to enlist in the Red Army after the German invasion of the USSR in June 1941:

"Yuri Averbakh, who in the fullness of time became one of the Soviet Union's most distinguished grandmasters of chess, missed volunteering by a series of fortunate accidents which probably saved his life. A precocious child, he entered the Bauman Higher Technical Institute in 1939 at the young age of seventeen. He was therefore in the midst of his studies and exempt from immediate call-up when the war began. Instead of joining a volunteer division he was sent to work at a tank repair base outside Moscow. When the Germans broke the Russian front outside Moscow in mid-October, Shcherbakov issued a panic call for volunteers for a new wave of militia units. There was no avoiding the call this time. Averbakh turned up in the most suitable civilian clothes he had. The recruiting sergeant took one look at his light summer boots and told him to buy something more suitable. He went round all the shops, but no one had anything to fit his unusually large feet. So once again he missed the war."

"Moscow 1941", Rodric Braithwaite, Profile Books, London 2007, p. 104.

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