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S Matveeva 
 
Svetlana Matveeva
Number of games in database: 291
Years covered: 1973 to 2012
Last FIDE rating: 2380 (2358 rapid, 2369 blitz)
Highest rating achieved in database: 2454
Overall record: +91 -80 =115 (51.9%)*
   * Overall winning percentage = (wins+draws/2) / total games
      Based on games in the database; may be incomplete.
      5 exhibition games, odds games, etc. are excluded from this statistic.

MOST PLAYED OPENINGS
With the White pieces:
 Nimzo Indian (50) 
    E32 E38 E39 E36 E35
 King's Indian (15) 
    E92 E63 E60 E90 E61
 Semi-Slav (14) 
    D45 D43 D44
 Queen's Gambit Declined (14) 
    D31 D30 D37 D35
 Slav (14) 
    D10 D15 D17 D16 D18
 Modern Benoni (8) 
    A57 A56 A65 A64
With the Black pieces:
 French Defense (58) 
    C03 C11 C18 C01 C02
 Queen's Gambit Accepted (19) 
    D27 D20 D21
 French Tarrasch (18) 
    C03 C05
 French (17) 
    C11 C00 C13
 French Winawer (14) 
    C18 C16 C19 C17 C15
 Queen's Pawn Game (9) 
    D02 A40 D00 A45
Repertoire Explorer

NOTABLE GAMES: [what is this?]
   S Matveeva vs Y Xu, 2008 1-0
   S Matveeva vs A Stefanova, 1994 1-0
   Kosteniuk vs S Matveeva, 2010 0-1
   M Sebag vs S Matveeva, 2006 0-1

NOTABLE TOURNAMENTS: [what is this?]
   EU-ch 4th, Women (2003)
   6th European Individual Women's Championship (2005)
   European Club Cup (Women) (2006)
   Russian Superfinals (Women) (2007)
   European Individual Championship (Women) (2008)
   10th European Individual Women's Championship (2009)
   60th Russian Women's Superfinal (2010)
   European Individual Championships (Women) (2010)

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FIDE player card for Svetlana Matveeva


SVETLANA MATVEEVA
(born Jul-04-1969) Russia
PRONUNCIATION:
[what is this?]
IM and WGM Matveeva won the Junior European Championship (U20 Girls) in 1989 and was Women’s Champion of the USSR in 1991. She came third in the Women’s World Cup in 2002 and was a member of the Russian Olympic team in 1996 (bronze medal), 1998 (silver medal), 2000 (bronze medal) and 2002 (silver medal). She won the first ACP Women’s Internet tournament that was held in May 2004.

Matveeva contested the FIDE Women's World Championship (2006), defeating Marie Sebag to reach the semi finals, before losing to Yuhua Xu. She also contested the FIDE Knock-Out Women's World Championship (2012), but lost in the first round tiebreaker to Natalia Pogonina.

Wikipedia article: Svetlana Matveeva


 page 1 of 12; games 1-25 of 291  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. M Litinskaya-Shul vs S Matveeva  0-130 1973 URS-ch (Women)A04 Reti Opening
2. N Gaprindashvili vs S Matveeva ½-½30 1974 Ch URSB33 Sicilian
3. S Matveeva vs M Litinskaya-Shul  1-042 1987 URS-ch (Women)A04 Reti Opening
4. S Matveeva vs G Timoshchenko  ½-½60 1987 FrunzeD37 Queen's Gambit Declined
5. M Litinskaya-Shul vs S Matveeva  1-034 1987 Belgrade (Women)E90 King's Indian
6. S Matveeva vs G Strutinskaya 0-121 1987 TbilisiA40 Queen's Pawn Game
7. S Matveeva vs N Bojkovic  1-036 1987 BelgradeA80 Dutch
8. S Matveeva vs Anand 0-144 1987 FrunzeB13 Caro-Kann, Exchange
9. Yurtaev vs S Matveeva 1-030 1987 It (cat.8)C16 French, Winawer
10. I Chelushkina vs S Matveeva  1-038 1990 URS-ch (Women)A00 Uncommon Opening
11. Blatny vs S Matveeva  1-050 1990 OakhamC02 French, Advance
12. Sherzer vs S Matveeva  0-140 1990 Prestwich (England)C05 French, Tarrasch
13. S Matveeva vs Anand  0-132 1990 PrestwichA07 King's Indian Attack
14. S Matveeva vs R Popivoda  1-039 1990 Moscow (Women)D31 Queen's Gambit Declined
15. D Norwood vs S Matveeva  1-035 1990 PrestwichA45 Queen's Pawn Game
16. A Galliamova vs S Matveeva  ½-½42 1991 Subotica E67 King's Indian, Fianchetto
17. S Matveeva vs A Galliamova  1-057 1991 Lvov E44 Nimzo-Indian, Fischer Variation, 5.Ne2
18. F Braga vs S Matveeva  0-134 1991 10s, AND op E76 King's Indian, Four Pawns Attack
19. S Matveeva vs J Ye  0-160 1992 Helsinki opE92 King's Indian
20. Gulko vs S Matveeva  1-036 1992 Helsinki opA00 Uncommon Opening
21. S Matveeva vs Chiburdanidze  ½-½35 1992 Manila ol (Women)E92 King's Indian
22. N Gaprindashvili vs S Matveeva 0-136 1992 Belgrade (Yugoslavia)E73 King's Indian
23. S Matveeva vs Chiburdanidze  ½-½41 1992 BelgradeA42 Modern Defense, Averbakh System
24. S Matveeva vs Krasenkow  0-172 1993 swissA56 Benoni Defense
25. S Matveeva vs G Schwartzman  ½-½25 1993 Groningen Chess Festival; GM openD18 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav, Dutch
 page 1 of 12; games 1-25 of 291  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2) | Matveeva wins | Matveeva loses  
 

Kibitzer's Corner
Oct-03-04  Zaius: "Lose with grace and resign in a timely manner. If you are a lot of material down and don't have sufficient compensation, it is time to lay down your arms. This way you show your respect for both chess and your opponent."

How is playing a game through showing any less respect? I think when you resign, whether it be when you have reached your own limit at which you think you cannot come back, or whether it be at a checkmate is dependent entirely on your style and attitude and not on some overarching rule of what is gracious and what is not.

Oct-03-04  HailM0rphy: <you cannot come back> Exactly. You've lost..plain and simple..I don't know if you'd wanna play a game if you knew you'd loose everytime..It's like fighting a war of 500 against 50000..your there, but all your doing using up my time, yours, and the guy who wants to play next..
Oct-03-04  Zaius: Who said anything about losing everytime? I'm talking about a specific game here. If I value my time being spent on a game that is theoretically lost (but that I might come back from and draw through an opponent blunder, however unlikely) as being superior to some sense of temporal efficiency for either you or I, then why shouldn't I go ahead and play it?
Oct-03-04  unclewalter: wars have been won 500 to 50000 (e.g. gideon)...and i respect chess because i've lost "won games" and won lost games...it takes, and i think should take, skill, not just respect, to finish someone off. so zaius, i agree that this quote is silly.
Oct-03-04  Mulfish: Well, I'd guess she's talking about somewhat higher level chess here, too. At the GM level two or three pawns or a piece vs pawn, absent compensation, is sufficient to warrant resignation. At the amateur level anything can happen, so you play on a little longer. In quick chess, never resign. I've won and lost rook-deficit positions often.
Oct-06-04  HailM0rphy: Your right Mul, my bad. Anybody that would be against resignation is still a patzer whos been taught never to resign which I agree with and did too when I was at her level. She'll learn on her own sooner or later like all did..if she even advances to another level at all ;)
Mar-13-06  EmperorAtahualpa: A charming lady! Here's a picture of her taken during the Women's World Chess Championships: http://www.womenchess.com/images/ga...
Mar-15-06  BIDMONFA: Svetlana Matveeva

MATVEEVA, Svetlana
http://www.bidmonfa.com/matveeva_sv...
_

Mar-20-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  twinlark: <chessgames> According to the FIDE ratings history on Matveeva's card, her peak rating was 2502. Link is http://www.fide.com/ratings/id.phtm...
Mar-15-07  stanleys: Well Matveeva was very talented,but I don't think she was capable to draw against Gaprindashvili at only 5 years of age!

But something is not mentionned here - she became the youngest USSR champion of all times - think she was 15 when she won the title

Apr-10-07  Moondoll: I think resignation is completely dependant on each game and each opponent. I've played games and resigned down a minor piece early and I've played games down several pieces and come back to win. I think each player should know their own limitations and know when, barring several obvious blunders, there is no way to win a game and that it is time to "lay down your arms". Sometimes it is more fun to let your opponent play out the win, sometimes it's not worth either players time.
Sep-06-07  jackmandoo: <Moondoll.> Chess isn't about fun for some. For the competetive and serious player it's about truth. Logic. If you are several peices down and without compensaton a loss is inevitable. It is therefore, time to resign.
Jul-04-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  brankat: Happy Birthday Svetlana!
Aug-16-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Quote of the Day

" Lose with grace and resign in a timely manner. If you are a lot of material down and don't have sufficient compensation, it is time to lay down your arms. This way you show your respect for both chess and your opponent. "

-- Svetlana Matveeva

Aug-16-08  GeauxCool: How is playing a game through showing any less respect? I think when you resign, whether it be when you have reached your own limit at which you think you cannot come back, or whether it be at a checkmate is dependent entirely on your style and attitude and not on some overarching rule of what is gracious and what is not. If I value my time being spent on a game that is theoretically lost (but that I might come back from and draw through an opponent blunder, however unlikely) as being superior to some sense of temporal efficiency for either you or I, then why shouldn't I go ahead and play it? I'd guess she's talking about somewhat higher level chess here. At the GM level two or three pawns or a piece vs pawn, absent compensation, is sufficient to warrant resignation. At the amateur level anything can happen, so you play on a little longer. In quick chess, never resign. I've won and lost rook-deficit positions often. I think resignation is completely dependant on each game and each opponent. I've played games and resigned down a minor piece early and I've played games down several pieces and come back to win. I think each player should know their own limitations and know when, barring several obvious blunders, there is no way to win a game and that it is time to "lay down your arms". Sometimes it is more fun to let your opponent play out the win, sometimes it's not worth either players time. Anybody that would be against resignation is still a patzer. Chess isn't about fun for some. For the competetive and serious player it's about truth. Logic. If you are several peices down and without compensaton a loss is inevitable. It is therefore, time to resign.
Sep-03-08  Abdooss: Matveeva was born in 1969, and her games started in 1973. She started to play competitively when she was 4 years old? (against Women World Champion Nona Gaprandashvilli when she was 5 ????)
Jul-27-09  popski: <Abdooss> That's interesting indeed! And she draw with Women World Champion Nona Gaprandashvilli when she was 5!?! WoW!!
Jul-27-09  percyblakeney: The first games were played by some other Matveeva, since Svetlana hardly participated on the highest level in the Russian Championship when she was four and five years old, to then take a more than dozen year long break from chess...
Mar-17-11  Penguincw: Quote of the Day:
< "Lose with grace and resign in a timely manner. If you are a lot of material down and don't have sufficient compensation, it is time to lay down your arms. This way you show your respect for both chess and your opponent." >
Jan-11-12  Rook e2: I don't agree with the quote. I don't have to resign to show respect to my opponent. Always try to counter with one last all out attack. Especially under time pressure some opponents lose their nerves.
Jan-11-12  Penguincw: Quote of the Day

< "Lose with grace and resign in a timely manner. If you are a lot of material down and don't have sufficient compensation, it is time to lay down your arms. This way you show your respect for both chess and your opponent." >

Hmm. Same as Mar 17th. :-\

Dec-30-12  Duque Roquero: Excellent quote! I don't understand people who like to be killed like a rat in a kitchen instead of resigning just when the situation have turned hopeless. <Rook e2> Read carefully. It says: without sufficient compensation. Obviously time trouble is one kind of compensation.
Oct-09-13  Penguincw: K Quote of the Day K

< "Lose with grace and resign in a timely manner. If you are a lot of material down and don't have sufficient compensation, it is time to lay down your arms. This way you show your respect for both chess and your opponent." >

-Svetlana Matveeva

Oct-09-13  John Abraham: Looks like they are recycling quotes.
Oct-09-13  Penguincw: < John Abraham: Looks like they are recycling quotes. >

Yep. This one will probably be repeated again sometime in the middle of 2014 based on previous dates.

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