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Rodolfo Tan Cardoso
Number of games in database: 140
Years covered: 1956 to 1978
Last FIDE rating: 2330
Highest rating achieved in database: 2410
Overall record: +41 -69 =30 (40.0%)*
   * Overall winning percentage = (wins+draws/2) / total games
      Based on games in the database; may be incomplete.

MOST PLAYED OPENINGS
With the White pieces:
 Sicilian (35) 
    B91 B90 B32 B81 B43
 Sicilian Najdorf (11) 
    B91 B90 B92 B98 B99
 French Defense (6) 
    C00 C16 C01 C05 C07
 Sicilian Scheveningen (5) 
    B81 B84 B80 B83
 English, 1 c4 e5 (4) 
    A20
 English (4) 
    A15 A10
With the Black pieces:
 Sicilian (13) 
    B90 B94 B93 B51 B27
 Sicilian Najdorf (8) 
    B90 B94 B93 B92
 Robatsch (8) 
    B06
 Nimzo Indian (7) 
    E40 E30 E56 E38 E26
 Uncommon Opening (7) 
    A00 B00
 Queen's Pawn Game (5) 
    A40
Repertoire Explorer

NOTABLE GAMES: [what is this?]
   R T Cardoso vs Fischer, 1957 1-0
   Fischer vs R T Cardoso, 1957 1/2-1/2
   R T Cardoso vs Fischer, 1957 1/2-1/2
   R T Cardoso vs Bronstein, 1958 1-0
   R T Cardoso vs Tal, 1958 1/2-1/2
   I Bahgat vs R T Cardoso, 1957 0-1

NOTABLE TOURNAMENTS: [what is this?]
   World Junior Championship (1957)
   1st Burroughs Computers Grandmaster (1978)
   Manila (1973)
   Portoroz Interzonal (1958)

GAME COLLECTIONS: [what is this?]
   World Junior Championship, Toronto 1957 by FSR

Search Sacrifice Explorer for Rodolfo Tan Cardoso
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FIDE player card for Rodolfo Tan Cardoso


RODOLFO TAN CARDOSO
(born Dec-25-1937, died Aug-21-2013, 75 years old) Philippines

[what is this?]
Rodolfo Tan Cardoso was born in Anda in the Philippines in 1937. He was Philippine Champion in 1958 and 1963. Winning the Asian zonal tournament of 1957-58, Cardoso was awarded the IM title for scoring two-thirds of the possible points in the Zonal, and a berth in the Portoroz Interzonal (1958).

Cardoso finished 19th out of 21 players at the Interzonal, but his performance was notable for R T Cardoso vs Bronstein, 1958, his last-round upset of David Bronstein, which kept Bronstein out of the Bled-Zagreb-Belgrade Candidates (1959). Cardoso later remarked that he regretted that victory more than any of his losses in the tournament, since Bronstein was his idol.

Cardoso discovered Wesley So after spotting the youngster playing queen sacrifices in junior tournaments at age nine.

Wikipedia article: Rodolfo Tan Cardoso


 page 1 of 6; games 1-25 of 140  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. Portisch vs R T Cardoso ½-½74 1956 MoscowE30 Nimzo-Indian, Leningrad
2. I Bahgat vs R T Cardoso  0-156 1957 World Junior ChampionshipC31 King's Gambit Declined, Falkbeer Counter Gambit
3. V Selimanov vs R T Cardoso  1-041 1957 World Junior ChampionshipE56 Nimzo-Indian, 4.e3, Main line with 7...Nc6
4. R T Cardoso vs Fischer ½-½56 1957 Fischer - CardosoB91 Sicilian, Najdorf, Zagreb (Fianchetto) Variation
5. Fischer vs R T Cardoso ½-½46 1957 Fischer - CardosoB90 Sicilian, Najdorf
6. R T Cardoso vs P Bates  1-025 1957 World Junior ChampionshipB09 Pirc, Austrian Attack
7. B Rabinowitz vs R T Cardoso  ½-½62 1957 World Junior ChampionshipC00 French Defense
8. R T Cardoso vs Fischer 0-136 1957 Fischer - CardosoB55 Sicilian, Prins Variation, Venice Attack
9. Fischer vs R T Cardoso 1-046 1957 Fischer - CardosoB90 Sicilian, Najdorf
10. R T Cardoso vs T Makelainen  1-040 1957 World Junior ChampionshipE10 Queen's Pawn Game
11. A Jongsma vs R T Cardoso  1-065 1957 World Junior ChampionshipE62 King's Indian, Fianchetto
12. R T Cardoso vs Fischer 1-040 1957 Fischer - CardosoB91 Sicilian, Najdorf, Zagreb (Fianchetto) Variation
13. Fischer vs R T Cardoso 1-031 1957 Fischer - CardosoB90 Sicilian, Najdorf
14. R T Cardoso vs M Gerusel 1-037 1957 World Junior ChampionshipB29 Sicilian, Nimzovich-Rubinstein
15. R T Cardoso vs Fischer 0-152 1957 Fischer - CardosoB98 Sicilian, Najdorf
16. F Jobin vs R T Cardoso  0-163 1957 World Junior ChampionshipE81 King's Indian, Samisch
17. R T Cardoso vs J Aldrete  1-033 1957 World Junior ChampionshipC16 French, Winawer
18. Fischer vs R T Cardoso 1-032 1957 Fischer - CardosoA07 King's Indian Attack
19. R T Cardoso vs Lombardy  0-167 1957 World Junior ChampionshipB92 Sicilian, Najdorf, Opocensky Variation
20. R T Cardoso vs R Hallerod  0-156 1957 World Junior ChampionshipB95 Sicilian, Najdorf, 6...e6
21. R T Cardoso vs J Sherwin  1-041 1958 Portoroz InterzonalD85 Grunfeld
22. R T Cardoso vs J Penrose 0-142 1958 OlympiadA42 Modern Defense, Averbakh System
23. E Chalabi vs R T Cardoso  1-052 1958 13th olm final CA17 English
24. Averbakh vs R T Cardoso  ½-½60 1958 Portoroz InterzonalA34 English, Symmetrical
25. R T Cardoso vs E Chalabi  1-032 1958 13th olm qual. group 3E80 King's Indian, Samisch Variation
 page 1 of 6; games 1-25 of 140  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2) | Cardoso wins | Cardoso loses  

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 5 OF 5 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Sep-03-13  epistle: whence legitimate advantage may be derived. These are not only manifold but multiform, and lie frequently among recesses of thought altogether inaccessible to the ordinary understanding. To observe attentively is to remember distinctly; and, so far, the concentrative chess-player will do very well at whist; while the rules of Hoyle (themselves based upon the mere mechanism of the game) are sufficiently and generally comprehensible. Thus to have a retentive memory, and to proceed by "the book," are points commonly regarded as the sum total of good playing. But it is in matters beyond the limits of mere rule that the skill of the analyst is evinced. He makes, in silence, a host of observations and inferences. So, perhaps, do his companions; and the difference in the extent of the information obtained, lies not so much in the validity of the inference as in the quality of the observation. The necessary knowledge is that of what to observe. Our player confines himself not at all; nor, because the game is the object, does he reject deductions from things external to the game. He examines the countenance of his partner, comparing it carefully with that of each of his opponents. He considers the mode of assorting the cards in each hand; often counting trump by trump, and honor by honor, through the glances bestowed by their holders upon each. He notes every variation of face as the play progresses, gathering a fund of thought from the differences in the expression of certainty, of surprise, of triumph, or chagrin. From the manner of gathering up a trick he judges whether the person taking it can make another in the suit. He recognizes what is played through feint, by the air with which it is thrown upon the table. A casual or inadvertent word; the accidental dropping or turning of a card, with the accompanying anxiety or carelessness in regard to its concealment; the counting of the tricks, with the order of their arrangement; embarrassment, hesitation, eagerness or trepidation --all afford, to his apparently intuitive perception, indications of the true state of affairs. The first two or three rounds having been played, he is in full possession of the contents of each hand, and thenceforward puts down his cards with as absolute a precision of purpose as if the rest of the party had turned outward the faces of their own.

The analytical power should not be confounded with simple ingenuity; for while the analyst is necessarily ingenious, the ingenious man often remarkably incapable of analysis. The constructive or combining power, by which ingenuity is usually manifested, and which the phrenologists (I believe erroneously) have assigned a separate organ, supposing it a primitive faculty, has been so frequently seen in those whose intellect bordered otherwise upon idiocy, as to have attracted general observation among writers on morals. Between ingenuity and the analytic ability there exists a difference far greater, indeed, than that between the fancy and the imagination, but of a character very strictly analogous. It will found, in fact, that the ingenious are always fanciful, and the truly imaginative never otherwise than analytic.

Sep-03-13  epistle: that was the beginning of a story written by a famous author. Guess who wrote that?
Sep-03-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  wordfunph: Edgar Allan Poe on Chess and Checkers

http://secretplans.org/post/3478156...

Sep-03-13  epistle: It's from the story "The Murders in the Rue Morgue."
Sep-04-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  mistermac: I am sad that Rodolfo Tan Cardoso has departed. I had hoped that I might renew his acquaintance through this medium of the Internet, which did not exist when I met him in 1967, and he was a delightful guest at our house during the Tournament to celebrate the Centenary of the Canterbury Chess Club.

The other famous players Of those I can remember were Yuri Averbach and Ortvin Sarapu.

I send my condolences to all who were dear to him, and the nation who was so proud of him.

Sep-05-13  epistle: A very interesting Canterbury tale, <mistermac.> Any pictures? It would be nice to see them when they were much, much younger 45 years ago.
Sep-05-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Abdel Irada: <epistle: It's from the story "The Murders in the Rue Morgue.">

A ground-breaking mystery in many respects, among them the introduction in C. Auguste Dupin of a precursor to the more famous detective Sherlock Holmes, with special attention in both cases to the seemingly enigmatic results obtained by both sleuths through the application of deductive reasoning.

Sep-05-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  mistermac: <epistle>
Your post has prompted me to send the email below to a Mr. Craig Hall, currently the contact at Canterbury Chess Club, in order to see if I can get any photos, if such exist, or any other material on Rudy, as he was then affectionately known in New Zealand, as I think around the world. Whether that name suited him or others in the Phillipines, I do not know, but no offence was intended, but perhaps that name was not worthy of the dignity that he deserved. It is evident that he bacame very famous in his country, and my acquaintance with him was very brief, although vivid, as vivid as any photo.

Cardoso wss a modest and extremely affable and lovable man. He was quite colourful in his dress, but was probably not wearing anything else than was customary in his country.

He was in NZ to play Chess, not to be my companion, so I, to my regret, was only an acquaintance, and could hardly presume to say a friend. So, apart from his friendly and grateful reception of my mother's hospitality, I did not get to really know him as much as I would have liked. He was very popular, and everyone wanted to know him.

He was no mean Chess player, and a very dangerous and inventive opponent. He was found fit to have a March with Bobby Fischer in his youth.

But, enough for now, and if anyone here wishes to know more, I will be pleased to try and answer, and I will myself try and find out more about this remarkable man, and if possible about the 1967 Tournament, and the Canterbury Chess Club.

The email I mentioned follows.

<Dear Mr Craig Hall,

Recently, Cardoso passed away. I was a member of the Club, of very modest playing ability, at the time of the Centenary Tournament. I well remember Al Hollander and Bealey Avenue, (I was born at Lindhurst, a hopsital in that august and long street), and the Friday night Tournaments, where drinking was as prominent as the Chess. Beer and whisky did not improve my play, but we had a good time.

Al persuaded my mother to put Rudy up during this Tournament, so he was a guest at our house in Blighs Rd, (which was attached to my father's McNamara's Grocery Store), and a pleasant one at that. My father later worked for Al at the Airport Duty Free Store. I was John, same name as my father, known better as Jack.

I am currently a member of the Chessgames.com website, and run a small forum under my Internet handle of mistermac, as I and all the male ancestors have been invariably called.

I am researching about Cardoso, and the Chess Tournament of 1967, and would be pleased if you could help me by pointing me to any sources.

I would be pleased to answer any questions you may have that might help give you a flavour of those times, especially under Mr Hollander.

Kind regards,

John McNamara (aka mistermac)
Unit 3 18/20 Mooki St, Miranda, 2228, NSW

Sydney Ph 95254588

email mistermac39@hotmail.com>

Sep-05-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  TheFocus: Does anyone know if Rudolfo ever annotated any of his games against Fischer from that youthful match?
Sep-05-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  mistermac: <TheFocus: Does anyone know if Rudolfo ever annotated any of his games against Fischer from that youthful match?>

I am open to contradiction here, but I fancy from recollections at the time that Rudy and Bobby even though Fischer was 5 years younger, were that the genius of Bobby was, as for most opponents, except the absolute best, too much. I think that Cardoso only managed a draw in the short match. So, I doubt if Cardoso did many annotations, but I seem to recall that CJS Purdy may have published some in his magazine. Was it called Chess World. I am getting old, only 3 years younger than Cardoso, so I am not too reliant on some facts. But, I can tell you as I said of the vivid impression the personality and dedication to Chess that he had. I am wondering what his normal profession was. Perhaps it was Chess.

His later life shows a gift for teaching youngsters.

Sep-05-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  mistermac: No, the result was 5.5 vs 1.5, and Cardoso won one game.
Sep-05-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  TheFocus: <mistermac> Rudy also won one game. I was hoping he had annotated it.

Bobby annotated one of their games in an obscure journal.

Sep-05-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  mistermac: <Cardoso Fischer Match>

For reader's and Focus' Information,
I put that in the site's Search function, and all the games came up.

Sep-05-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  TheFocus: <mistermac> You might want to view Game Collection: 1957 Fischer - Cardoso Match.
Sep-05-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  mistermac: That's how I got it in focus, Focus. Where the Sons Raise Mate, Fisch or Whatever.
Sep-20-13  pinoymaster77: RIP IM Rudy, nice piece by Bobby Ang :

IM Rodolfo Tan Cardoso (1937-2013)

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Chess Piece
Bobby Ang

IM RODOLFO Tan Cardoso passed away last August 21, 2013 after suffering a heart attack. He was a chess giant here in the Philippines.

Born on Christmas Day 1937 in Anda, Pangasinan, he was really the pride of Alaminos. Rudy first appeared in the local chess consciousness when he won the 1956 National Junior Championship sponsored at that time by the Manila Times Publishing Co. This victory carried with it a four-year scholarship and also entitled him to represent the country in the 1957 Toronto World Junior Championship. In those days nobody had ever heard of Asians playing chess, and so it was a bit of a surprise that he finished 5th in the event (the winner was William Lombardy, who scored 11 wins, no losses, no draws -- the first and last time anyone had ever blanked the opposition in the event). IM Rodolfo Tan Cardoso
RELATED STORIES

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He was the first ever Filipino to prove himself capable of competing on the world stage.

1) Philippine Champion in 1958 and 1963

2) Asian Champion in 1956 by winning the 1956 Zonals held in Baguio City. By virtue of that win he represented the continent (!) in the 1958 Portoroz Interzonal.

3) Pepsi-Cola sponsored a match between Rudy and Bobby Fischer in 1957 which the American won 6-2 with 5 wins 2 draws and 1 loss. Rudy lost the match but at least won 1 game, the only time Bobby ever lost to a Filipino.

4) IM Cardoso represented the Philippines in four Olympiads: 1956 Moscow (where he won the silver medal for best overall 4th board performance, 1958 Munich, 1972 Skopje and the 1974 “Dream Team” to the Nice Olympiad (Torre, Cardoso, Renato Naranja, Rosendo Balinas, Ramon Lontoc, Glenn Bordonada).

5) By virtue of his sparkling performance in the 1956 Moscow Olympiad the International Chess Federation gave him the International Master title. He thus became Asia’s (and the Philippines’) 1st International Master.

I will be writing a lot more about Mang Rudy, but for today let us concentrate on his most famous game.

In the 1950s David Bronstein was very highly regarded in the chess world. He was known as a creative genius and a fiery tactician

His performances during that period:

1) Won the 1948 Saltsjobaden Interzonal

2) Tied for first with Isaak Boleslavsky in the 1950 Candidates Tournament in Budapest. Bronstein became the eventual Candidates’ winner over Boleslavsky in their Moscow playoff match.

3) Fought Mikhail Botvinnik to a 12-12 draw in their 1951 World Championship match.

4) Tied for 2nd-4th places with Keres and Reshevsky in the Zurich Candidates’ Tournament behind Vassily Smyslov

5) Won the 1955 Gothenburg Interzonal

6) Tied for 3rd-7th places in the Amsterdam Candidates’ Tournament behind Vassily Smyslov and Paul Keres.

Bronstein was a big favorite to win the 1958 Portoroz Interzonal and make his 4th attempt at the world title.

Shortly before the 1958 Portoroz Interzonal a television program “I’ve Got a Secret” sponsored a trip to Moscow for Bobby Fischer. His secret on the TV show was that he was the US Chess Champion. Anyway he gave several interviews during this trip and, in response to a question on how he thought he would do in the upcoming Interzonal remarked that on the whole he would have expected to take first place, but that this would be difficult, since first place could be taken by Bronstein.

Tal remarked in his book “The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal” that this was the first and last time that Fischer voluntarily put someone else ahead of himself. * * *
.

Sep-20-13  pinoymaster77: Cardoso, Rodolfo Tan -- Bronstein, David I [B07]
Portoroz Interzonal (21), 1958

1.e4 d6 2.d4 g6 3.Bc4 Bg7 4.Ne2

Not in the books, but anyway Rudy does not read the books. He has his own set-up in mind with f3, Be3 and Qd2 to follow.

4...Nf6 5.Nbc3 Nbd7 6.f3 c6 7.a4 a5 8.Bb3 0-0 9.Be3 e6 10.Qd2 Rb8 11.Nd1!

Preventing 11...b5 because of 12.axb5 cxb5 13.Qxa5. If Black retakes the pawn with the rook 12...Rxb5 then 13.Ba4.

11...b6 12.Nf2 Ba6 13.g4 c5 14.h4! h5

[14...c4 15.Ba2 simply makes the wayward c-pawn a target. However, the text move is not the best either. With the benefit of hindsight Black should have played 14...Bxd2 to get the soon-to-be-powerful knight out of his hair.]

15.Ng3 hxg4 16.fxg4 d5 17.h5

[17.e5? cxd4 18.Bxd4 Nh7 wins the e5-pawn. If 19.Qe3 then 19...Qc7]

17...c4 18.Ba2

Black’s position is very bad. Cardoso is threatening e5 followed by c3 and Bb1 with a powerful kingside attack. Bronstein decides to sacrifice a pawn to get some activity plus to keep the a2-bishop shut out.

18...c3?! 19.bxc3

[19.Qxc3?! is precisely what Bronstein wanted, because of 19...Rc8 20.Qd2 Qc7 21.Bf4 (21.c3?? Qxg3) 21...Qxc2]

19...Qc7 20.e5

[20.Bf4 e5 complicates things too much.]

20...Nh7 21.Nd3

The threat is 22.hxg6 fxg6 23.Nf4.

21...g5 22.h6 Bh8 23.Nh5

[23.Bxg5? f6 white’s e-pawn is pinned]

23...Rbc8 24.Rc1

[24.Bxg5 Qxc3 25.Qxc3 Rxc3 26.Bd2 Rxc2 Black’s pieces are coming to life]

24...Qxc3 25.Qxc3 Rxc3 26.Bd2?

Cardoso slips up. He should have played 26.Kd2 and I will show you later why. Bronstein gets a chance to come up after being under pressure from the opening but his nerves fail and he continues weakly.

26...Ra3 27.Bb1

[27.Bb3? Bxd3! that is why]

27...Rxa4?!

He should have exchanged first with 27...Bxd3 28.cxd3 Rxa4 because now white’s bishop is shut off.

28.c3! f6?!

[28...Rc4 maintains the advantage]

29.Ng7! Ra1?

[29...fxe5 30.Nxe6 Rc8 is a good way to continue, but not 29...Bxg7?

30.hxg7 Kxg7 31.Nb2 white wins because of the double attack on h7 and a4.]

30.Nf2!

White now has the threat to win Black’s rook with 31.Bxh7+

30...Rxb1

Forced as the b1-bishop is too powerful. For example 30...Ra3 31.Nxe6 Rf7 32.Nd8 Rf8 33.e6! Rxd8 34.Bg6! wins.

31.Rxb1 fxe5 32.Nxe6 Rc8 33.Rh3 exd4 34.Nxd4 Bxd4 35.cxd4 Rc6 36.Rbb3!

Cardoso’s rook enters the game via the 3rd rank. He is already winning at this stage.

36...Kf7 37.Rbe3 Ndf6

[37...a4? 38.Bb4]

38.Re5 Re6 39.Rxe6! Kxe6 40.Rb3 Nd7 41.Nh3 Kf6 <D>

Position after 41...Kf6

The game was adjourned at this point. Next morning the envelope was opened.

42.Nxg5! 1-0

Black resigns. Everything is lost after 42.Nxg5:

1) 42...Nhf8 43.h7 Kg7 44.Rh3;

2) 42...Ndf8 43.Rxb6+;

3) 42...Kg6 43.Nxh7 Kxh7 44.Re3;

4) 42...Nxg5 43.Bxg5+ Kg6 44.Re3 Nf8 45.Be7 Nh7 46.Re6+ Kf7 47.Rxb6.

This game destroyed Bronstein. This was his first-ever loss in an Interzonal after 58 games in which he went undefeated -- the 19 games of Saltsjobaden 1948, 20 games of Goteborg 1955, and previous 19 games of Portoroz. And he never made it into the Candidates again.

“You see, that ‘fat’ point that I took from Bronstein saddened me more than any defeat at the tournament. Bronstein is my idol. Ever since I started playing chess, his games have been... (Cardoso did not continue his train of thought but simply added) That’s the way that chess is. What could I do?” (from Grandmasters in Profile by D. Bjelica).

History has not been kind to IM Rodolfo Tan Cardoso:

1) His name is misspelled in the major databases as “Radolfo”. For some reason this has never been corrected.

2) His real name is Rodolfo Tan -- this was revealed by me by Meralco chess club President Rolly Sol Cruz. As is the custom at that time Mang Rudy spelled his name as Rodolfo Tan y Cardoso and somehow the “y” dropped out.

3) And, the biggest cruelty, chess historians have often referred to Bronstein’s “big blunder” causing him to lose to the unknown player Cardoso. The implication was that Bronstein was winning but fell to a cheapo trap. Also, some sources have mentioned that electrical power failed in the playing area due to a thunderstorm around move 27, and he was unable to regain concentration. Let me state firmly that the power interruption affected both players, and that Cardoso had the edge for much of the game. At the time of 41...Kf6 Bronstein was already lost -- the move played just allowed Cardoso to spring an attractive combination.

So there.

We will continue our stories on Monday.

Sep-23-13  pinoymaster77: Bobby Ang's Chess Piece for Sept 22 :

Cardoso adventures

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Chess Piece
Bobby Ang

IM RODOLFO Tan Cardoso passed away last August 21st, 2013 after suffering a heart attack. Back in the 90s I used to go to the Agora Complex in San Juan where he had a small air-conditioned office and we would play blitz and he would give me some lessons. He was a very kind person and I liked him a lot. RELATED STORIES

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Chess Piece -- Bobby Ang: "World Cup champion"

In 2000, when the National Chess Federation of the Philippines (NCFP) replaced the Philippine Chess Federation (PCF) as the officially recognized chess governing body in the country I had the occasion to work with him again. You see, there was a small budget for the “National Chess Coach” -- previously they appointed someone in the office staff as the coach so that the allocated coaching stipend can serve as his salary. I as the Executive Director of the NCFP was having none of that and appointed Rudy Tan Cardoso as the coach -- he would go regularly to the Federation office in Timog Avenue to help out and coach the young players, especially the women’s Olympiad team. And he did very well.

I remember the story about the 1956 Moscow Olympiad. The Manila Times refused to sponsor the team because the event was held in the “Evil Empire”, the Soviet Union. The Manila Chronicle stepped in at the last time and the foursome of Glicerio Badilles, Florencio Campomanes, Carlos Benitez and Rodolfo Tan Cardoso was able to go to Moscow, Soviet Union.

Rudy surprised everybody, including himself, by scoring 11 wins, four draws and two losses to win the silver medal for best overall 4th board performance in the event. By virtue of this great performance Hon. Florencio Campomanes petitioned the International Chess Federation (FIDE) to award the International Master title to Rudy. This was granted and he became Asia’s (and the Philippines’) first International Master.

He was a humble person. While giving lessons Rudy would use his games as examples to show the inner workings of the chess mind. I noticed that he showed his wins against Bronstein and Fischer without mentioning the names of his opponents.

I showed you last Friday the Cardoso vs Bronstein game.

Sep-23-13  pinoymaster77: Back in 1957 the Pepsi Cola Co. sponsored an eight game match between the US Junior Champion (Fischer) and the Philippine Junior Champion (Cardoso). It was pretty one-sided but Mang Rudy had a chance to show that you should never under-estimate the resourcefulness of a Filipino. * * * Cardoso, Rodolfo Tan -- Fischer, Robert James [B91]
Fischer-Cardoso m New York (3), 1957

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.g3

Personally this writer has had a lot of success with this move against the Sicilian. Black players tend to give it no respect but it has a lot of venom: the knight on d4 is going to retreat to e2, avoiding exchanges and fortifying the other knight on c3. In the meantime he will fianchetto his bishop, castle kingside and then pawn storm the black position.

6...e5 7.Nde2 Be7 8.Bg2 0-0 9.0-0 Nbd7 10.h3 b5 11.a4

Fischer had encountered this same position in the US open earlier in 1957, and his opponent Garais continued here 11.Be3 Bb7 12.f4 Qc7 13.g4?! b4! 14.Nd5 Nxd5 15.exd5 exf4 16.Rxf4? Bg5 17.Re4 Bxe3+ 18.Rxe3 Rae8 19.Rxe8 Rxe8 20.Qd2 Qc5+ 21.Kh1 Qf2 0-1 Garais, I-Fischer, R/58th US Open 1957. White resigned because after 22.Re1 Re3 followed by ...Nd7-f6-e4 finishes off the job.

11...b4 12.Nd5 Nxd5 13.Qxd5?

After seeing Black’s reply I have no doubt that white will always play 13.exd5 in the future.

13...Qc7! 14.c3?

[14.Qxa8? Nb6 of course loses the queen, but the text is no good either, as after ...Bb7 and ...Nc5 Rudy’s e-pawn is history. It looks like; 14.Be3 is the only move here, planning to exchange the bishop off for Black’s knight anytime it gets to c5]

14...Bb7 15.Qd1 Nc5

The initiative is firmly in Black’s hands now.

16.f3

Forced, but now the king position is full of holes.

16...a5 17.Be3 Ba6 18.Rc1 Rab8 19.f4 bxc3 20.Rxc3

A sad necessity. After 20.bxc3 Rb2 21.Rc2 (21.Rf2? Nd3) 21...Nxa4 wins

20...Rxb2 21.Rf2 Qb6 22.Rc1!

Good defence, right at the time when Black cannot play ...Nd3.

22...Qb3 23.Nc3 exf4 24.Rxb2 Qxb2 25.Bxc5

It looks like 25.gxf4 Bb7 26.Bd4 just might hold.

25...dxc5 26.gxf4 c4

The text move with the intention of ...Bc5+ and ...Be3 is good, but even better is 26...Bd3! 27.Nd5 Bh4 28.Kh1 (28.Rxc5?? Bf2+) 28...c4 and Black has a firm grip.

27.Nd5 Bc5+ 28.Kh2 Bb4 29.Rc2 Qb3 30.e5

Rudy is putting up a hell of a fight. Now he will play Be4, Qh5 and Nf6+

30...Qxa4?

Fischer got greedy. 30...Qd3! would have prevented Be4.

31.Be4! <D>

Position after 31.Be4

Black is no longer winning. White threatens mate with 32.Bxh7+ Kxh7 33.Qh5+ Kg8 34.Nf6+ gxf6 35.Rg2.

31...g6

[31...h6 32.Qg1! (32.Nf6+ doesn’t work because of 32...Kh8 (32...gxf6 33.Rg2+ Kh8 34.Qh5 mate next move) 33.Nh5 c3 34.Qg4 g6 35.Nf6 (35.Bxg6?? Rg8) 35...Rd8 36.Qh4 Bf8) 32...Kh8 33.Rg2 Rg8 34.Qa7! wins for White]

32.Qg4?

[32.Nf6+ Kg7 33.Qd4! should be considered]

32...Bb7?

The only move is 32...f5 33.exf6 Qe8 34.f5 Qe5+ 35.Kh1 Bc8 The pendulum swings in Black’s favor again.

33.Nf6+ Kg7 34.Qh4 Rc8

Now Fischer realizes that 34...Rh8 is met by 35.Nh5+! Kg8 (35...gxh5 36.Qf6+ Kf8 37.e6; 35...Kf8 36.Qf6 Rg8 37.e6 Qe8 38.Bxb7 Qxe6 39.Qd8+ Qe8 40.Qxe8+ Kxe8 41.Nf6+ and White is a rook up) 36.Qf6 Bf8 37.e6 Qe8 38.Bf5! the intention is to play 39.exf7+ and 40.Be6 38...Bc8 39.Qd4! and now, finally, I can no longer see any defence for Black.

35.Qxh7+ Kf8 36.e6! Rc7 37.Qg8+ Ke7 38.Qxf7+ Kd8 39.Rd2+ Bd5 40.Rxd5+ 1-0

Fischer resigned, stood up and just silently walked off. Clearly he was very upset by this loss.

Sep-23-13  pinoymaster77: Rudy Cardoso should have won this one too:
* * *
Fischer, Robert James -- Cardoso, Rodolfo Tan [B87]
Fischer-Cardoso m New York (6), 1957

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Bc4 e6 7.0-0 b5 8.Bb3 Bb7

A common mistake here is 8...Nbd7 when after 9.Re1 Be7 (9...Nc5 10.Bd5!) 10.Bxe6! would give white hopes for a brilliancy prize.

9.Bg5 Nbd7

This is a minefield. 9...b4?! 10.Na4 Bxe4?! 11.Re1 d5 12.Bxf6!? gxf6 13.Qh5 leaves Black struggling.

10.Bxe6!?

With a 4-1 lead I guess Fischer thought he could indulge himself. No one has repeated this sacrifice since. Nowadays people play 10.Re1 h6 (10...Be7? 11.Bxe6 fxe6 12.Nxe6 Qa5 13.Nxg7+ Kf7 14.Nf5 White has a winning attack. Kaidanov, G-De Vault, D/Dallas 1999 1-0 (38)) 11.Bh4 g5 (11...Be7? the same sacrifice still works: 12.Bxe6 fxe6 13.Nxe6 Qb6 14.Nxg7+ Kf7 15.Nf5 White’s loss in this game had nothing to do with the opening, Solomunovic, I-Enders, P/Baden-Baden 1993 0-1 (56)) 12.Bg3 with a good fight ahead.

10...fxe6 11.Nxe6 Qc8 12.Nxf8 Rxf8 13.Qxd6 Qc6 14.Rad1 Qxd6 15.Rxd6 0-0-0 16.Rfd1 h6!

[16...Bxe4? 17.Nxe4 Nxe4 18.Bxd8 Nxd6 19.Be7; 16...b4 17.Nd5 Bxd5 (17...Nxe4? 18.Nb6+! Nxb6 19.Rxd8+ Rxd8 20.Rxd8+ Kc7 21.Rg8!) 18.exd5 Nb8 simplifies the position, but it is not at all sure that black can win this.]

17.Be3 Ne5?

Why didn’t he take the pawn? If 17...Nxe4 18.Nxe4 Bxe4 19.Rxa6 Nb8 20.Rad6 (20.Rxd8+?? Rxd8 loses the rook to the threatened back rank mate) 20...Bxc2 21.Rxd8+ Rxd8 22.Rc1 Nc6! once again the back rank mate prevents white from recapturing the piece and after Black’s ...Rd1+ Rudy would have a won endgame.

18.Rxd8+ Rxd8 19.Rxd8+ Kxd8 20.f3 Kd7 21.Kf2 Bc6 22.b3 Ke6 23.h3 Bb7 24.Ne2 Nc6 25.h4 Bc8 26.Nd4+ Nxd4 27.Bxd4 g5 28.hxg5 hxg5 29.Bxf6 Kxf6 30.c3

Black has an extra piece but if he is not careful he might even lose this endgame.

30...Be6 31.Ke3 Ke5 32.g3 a5 33.f4+ gxf4+ 34.gxf4+ Kd6 35.f5 Bg8 36.Kd4 Bh7 37.c4

[37.e5+ Ke7! (37...Kc6? 38.Ke4 Kc5 39.Kf4 Kd5 40.c4+ bxc4 41.bxc4+ Kxc4 42.e6 wins) 38.f6+ Ke6 39.Kc5 Bd3 holds the draw]

37...bxc4 38.bxc4 Kc6 39.a3 a4 40.Ke5 Bg8 41.Kf6 Bxc4 42.Ke7 Kc5 43.e5 Kd4 44.Kd6 Ke4 45.f6 Kf5 46.Kc5 1/2-1/2

In the 1958 Portoroz Interzonal Bobby Fischer tied for 5th with Icelandic GM Fridrik Olafsson and qualified for the Candidates’ Tournament. He was clearly an up-and-coming superstar and the Soviets did all that they can to beat him, but try as they might neither Tal, Petrosian.

That is why before Rudy Cardoso’s game with Bobby Fischer in Portoroz he surprised everyone by announcing he would beat Fischer, and when he sat down to play with the American genius Rudy asked “would you like to resign now and save time?” It was then that everyone knew that the two of them were friends and it was all a joke.

They all had a good laugh.

Dec-25-13  Penguincw: R.I.P. IM Rodolfo Tan Cardoso. Candidate for Player of the Day for 12/25/14?
Dec-25-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: The bio says:

< He discovered Wesley So after employing Queen sacrifices in junior tournaments at age 9.>

Could someone translate that into English?

Dec-25-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <pinoymaster77....That is why before Rudy Cardoso’s game with Bobby Fischer in Portoroz he surprised everyone by announcing he would beat Fischer, and when he sat down to play with the American genius Rudy asked “would you like to resign now and save time?” It was then that everyone knew that the two of them were friends and it was all a joke.>

Cardoso gave the young title aspirant all he had in that game, of such importance to Fischer: Fischer vs R T Cardoso, 1958.

Dec-26-13  SugarDom: He's really Rodolfo Cardoso Tan.

Tan is his last name.

Dec-26-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: I believe he is really Tan Radolfo y Cardoso.
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