chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

K Rogoff 
Photograph courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.  
Kenneth Rogoff
Number of games in database: 132
Years covered: 1968 to 2012
Last FIDE rating: 2505
Overall record: +38 -29 =64 (53.4%)*
   * Overall winning percentage = (wins+draws/2) / total games
      Based on games in the database; may be incomplete.
      1 exhibition game, odds game, etc. is excluded from this statistic.

MOST PLAYED OPENINGS
With the White pieces:
 English (10) 
    A15 A13 A18 A16 A19
 Sicilian (8) 
    B21 B23 B30 B38 B85
 Ruy Lopez (7) 
    C88 C68 C97 C65 C91
 English, 1 c4 e5 (5) 
    A29 A20 A22
 King's Indian (5) 
    E62 E74 E63 E60
 English, 1 c4 c5 (5) 
    A34 A30 A36
With the Black pieces:
 Sicilian (12) 
    B93 B30 B52 B50 B81
 Caro-Kann (11) 
    B17 B10 B13 B12
 English, 1 c4 c5 (9) 
    A30 A34 A33
 Sicilian Najdorf (5) 
    B93
Repertoire Explorer

NOTABLE GAMES: [what is this?]
   K Rogoff vs R Blumenfeld, 1976 1-0
   Huebner vs K Rogoff, 1972 1/2-1/2
   K Rogoff vs A H Williams, 1969 1/2-1/2
   K Rogoff vs Smejkal, 1976 1-0
   K Rogoff vs Larsen, 1976 1/2-1/2
   K Rogoff vs O Castro, 1976 1-0
   K Rogoff vs Timman, 1971 1-0
   K Rogoff vs Bisguier, 1974 1/2-1/2
   Tal vs K Rogoff, 1976 1/2-1/2
   Huebner vs K Rogoff, 1976 1/2-1/2

NOTABLE TOURNAMENTS: [what is this?]
   Lone Pine (1978)
   Lone Pine (1976)
   US Championship (1974)
   Biel Interzonal (1976)

GAME COLLECTIONS: [what is this?]
   Ken Rogoff Chess Highlights by GumboGambit
   US Championship 1974 by Phony Benoni
   US Championship 1975 by suenteus po 147

Search Sacrifice Explorer for Kenneth Rogoff
Search Google for Kenneth Rogoff
FIDE player card for Kenneth Rogoff


KENNETH ROGOFF
(born Mar-22-1953, 63 years old) United States of America

[what is this?]
Kenneth Saul Rogoff learned chess from his father at age six, but only took up the game in earnest when he received a chess set for his 13th birthday. He was soon recognised as a chess prodigy. By age 14, he was a USCF master and New York State Open Champion, and shortly thereafter became a senior master, the highest US national title. At sixteen, Rogoff dropped out of high school to concentrate on chess, and spent the next several years living primarily in Europe and playing in tournaments there. When eighteen, he made the decision to go to college and pursue a career in economics rather than to become a professional player, although he continued to play and improve for several years afterward.

Rogoff was awarded the IM title in 1974 and the GM title in 1978. He came third in the World Junior Championship of 1971 and finished second in the US Championship of 1975, which doubled as a Zonal competition, one-half point behind Walter Shawn Browne; this result qualified him for the 1976 Interzonal at Biel, where he finished 13-15th. In other tournaments he finished equal first at Norristown 1973 and Orense 1976.

Early in his economics career, Rogoff served as chief economist at the International Monetary Fund and also at the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. He is currently the Thomas D. Cabot Professor of Public Policy and Professor of Economics at Harvard University.

Rogoff's biography in his own words: http://scholar.harvard.edu/rogoff/p...; Rogoff's game against Magnus Carlsen in August 2012 in New York: http://chessbase.com/newsdetail.asp...; Article by Rogoff in Chessbase titled <Rogoff on innovation, unemployment, inequality and dislocation> with particular reference to professional chess: http://chessbase.com/newsdetail.asp...

Wikipedia article: Kenneth Rogoff


 page 1 of 6; games 1-25 of 132  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. Larsen vs K Rogoff ½-½35 1968 Canadian OpenA02 Bird's Opening
2. K Rogoff vs A H Williams ½-½106 1969 World Junior Championship, B FinalA56 Benoni Defense
3. E M Green vs K Rogoff ½-½37 1969 World Junior ChB12 Caro-Kann Defense
4. K Rogoff vs S Spencer 1-020 1969 US Jnr ChpB15 Caro-Kann
5. K Rogoff vs Z Vranesic  0-148 1970 Ontario opB83 Sicilian
6. J Durao vs K Rogoff 0-130 1970 MalagaB93 Sicilian, Najdorf, 6.f4
7. H Pfleger vs K Rogoff  1-059 1970 WchT U26 17thA58 Benko Gambit
8. E Paoli vs K Rogoff 1-026 1971 Liberation tournB06 Robatsch
9. V Tukmakov vs K Rogoff  1-042 1971 Liberation tournD93 Grunfeld, with Bf4 & e3
10. J Durao vs K Rogoff  0-165 1971 MalagaB93 Sicilian, Najdorf, 6.f4
11. Karpov vs K Rogoff 1-026 1971 06, Mayaguez tt-studA22 English
12. Ljubojevic vs K Rogoff 1-029 1971 MalagaB50 Sicilian
13. K Rogoff vs L Day ½-½21 1971 World Student OlympiadA15 English
14. K Rogoff vs Timman 1-048 1971 Malaga 11/138B08 Pirc, Classical
15. Ulf Andersson vs K Rogoff 1-036 1971 OlotB93 Sicilian, Najdorf, 6.f4
16. K Rogoff vs V Tukmakov 1-041 1972 WchT U26 19th fin-AB21 Sicilian, 2.f4 and 2.d4
17. K Rogoff vs Adorjan 1-030 1972 Graz Stu ttB30 Sicilian
18. Huebner vs K Rogoff ½-½12 1972 WchT U26 19th fin-AA15 English
19. Pilnik vs K Rogoff  0-156 1973 NorristownB81 Sicilian, Scheveningen, Keres Attack
20. L Day vs K Rogoff  ½-½23 1973 CAN-opA07 King's Indian Attack
21. K Rogoff vs Suttles 0-147 1973 Ottawa op-CANB06 Robatsch
22. E Paoli vs K Rogoff 0-139 1973 NorristownB06 Robatsch
23. Browne vs K Rogoff 1-041 1974 US ChampionshipB60 Sicilian, Richter-Rauzer
24. K Rogoff vs W Schmidt  ½-½39 1974 Rubinstein memA36 English
25. Saidy vs K Rogoff 0-136 1974 US ChampionshipA15 English
 page 1 of 6; games 1-25 of 132  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2) | Rogoff wins | Rogoff loses  
 

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 8142 OF 8142 ·  Later Kibitzing>
May-05-16  Tomlinsky: Would that be a problem?
May-05-16  cormier: https://www.yahoo.com/news/read-pre...
May-05-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Big Pawn: <tomlinsky: with a peach of a Mexican neck from a 2008 RoadWorn model that craps on anything coming out of Fullerton for my money.>

Ah HA! I knew it.

Well, if it makes you feel better, I have, among others, a Jackson that is Indonesian made, but it's a neck-through and it plays great.

My two strats are American made all the way - no taco necks.

My Les Paul is the real deal too. I used to think it was an ugly, as I put it, "street cone orange" until I read about it. It's actually a semi-rare, one of 300 made Limited Colours edition which they describe as Transparent Amber.

Transparent Amber.

Hmmm, suddenly it looked so much nicer!

May-05-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  WannaBe: Okay, I don't own a MexiStrat, but I do own a semi-MexiCanaStang. Parts of the car were made in Mexico & Canada, but it was assembled in Deerborn, MI.

According to Wiki, Deerborn is 30% Arabic, so most likely, someone of Arabic descent touched or helped in assembling it; so my car is also part Arabic? =))

May-05-16  Jim Bartle: Aren't where the fingers come from more important than where the guitar comes from?
May-05-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  WannaBe: <Jim Bartle> Strings, gotta be the them strings, without them even BB can't play a Gee-tar.
May-05-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Big Pawn: < Tomlinsky: Would that be a problem?>

It would explain your overly sensitive softness. Where I grew up, the way I addressed you was normal and commonplace. Actually, the more one busted someone's balls, the more they liked them.

Go figure.

Different neighborhoods.

We just weren't all sweet, nice and sensitive like, I don't know, the Brits?

When a friend called back in the day, we would answer the phone with, "What do you want you no good bastard?" - and that was like, "Hey man, come on over. We're having a great time - the more the merrier".

Different neighborhoods.

May-05-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  john barleycorn: <WannaBe: ... someone of Arabic descent touched or helped in assembling it; so my car is also part Arabic?>

Does the engine run on camel dung?

May-05-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  diceman: <WannaBe: Okay, I don't own a MexiStrat, but I do own a semi-MexiCanaStang. Parts of the car were made in Mexico & Canada, but it was assembled in Deerborn, MI.>

I had a MexiCanaStang, had to get rid of it.
My MexiStrat refused to drive in it!

May-05-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  diceman: <WannaBe: ... someone of Arabic descent touched or helped in assembling it; so my car is also part Arabic?>

Does it toss gays out the passenger window?

...sunroof?

May-05-16  Jim Bartle: Nigel Tufnel: The sustain, listen to it.
Marty DiBergi: I don't hear anything.
Nigel Tufnel: Well you would though, if it were playing.
May-05-16  Tomlinsky: <JB: Aren't where the fingers come from more important than where the guitar comes from?>

Sure, signature and passion doesn't come in little bags at Walmart's either. But try doing intricate calligraphy using a burnt broomstick.

May-05-16  Jim Bartle: Got it. But once I traded my ratty wooden tennis racket with loose nylon strings with a top player, and used his tournament racket for a little while. He still won every point.
May-05-16  Tomlinsky: Anyway, point was there is plenty of stuff outside the US that isn't crap. China will supply as much crap as we want, and we seem to, but they, and wherever, can supply quality as well... but we would have to pay for that.

The thing with making tons of crap over decades puts you in the position of having the resources and know-how of how to manufacture whatever quality you want... if it is demanded. The 'set-up' was paid for over those decades. If the US thinks it can suddenly start producing better crap than China on the turn of a pin they are deluding themselves. The knowledge learned from getting things 'wrong' is valuable in the long run.

May-05-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  WannaBe: Elephant in the boxing ring one is hilarious!

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news...

May-05-16  Jim Bartle: <The knowledge learned from getting things 'wrong' is valuable in the long run.>

Then I am much wealthier than I realized.

May-05-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Big Pawn: <𝐓𝐫𝐮𝐭𝐡 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐟 𝐦𝐚𝐲 𝐛𝐞 𝐬𝐮𝐛𝐣𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐜𝐭𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐣𝐮𝐝𝐢𝐜𝐞𝐬 𝐰𝐞 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐞𝐱𝐩𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐝𝐞𝐟𝐞𝐧𝐝.>

lol!

May-05-16  Tomlinsky: <JB: Got it. But once I traded my ratty wooden tennis racket with loose nylon strings with a top player, and used his tournament racket for a little while. He still won every point.>

Sure, but I bet he plays better with a working tool of his trade that he is more comfortable with and performs with him. Moonlight Sonata on a wonky old upright piano doesn't do much for me personally.

May-05-16  Jim Bartle: No question.
May-05-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <Tomlinsky: Anyway, point was there is plenty of stuff outside the US that isn't crap. China will supply as much crap as we want, and we seem to, but they, and wherever, can supply quality as well... but we would have to pay for that.>

They make a lot of quality stuff now. My laptop, my iPhone...I have a really hard time believing we in the U.S. could manufacture anything like them. But I was blown away when I realized my broom was made in China. It's cheaper to build a broom in China and ship it across the ocean? Really?

<The thing with making tons of crap over decades puts you in the position of having the resources and know-how of how to manufacture whatever quality you want... if it is demanded. The 'set-up' was paid for over those decades. If the US thinks it can suddenly start producing better crap than China on the turn of a pin they are deluding themselves. The knowledge learned from getting things 'wrong' is valuable in the long run.>

Yes, Andrew Grove wrote about that, a little more politely, a few years back.

<There's more at stake than exported jobs. With some technologies, both scaling and innovation take place overseas. Such is the case with advanced batteries. It has taken years and many false starts, but finally we are about to witness mass-produced electric cars and trucks. They all rely on lithium-ion batteries. What microprocessors are to computing, batteries are to electric vehicles. Unlike with microprocessors, the U.S. share of lithium-ion battery production is tiny (figure-E).

That's a problem. A new industry needs an effective ecosystem in which technology knowhow accumulates, experience builds on experience, and close relationships develop between supplier and customer. The U.S. lost its lead in batteries 30 years ago when it stopped making consumer electronics devices. Whoever made batteries then gained the exposure and relationships needed to learn to supply batteries for the more demanding laptop PC market, and after that, for the even more demanding automobile market. U.S. companies did not participate in the first phase and consequently were not in the running for all that followed. I doubt they will ever catch up.>

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...

In 2010, when he wrote that story, there were 166,000 computer manufacturing jobs in the U.S. (fewer, he pointed out, than existed when the first PCs were introduced in 1975) compared to about 1.5 million computer manufacturing jobs in Asia. Apple had 25,000 employees in the United States. Foxconn had 250,000 employees in China that manufactured all of Apple's products.

May-05-16  Tomlinsky: <JB: Then I am much wealthier than I realized.>

Aye, maybe we all are but can't agree on a common currency. Or something.

May-05-16  Tomlinsky: <keypusher> Absolutely.
May-05-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  chancho: As sands through the hourglass, so are the days of our lives...

<Now that Donald Trump is the Republican nominee-presumptive, leading GOP elites from Reince Priebus to Mitch McConnell have been flocking to endorse him.

But House Speaker Paul Ryan broke sharply with the trend on Thursday, telling CNN's Jake Tapper that he was not yet "ready" to endorse Trump.

"To be perfectly candid with you Jake, Iím just not ready to do that at this point. Iím not there right now," Ryan said. "I hope to though. And I want to.

But I think what is required is that we unify this party."

Now, this doesn't appear to be a play to steal the nomination from Trump ó because when pushed by Tapper, Ryan said again that he himself would not accept his party's presidential nomination.

Instead, it's a shot across Trump's bow ó an attempt to warn the billionaire that he can't take Republican Party support for granted just yet.

Ryan repeatedly hammered home two things that, in his view, Trump would have to do to unify the party.

First, he kept saying Trump would have to be a conservative nominee.

"I think conservatives want to know, does he share our values and our principles on limited government, the proper role of the executive, adherence to the Constitution?"

Only when those questions are answered, Ryan said, could Trump "bring all wings of the Republican Party together.">

http://www.vox.com/2016/5/5/1160404...

May-05-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <antonin: Being a life master at chess means next to nothing, hate to tell you....>

If <you> were one, you would expect everyone here to genuflect on command.

<....If you had to quit chess to go to gambling, that makes you NOT a winner!>

Who says I 'had to quit'?

'Pears to me this is just another falsehood from the <big liar>.

<....Being an obese <gambler> does not make one a winner, it makes you a loser....>

Had no idea I had climbed into the 'obese' category--this poster's fervid imagination and ability to lie as others breathe are unsurpassed.

<....But this doesn't matter either, as you aren't a real poster on this page anyways. You're just another <jiffy> and even <jim> isn't that bad....>

'Real poster' as defined by you? The day I allow the likes of yourself to define who or what I am would be a sorry one indeed.

<.... Hey, maybe when I take a drive up to Vermont this month I can stop by and say hello. Just keep an eye out of my big black Cadillac....>

I don't have sociopaths as house guests.

May-05-16  ljfyffe: <jbc>So think before you speak...Einstein was a native-born German, in the homeland of baloney, as you should know, lived in Germany for sometime before taking on Swiss citizenship and then finally ttalso American...however, his place of birth does not change...so what's the problem? Calling him German-American, vis a vis the 'American' designation debate that was at hand, was therefore quite appropiate.
Jump to page #    (enter # from 1 to 8142)
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 8142 OF 8142 ·  Later Kibitzing>
NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, totally anonymous, and 100% free--plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, or duplicating posts.
  3. No personal attacks against other members.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No posting personal information of members.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform an administrator.


NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific player and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, you might try the Kibitzer's Café.
Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors.
Spot an error? Please suggest your correction and help us eliminate database mistakes!


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | advertising | contact us
Copyright 2001-2016, Chessgames Services LLC
Web design & database development by 20/20 Technologies