chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

K Rogoff 
Photograph courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.  
Kenneth Rogoff
Number of games in database: 132
Years covered: 1968 to 2012
Last FIDE rating: 2505
Overall record: +38 -29 =64 (53.4%)*
   * Overall winning percentage = (wins+draws/2) / total games
      Based on games in the database; may be incomplete.
      1 exhibition game, odds game, etc. is excluded from this statistic.

MOST PLAYED OPENINGS
With the White pieces:
 English (10) 
    A15 A13 A18 A16 A19
 Sicilian (8) 
    B21 B23 B30 B38 B85
 Ruy Lopez (7) 
    C88 C68 C97 C65 C91
 English, 1 c4 e5 (5) 
    A29 A20 A22
 King's Indian (5) 
    E62 E74 E63 E60
 English, 1 c4 c5 (5) 
    A34 A30 A36
With the Black pieces:
 Sicilian (12) 
    B93 B30 B52 B50 B81
 Caro-Kann (11) 
    B17 B10 B13 B12
 English, 1 c4 c5 (9) 
    A30 A34 A33
 Sicilian Najdorf (5) 
    B93
Repertoire Explorer

NOTABLE GAMES: [what is this?]
   K Rogoff vs R Blumenfeld, 1976 1-0
   Huebner vs K Rogoff, 1972 1/2-1/2
   K Rogoff vs A H Williams, 1969 1/2-1/2
   K Rogoff vs Smejkal, 1976 1-0
   K Rogoff vs Larsen, 1976 1/2-1/2
   K Rogoff vs O Castro, 1976 1-0
   K Rogoff vs Timman, 1971 1-0
   K Rogoff vs Bisguier, 1974 1/2-1/2
   Huebner vs K Rogoff, 1976 1/2-1/2
   A Matanovic vs K Rogoff, 1976 1/2-1/2

NOTABLE TOURNAMENTS: [what is this?]
   US Championship (1974)
   Lone Pine (1978)
   Lone Pine (1976)
   Biel Interzonal (1976)

GAME COLLECTIONS: [what is this?]
   Ken Rogoff Chess Highlights by GumboGambit
   US Championship 1974 by Phony Benoni
   US Championship 1975 by suenteus po 147

Search Sacrifice Explorer for Kenneth Rogoff
Search Google for Kenneth Rogoff
FIDE player card for Kenneth Rogoff


KENNETH ROGOFF
(born Mar-22-1953, 62 years old) United States of America

[what is this?]
Kenneth Saul Rogoff learned chess from his father at age six, but only took up the game in earnest when he received a chess set for his 13th birthday. He was soon recognised as a chess prodigy. By age 14, he was a USCF master and New York State Open Champion, and shortly thereafter became a senior master, the highest US national title. At sixteen Rogoff dropped out of high school to concentrate on chess, and spent the next several years living primarily in Europe and playing in tournaments there. However, at eighteen he made the decision to go to college and pursue a career in economics rather than to become a professional player, although he continued to play and improve for several years afterward.

Rogoff was awarded the IM title in 1974 and the GM title in 1978. He came third in the World Junior Championship of 1971 and finished second in the US Championship of 1975, which doubled as a Zonal competition, one-half point behind Walter Shawn Browne; this result qualified him for the 1976 Interzonal at Biel, where he finished 13-15th. In other tournaments he finished equal first at Norristown 1973 and Orense 1976.

Early in his economics career, Rogoff served as chief economist at the International Monetary Fund and also at the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. He is currently the Thomas D. Cabot Professor of Public Policy and Professor of Economics at Harvard University.

Rogoff's biography in his own words: http://www.economics.harvard.edu/fa...; Rogoff's game against Magnus Carlsen in August 2012 in New York: http://chessbase.com/newsdetail.asp...; Article by Rogoff in Chessbase titled <Rogoff on innovation, unemployment, inequality and dislocation> with particular reference to professional chess: http://chessbase.com/newsdetail.asp...

Wikipedia article: Kenneth Rogoff


 page 1 of 6; games 1-25 of 132  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. Larsen vs K Rogoff ½-½35 1968 Canadian OpenA02 Bird's Opening
2. K Rogoff vs S Spencer 1-020 1969 US Jnr ChpB15 Caro-Kann
3. K Rogoff vs A H Williams ½-½106 1969 World Junior Championship, B FinalA56 Benoni Defense
4. E M Green vs K Rogoff ½-½37 1969 World Junior ChB12 Caro-Kann Defense
5. J Durao vs K Rogoff 0-130 1970 MalagaB93 Sicilian, Najdorf, 6.f4
6. H Pfleger vs K Rogoff  1-059 1970 WchT U26 17thA58 Benko Gambit
7. K Rogoff vs Z Vranesic  0-148 1970 Ontario opB83 Sicilian
8. Karpov vs K Rogoff 1-026 1971 06, Mayaguez tt-studA22 English
9. Ljubojevic vs K Rogoff 1-029 1971 MalagaB50 Sicilian
10. K Rogoff vs L Day ½-½21 1971 World Student OlympiadA15 English
11. K Rogoff vs Timman 1-048 1971 Malaga 11/138B08 Pirc, Classical
12. Ulf Andersson vs K Rogoff 1-036 1971 OlotB93 Sicilian, Najdorf, 6.f4
13. E Paoli vs K Rogoff 1-026 1971 Liberation tournB06 Robatsch
14. V Tukmakov vs K Rogoff  1-042 1971 Liberation tournD93 Grunfeld, with Bf4 & e3
15. J Durao vs K Rogoff  0-165 1971 MalagaB93 Sicilian, Najdorf, 6.f4
16. K Rogoff vs V Tukmakov 1-041 1972 WchT U26 19th fin-AB21 Sicilian, 2.f4 and 2.d4
17. K Rogoff vs Adorjan 1-030 1972 Graz Stu ttB30 Sicilian
18. Huebner vs K Rogoff ½-½12 1972 WchT U26 19th fin-AA15 English
19. L Day vs K Rogoff  ½-½23 1973 CAN-opA07 King's Indian Attack
20. K Rogoff vs Suttles 0-147 1973 Ottawa op-CANB06 Robatsch
21. E Paoli vs K Rogoff 0-139 1973 NorristownB06 Robatsch
22. Pilnik vs K Rogoff  0-156 1973 NorristownB81 Sicilian, Scheveningen, Keres Attack
23. N Weinstein vs K Rogoff  ½-½11 1974 US ChampionshipC42 Petrov Defense
24. K Rogoff vs Reshevsky 0-128 1974 US ChampionshipC68 Ruy Lopez, Exchange
25. K Rogoff vs K Commons  1-042 1974 US ChampionshipD47 Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav
 page 1 of 6; games 1-25 of 132  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2) | Rogoff wins | Rogoff loses  
 

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 7114 OF 7114 ·  Later Kibitzing>
May-22-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  valiant: "net exports" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...
May-22-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Marmot PFL: The US economy is the world's #1 importer and the #2 exporter. Oddly enough (at least to me) our #1 import, oil, is also our #3 export.
May-22-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Karposian: <al wazir: Ten percent *is* a low fraction. The corresponding number for the U.S. is 12%.>

Sorry, <al wazir>, but I'm afraid you've got it all wrong. USA net exports are <negative>, because we import more than we export. See the Wikipedia article that <Valiant> linked to.

May-22-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Check It Out: <Donkey Cult>

He said, <His points are that

-- The U.S. is so big that it's practically a world unto itself. Exports figure into the U.S. economy only in a relatively small way.>

To me that reads as his understanding of Krugman's points, not a direct quote.

May-22-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: <Karposian: Sorry, <al wazir>, but I'm afraid you've got it all wrong. USA net exports are <negative>, because we import more than we export. See the Wikipedia article that <Valiant> linked to.> Krugman doesn't say "net exports," he says simply "exports."

Assuming that that's what he meant, there is no way to compare that with Russia's *net* exports. However, the page <valiant> linked to give two different numbers for Russia's net exports, $198 billion (WTO) and $139 billion (CIA Factbook). If there is that much uncertainty, then it may be pointless to try to make a direct comparison.

However, none of this alters Krugman's point. Exports, imports, and (negative) net exports are a small fraction of the total U.S. economy. Any trade agreement is likely to alter that only fractionally, so we are talking about a small part of a small part.

May-22-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Karposian: <al wazir: Krugman doesn't say "net exports," he says simply "exports.">

OK, but for the record, <I> was talking about Net Exports, where the Russian number is almost 10%, and <you> stated that <The corresponding number for the U.S. is 12%.>, which is dead wrong. USA's Net Exports number is app. -4%.

Just so we are on the same page.

May-22-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Alien Math: China Inc. Is Coming To America

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...

Between 2000 and 2014, Chinese firms spent almost $46 billion on acquisitions and new establishments across America, much of it in the past five years alone. By the end of last year there were 1,583 establishments by Chinese firms across the U.S., according to the report.

The U.S. could receive between $100 billion and $200 billion of investment by 2020, creating between 200,000 and 400,000 jobs, the report found.

May-22-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Marmot PFL: GDP numbers can also vary by a large amount, depending on the measuring system. The USA can be #1 or #2, the U.K. from #5 to #9, and Russia from #6 to #15. Even college football rankings are more uniform than that.

http://knoema.com/nwnfkne/world-gdp...

May-22-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: <Karposian: <I> was talking about Net Exports, where the Russian number is almost 10%, and <you> stated that <The corresponding number for the U.S. is 12%.>, which is dead wrong.> I overlooked the "net." But I stand by my use of "small" (Krugman's "low"). And you're right, big countries don't *necessarily* have small export sectors (think of China), but there's a definite correlation and a plausible explanation for it.
May-22-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Marmot PFL: Western Civilization is nearing the end of the road https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fsa...
May-22-15  devere: "Where's the coverage of heroes who stop mass killings?"

<Heroic citizens stopping someone from killing a large number of people don’t seem to be considered news worthy. Don’t people want to read about a brave soul risking his life by running towards the sound of gunfire while others run away? Yet, such stories never get national news coverage by the national mainstream media.

While accidental gunshots get national coverage, few people have any idea how often concealed handgun permit holders stopping mass killings....>

<Let’s look at some of the recent cases that should have gotten some national attention.

-- New Holland, South Carolina: Earlier this month a man started firing a gun and threatened to shoot into a “crowded fire station parking lot full of children and firefighters.” Fortunately, two volunteer firemen at the scene drew their permitted concealed handguns to stop the attack. They forced the gunman to put down his rifle without them having to fire a shot.

-- Chicago, Illinois: More than three weeks ago, on a Friday night, an Uber driver stopped a man who opened fire into a group of people on a Logan Square busy sidewalk. According to Assistant State’s Attorney Barry Quinn, the Uber driver, who had a permitted concealed handgun, “was acting in self-defense and in the defense of others.”

-- Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: In March, NBC Channel 10 described how “Police say a man likely saved the lives of several people when he shot and killed a gunman inside a West Philadelphia barbershop.” As luck would have it a concealed handgun permit holder was walking by the barbershop when the attack started.

-- Chicago, Illinois: Last year, gang members were angered when a woman removed a cup of liquor that one of the gang members had placed on top of her car. The gang members opened fire on four people who had just left a party. But luckily one of the four was in the military and who had a permitted concealed handgun. That permit holder was able to wound one of the gang members and allow his friends to escape.

-- In Darby, Pennsylvania outside Philadelphia in July 2014, a convicted felon, Richard Plotts, opened fire in a hospital, killing a caseworker. Fortunately, a psychiatrist, Lee Silverman, had his own gun and returned fire, hitting Plotts three times and critically wounding him. After Plotts was killed, he still had 39 bullets on him, bullets that he could have used to shoot many other people....>

<The gun debate would be dramatically different if the national media carried even some of these dramatic stories. Covering these cases would not only give these heroes the recognition they deserve, it would also give potential killers second thoughts before they attack.>

By Dr. John R. Lott Jr.

http://www.foxnews.com/opinion/2015...

May-22-15  devere: "Pending $15 minimum wage forces Seattle pizza shop to close"

http://www.kplctv.com/story/2893548...

May-22-15  HeMateMe: Mexico's experience with gangs is a bit more lethal than what we see in Wacko, Texas:

<http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world...>

May-23-15  Donkey Cult: <al wazir: <Donkey Cult>: What part of <We have a low export share because we’re a big country> do you not understand?>

I understand it. But that's not what you claimed he said. Here's a quote from you:

<-- The U.S. is so big that it's practically a world unto itself. Exports figure into the U.S. economy only in a relatively small way.>

As I stated, export figures are about 12% of GDP numbers, or more than 2 trillion dollars.

I'll repeat that so you get the idea:

<Exports figure into the U.S. economy only in a relatively small way.>

and

<export figures are about 12% of GDP numbers. or more than 2 trillion dollars. >

Maybe you need to go back and read your post to familiarize yourself with what you wrote.

May-23-15  Donkey Cult: < Karposian: <Donkey Cult: Where are these actual figures available? I got mine from the BEA news release for the GDP. I assume this means money actually spent.> Anyway, it may be a good starting point in getting a rough idea of military spending, particularly spending concerning the US foreign wars:

https://www.nationalpriorities.org/...

That site says 92 billion as of Sept '14; BEA gives 700 billion for National Defense in seasonally adjusted annual rates for 2014.

May-23-15  Donkey Cult: <Karposian: USA net exports are <negative>, because we import more than we export. See the Wikipedia article that <Valiant> linked to.>

You must be joking. Just because we import more than we export doesn't mean those exports did't happen.

Yes, in an accounting sense it's negative.

May-23-15  Donkey Cult: <Marmot PFL: The US economy is the world's #1 importer and the #2 exporter. Oddly enough (at least to me) our #1 import, oil, is also our #3 export.>

The US is a big player.

May-23-15  Donkey Cult: < al wazir: Ten percent *is* a low fraction. The corresponding number for the U.S. is 12%.>

Of course it is, but it is a significant portion of our economy.

<Look at the scatter plot in the second Krugman link I posted, and you'll see that 40% to 60% is typical.>

True, but this is irrelevant to the post I was questioning.

May-23-15  Donkey Cult: < Check It Out: <Donkey Cult> He said, <His points are that

-- The U.S. is so big that it's practically a world unto itself. Exports figure into the U.S. economy only in a relatively small way.>

To me that reads as his understanding of Krugman's points, not a direct quote.>

OK, <Check It Out>. When I read that link I saw a post about the wonkish aspects of policy, and nothing about the US economy. Maybe I see your point.

May-23-15  Donkey Cult: <al wazir: Krugman doesn't say "net exports," he says simply "exports.">

You need to pay attention. Going back to the link "Trade and Trust" you'll find Krugman does not use the word exports.

May-23-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Karposian: <Donkey Cult: You must be joking. Just because we import more than we export doesn't mean those exports did't happen.

Yes, in an accounting sense it's negative.>

So, if someone points out that the USA is a big Export country, you consider it irrelevant pointing out that the USA is an even bigger Import country?

You are the one joking, obviously.

May-23-15  Donkey Cult: Jeez, I have a lot to answer here. <al wazir>, <Check It Out>, <Marmot PFL>, and <Karposian> seem to gang up on me.

Here's <al wazir>'s edited original post:

<I read Krugman's column in the NYTimes today:

His points are that

-- Trade is already almost as free as it can get, owing to existing treaties and laws.

-- The U.S. is so big that it's practically a world unto itself. Exports figure into the U.S. economy only in a relatively small way.

-- The TPP is mostly about stronger protection for intellectual property and dispute resolution, not free trade.>

Let's be honest about this, Krugman never mentioned the size of the US nor spoke of exports or how they figure into the US economy.

May-23-15  Donkey Cult: < Karposian:
So, if someone points out that the USA is a big Export country, you consider it irrelevant pointing out that the USA is an even bigger Import country?

You are the one joking, obviously.>

I guess you weren't joking. Anyway, imports are irrelevant to the thread theme of exports, no one asked about imports--I still say 2 trillion plus dollars are important to the GDP, and yes I know we have a deficit. But those 2 trillion dollars still matter.

May-23-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Abdel Irada: <Donkey Cult: Jeez, I have a lot to answer here. <al wazir>, <Check It Out>, <Marmot PFL>, and <Karposian> seem to gang up on me.>

The lines of force in a social network never become so visible as when they converge on us. :-)

May-23-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Abdel Irada: "Exports," "net exports": Why do I feel another round of the Definition Game coming on?

Jump to page #    (enter # from 1 to 7114)
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 7114 OF 7114 ·  Later Kibitzing>
NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, totally anonymous, and 100% free--plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, or duplicating posts.
  3. No personal attacks against other members.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. Don't post personal information of members.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform an administrator.


NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific player and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, you might try the Kibitzer's Café.
Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors.
Spot an error? Please suggest your correction and help us eliminate database mistakes!


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | advertising | contact us
Copyright 2001-2015, Chessgames Services LLC
Web design & database development by 20/20 Technologies