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Louis F Stumpers
Number of games in database: 47
Years covered: 1932 to 1969
Overall record: +13 -27 =7 (35.1%)*
   * Overall winning percentage = (wins+draws/2) / total games
      Based on games in the database; may be incomplete.

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Most played openings
D94 Grunfeld (3 games)
E60 King's Indian Defense (2 games)
B59 Sicilian, Boleslavsky Variation, 7.Nb3 (2 games)

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LOUIS F STUMPERS
(born Aug-30-1911, died Sep-27-2003, 92 years old) Netherlands

[what is this?]

 page 1 of 2; games 1-25 of 47  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. L Stumpers vs J Lehr  1-019 1932 EindhovenD18 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav, Dutch
2. E Sapira vs L Stumpers 0-125 1938 NBSB - FlandersD94 Grunfeld
3. L Stumpers vs E Spanjaard  1-055 1938 Dutch Ch prelimE02 Catalan, Open, 5.Qa4
4. L Stumpers vs S Landau  0-141 1939 NED-ch11D33 Queen's Gambit Declined, Tarrasch
5. H van Steenis vs L Stumpers  1-025 1939 NED-ch11B02 Alekhine's Defense
6. J van den Bosch vs L Stumpers  ½-½58 1939 NED-ch11A48 King's Indian
7. A J van den Hoek vs L Stumpers  1-027 1941 BondswedstrijdenB10 Caro-Kann
8. T van Scheltinga vs L Stumpers 1-035 1942 NED-ch12D94 Grunfeld
9. C B van den Berg vs L Stumpers  1-058 1946 NED-ch prelim ID19 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav, Dutch
10. L Stumpers vs H van Steenis 0-124 1946 NED-ch prelim ID28 Queen's Gambit Accepted, Classical
11. G Fontein vs L Stumpers  ½-½26 1946 NED-ch prelim ID94 Grunfeld
12. L Stumpers vs Cortlever  ½-½50 1946 NED-ch prelim IE60 King's Indian Defense
13. L Stumpers vs J H Marwitz  1-040 1946 NED-ch prelim ID31 Queen's Gambit Declined
14. L Stumpers vs Euwe 0-130 1946 NED-ch prelim IE60 King's Indian Defense
15. W Wolthuis vs L Stumpers  ½-½52 1946 NED-ch prelim IC58 Two Knights
16. L Stumpers vs H van Steenis  0-133 1947 Int BD23 Queen's Gambit Accepted
17. L Stumpers vs Grob 1-060 1947 Int BA55 Old Indian, Main line
18. V Soultanbeieff vs L Stumpers  ½-½46 1947 Int BD96 Grunfeld, Russian Variation
19. Tartakower vs L Stumpers 1-024 1947 Int BD74 Neo-Grunfeld, 6.cd Nxd5, 7.O-O
20. L Stumpers vs A Vinken  0-133 1948 NED-ch14E21 Nimzo-Indian, Three Knights
21. L Stumpers vs C Vlagsma  0-145 1948 NED-ch14C65 Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defense
22. L Stumpers vs T van Scheltinga  1-047 1948 NED-ch14C97 Ruy Lopez, Closed, Chigorin
23. L Stumpers vs H Kramer  0-140 1948 NED-ch14B92 Sicilian, Najdorf, Opocensky Variation
24. J Baay vs L Stumpers  1-040 1948 NED-ch14E37 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
25. L Stumpers vs F Henneberke 1-043 1948 NED-ch14C92 Ruy Lopez, Closed
 page 1 of 2; games 1-25 of 47  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2) | Stumpers wins | Stumpers loses  

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 259 OF 259 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Apr-05-15  tbentley: And flammable means the same as inflammable.
Apr-06-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sneaky: Here's one, kind of:

When a layman says "in general", they mean "most of the time, but there might be a few quirky exceptions." For example, "In general, people have to pay their taxes."

But when a mathematician says "in general", they mean absolutely NO exceptions allowed!

Apr-06-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sneaky: <And flammable means the same as inflammable.>

I heard a story about that, although it could be apocryphal.

The story goes that some time ago the word was simply inflammable, from the verb inflame. But warning labels that read "inflammable" would be misinterpreted by stupid people to mean the opposite of what it really means, and you can imagine how disastrous that could be. So the manufacturers of gasoline and gunpowder started to put "flammable" on their products, even though that wasn't a proper word.

Apr-06-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  kellmano: <sneaky> that is a good one about 'in general'. Similarly, logicians and fictional detectives have different uses of the word 'deduce'.
Apr-06-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sneaky: Googling around, I found that the excellent publication Mental Floss has this article on the topic:

http://mentalfloss.com/article/4983...

It brings up some clever ones that I never thought of.

"Dust" can mean either to cover something in dust, or to remove the dust from it. Likewise for "seed": you can seed your garden with jalapeŮos, but if you make poppers you better seed the jalapeŮos first.

Some of their other entries seem a bit farfetched, but it's a fun read.

Apr-06-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  WannaBe: Best to just cover your behind, with one 'M' and two 'M's

https://josephmallozzi.files.wordpr...

Apr-08-15  ljfyffe: All generalizations are false, including this one.
Apr-09-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Karposian: The only thing I am sure of is that nothing is sure. But how can I be sure of that fact?
Apr-09-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <Karposian> As an anonymous graffiti artist once posted: I used to think I was indecisive, but now I am not so sure.
Apr-10-15  nok: <But when a mathematician says "in general", they mean absolutely NO exceptions allowed!>

A number isn't prime, in general.

Apr-12-15  ljfyffe: Then there be General Motors, and General Mills, and General Grant.
Apr-15-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  OhioChessFan: A recent logic problem goes viral:

<Albert and Bernard just became friends with Cheryl, and they want to know when her birthday is. Cheryl gives them a list of 10 possible dates.

May 15 May 16 May 19

June 17 June 18

July 14 July 16

August 14 August 15 August 17

Cheryl then tells Albert and Bernard separately the month and the day of her birthday respectively.

Albert: I donít know when Cherylís birthday is, but I know that Bernard does not know too.

Bernard: At first I donít know when Cherylís birthday is, but I know now. Albert: Then I also know when Cherylís birthday is.

So when is Cherylís birthday?>

Story here:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/...

Apr-15-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  OhioChessFan: A recent logic problem goes viral:

<Albert and Bernard just became friends with Cheryl, and they want to know when her birthday is. Cheryl gives them a list of 10 possible dates.

May 15 May 16 May 19

June 17 June 18

July 14 July 16

August 14 August 15 August 17

Cheryl then tells Albert and Bernard separately the month and the day of her birthday respectively.

Albert: I donít know when Cherylís birthday is, but I know that Bernard does not know too.

Bernard: At first I donít know when Cherylís birthday is, but I know now.

Albert: Then I also know when Cherylís birthday is.

So when is Cherylís birthday?>

Story here:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/...

Apr-15-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  OhioChessFan: FWIW, I really dislike Bernard's grammatical error of saying "don't" instead of "didn't". I thought there might be a clue in that but it's just sloppy language.
Apr-15-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: <<OhioChessFan: A recent logic problem goes viral>. What's hard about that?

<I really dislike Bernard's grammatical error of saying "don't" instead of "didn't".> The problem originated in Singapore. English is only one of several languages spoken there -- and I'm guessing, not the first language of the problem's poser.

Apr-16-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sneaky: So the dates are:

May 15 May 16 May 19

June 17 June 18

July 14 July 16

August 14 August 15 August 17

The key point to note is that we've got two 14s, 15s, 16s, 17s, but only one 18 and only one 19.

<Cheryl then tells Albert and Bernard separately the month and the day of her birthday respectively.>

So Albert is told a month, and Bernard is told a day of the month.

<Albert: I donít know when Cherylís birthday is, but I know that Bernard does not know too.>

If Bernard was told 18 or 19 he'd know the birthdate. So whatever month Bernard was told, it must not have an 18 or 19 in it. That leaves only July and August.

<Bernard: At first I donít know when Cherylís birthday is, but I know now.>

Because it's July 16th. He was told "16" and the only possible month with a 16 in it is July. (It can't be anything else because then that leap of deduction is not possible.)

<Albert: Then I also know when Cherylís birthday is.>

Obviously, because Albert is capable of logical thinking, just like Bernard.

There is a class of puzzles that revolve around the theme of people learning more about their situation, due to others learning more. It can be very interesting, or border on silly. One of the silly ones (in my opinion) involves three people who put on caps colored white, white, and black; then they start to make declarations about what they know. There's a much more intricate puzzle involving silent monks in a monastery, some of which have a symbol on their forehead that others can observe but not communicate. I feel like they've both been posted on this page, probably by me.

Apr-16-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: I solved it a little differently. 18 and 19 occur only once, so there is no ambiguity about them; if C told B that the date was 18 or 19, he would know the answer right away. June and July are the only months with just two dates; with three there is too much ambiguity for A to be able to say "I also know." So it is either June 17, July 14, or July 16. Try each one in succession; the only one that works is July 16.
Apr-16-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sneaky: Wait a minute, now I've gone and confused myself. Why is it that Albert is so sure that it can't be August 15th or August 17th?
Apr-16-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sneaky: Oh wait, duh... because he was whispered "JULY" and that's why he's so sure it can't be in August. :-P
Apr-16-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: I see a problem with my method. It isn't rigorous. Sneaky's is. I will restate it here for my own satisfaction.

A is able to say "I know that B does not know," because he is sure that the day cannot be 18 or 19. (If it were, B would know the whole answer.) He can deduce this if and only if the month (which he has been told) is neither May nor June. That leaves July and August, with five possible birthdays: July 14, July 16, August 14, August 15, and August 17. All of them are consistent with "I donít know when Cís birthday is, but I know that B does not know too."

B now knows that the month must be either July or August. If the day he had been told were 14, he would not be able to conclude anything, because either July 14 or August 14 would be a possible answer. But if he has been told that the day is 16, he would be able to deduce that the answer is July 16. If he has been told 15, he would be able to deduce that the answer is August 15. If he has been told 17, he would be able deduce that the answer is August 15. Thus there are three possible birthdays that are consistent with his "At first I [didnít] know when Cís birthday is, but I know now."

A knows this. If he had been told that the month was August, he would be unable to decide between August 15 and August 17. But he is able to say "I also know when Cís birthday is." So this means the answer is the one remaining possibility, July 16.

Apr-16-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sneaky: I found the monks-and-monestary puzzle; I did indeed share it years ago, but it wasn't on this forum it was over here: ? (kibitz #99)

I'll repost it here since that's where it really belongs. You can follow the above link to read the analysis, which I believe to be complete.

< There is a monestary which houses a large number of monks, and a Chief Monk. The Chief Monk is the only monk who talks; all the others have taken a vow of silence. The other odd thing about this monestary is that their sect forbids any reflective or shiney objects--mirrors are out of the question.

On a certain day, let's call this "day number zero", the Chief Monk gathers and says "A plague has cursed our monestary. At least one monk has been stricken with a horrible affliction. The proof that you have the affliction is that a dark cross forms visibly on your forehead." This of course is already a problem, since the monks cannot see their own foreheads, and there are no mirrors to be had, and their vow of non-communication prohibits them from asking their neighbor if they have a cross on their forehead!

The Chief Monk continues: "Fortunately, the plague is over and all monks which are unafflicted at this time will not become afflicted. However, as to ones which are afflicted, they must leave. Therefore, if any monk among us concludes that they have the mark on the forehead, they should say nothing, and go about their business normally, until the next morning when they are to pack up their bags and immediately depart the monestary." That was day #0.

On day #10 (the 10th day after the proclimation above) the last of the afflicted monks left the monestary.

Question: How many monks, in total, were afflicted? And how did any of them know to leave? >

Apr-18-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: Correction: <If he has been told 17, he would be able deduce that the answer is August 15> should read <If he has been told 17, he would be able to deduce that the answer is August 17.>
Apr-21-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  PinnedPiece: === Chess in the Popular Media ===

How informed are you?

1. What 70s detective program on TV featured a chessboard-themed opening intro with a knocked-over queen on the board?

Answer for the Impatient: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s1v...

2. Yes or no: Did Perry Mason ever play a chessgame in any episode?

Answer for the Impatient: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qMT...

3. In what movie does a player knock over chess pieces to avoid losing to death?

Answer for the Impatient: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mbg...

4. What really cute modern artist (YGILF) wrote these lyrics:

"...
I lived in your chess game
But you changed the rules everyday"

Answer for the Impatient: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a-Y...

Alt: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0B7...

:) Enjoy all in your spare time.

.

Apr-21-15  diceman: <PinnedPiece: === Chess in the Popular Media ===

How informed are you?

1. What 70s detective program on TV featured a chessboard-themed opening intro>

...don't forget this one:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cjy...

Apr-21-15  ljfyffe: Nor Colombo's "Most Dangerous Game" episode.
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