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Adrian Swayne Hollis
  
Number of games in database: 167
Years covered: 1959 to 2000

Overall record: +52 -59 =56 (47.9%)*
   * Overall winning percentage = (wins+draws/2) / total games in the database.

MOST PLAYED OPENINGS
With the White pieces:
 King's Indian (17) 
    E60 E63 E69 E62 E66
 Nimzo Indian (14) 
    E25 E39 E24 E32 E33
 King's Indian Attack (6) 
    A07
 Queen's Pawn Game (6) 
    A50 D02 A40 E00
 Modern Benoni (5) 
    A67 A57 A56
 Grunfeld (5) 
    D76 D78
With the Black pieces:
 Sicilian (26) 
    B81 B84 B78 B21 B76
 Grunfeld (20) 
    D86 D82 D83 D85 D76
 French Defense (9) 
    C18 C17 C15 C05 C01
 Sicilian Scheveningen (9) 
    B81 B84 B82
 English (8) 
    A16 A15 A11 A13
 Sicilian Dragon (6) 
    B78 B76 B35 B75 B77
Repertoire Explorer

NOTABLE GAMES: [what is this?]
   A Hollis vs F Baumbach, 1973 1-0
   C Hilton vs A Hollis, 1963 0-1
   A Hollis vs B Hammar, 1977 1-0
   A Hollis vs N Littlewood, 1967 1-0

NOTABLE TOURNAMENTS: [what is this?]
   Haifa Olympiad (Women) (1976)

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ADRIAN SWAYNE HOLLIS
(born Aug-02-1940, died Feb-26-2013, 72 years old) United Kingdom

[what is this?]
Adrian Swayne Hollis was born in 1940 in Bristol, England. He was a distinguished classical scholar and an English correspondence chess grandmaster (title awarded in 1976). He was British Correspondence Chess Champion in 1966 (jointly), 1967, and 1971. In 1982-87 he won the Ninth Correspondence Chess Olympiad, and in 1998 the World Postal Chess Championship as a member of the British team.

During his distinguished academic career his research focused mainly on Hellenistic and Roman poetry.(1)

(1) Wikipedia article: Adrian Hollis


 page 1 of 7; games 1-25 of 167  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. A Hollis vs P A Mothersill  1-04619597th Stevenson MemorialE39 Nimzo-Indian, Classical, Pirc Variation
2. J Durao vs A Hollis  1-02719597th Stevenson MemorialC18 French, Winawer
3. A Hollis vs D E Lloyd  ½-½3919597th Stevenson MemorialA93 Dutch, Stonewall, Botvinnik Variation
4. O M Hindle vs A Hollis  ½-½1019597th Stevenson MemorialC17 French, Winawer, Advance
5. A Hollis vs E Gereben  0-14519597th Stevenson MemorialE62 King's Indian, Fianchetto
6. W C Evans vs A Hollis  0-14719597th Stevenson MemorialA45 Queen's Pawn Game
7. A Hollis vs H Courtney  1-03419597th Stevenson MemorialD18 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav, Dutch
8. E Pritchard vs A Hollis 1-02219597th Stevenson MemorialC01 French, Exchange
9. A Hollis vs H Liebert  ½-½281960WchT U26 07thA82 Dutch, Staunton Gambit
10. J van Oosterom vs A Hollis  1-0401960WchT U26 07thA16 English
11. A Hollis vs Szabo 1-0641960WchT U26 07thE33 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
12. J Trmal vs A Hollis  ½-½681960WchT U26 07thD90 Grunfeld
13. A Hollis vs Klovans  0-1251960WchT U26 07thD28 Queen's Gambit Accepted, Classical
14. T Perman vs A Hollis  0-1621960WchT U26 07thB43 Sicilian, Kan, 5.Nc3
15. M Knezevic vs A Hollis 1-0411960WchT U26 07thB21 Sicilian, 2.f4 and 2.d4
16. P Dozsa vs A Hollis  0-1391961WchT U26 08thA07 King's Indian Attack
17. A Hollis vs T Tsagan  1-0411961WchT U26 08thE32 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
18. L Zinn vs A Hollis  1-0491961WchT U26 08thC05 French, Tarrasch
19. A Hollis vs Popov  ½-½481961WchT U26 08thE69 King's Indian, Fianchetto, Classical Main line
20. J Westman vs A Hollis  0-1211961WchT U26 08thC18 French, Winawer
21. A Hollis vs Lombardy  0-1421961WchT U26 08thE69 King's Indian, Fianchetto, Classical Main line
22. H Djait vs A Hollis  1-0621961WchT U26 08thC18 French, Winawer
23. A Hollis vs H Westerinen  ½-½481961WchT U26 08thE62 King's Indian, Fianchetto
24. O Jakobsen vs A Hollis  1-0521961WchT U26 08thE67 King's Indian, Fianchetto
25. A Hollis vs Bagirov  ½-½291961WchT U26 08thA07 King's Indian Attack
 page 1 of 7; games 1-25 of 167  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2) | Hollis wins | Hollis loses  

Kibitzer's Corner
Jan-03-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  Benzol: Adrian Swayne Hollis
Born 2nd August 1940 in Bristol
Awarded the CIM title in 1970 and CGM title in 1976.
He was also British Correspondence champion in 1966 (joint), 1967 and 1971.
Jun-08-05  Mac3: Son of Sir Roger Hollis, former Director of MI5, who was allegedly a spy according to Peter Wright former Assistant Director of MI5 in his autobiography "Spy Catcher".
Aug-02-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  WannaBe: Yo! Adrian!!! =)
Aug-02-06  mahmoudkubba: <Mac3>: ur talk remindsme of Agatha Cresty story,'I was a spy' or something,been written in the 20th century.
Aug-02-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Player of the Day:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adrian...
and his father: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_...
Aug-02-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: argh... i missed the <Adrian Hollis Retirement Dinner> on Saturday 28 July 2007 at 7:15 pm ;)
Aug-02-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: From the Potter Memorial tournament book, written by K Messere

<Adrian Hollis is 36, was educated at Etom and Oxford, has written two books on the poet Ovid and is a Fellow and Tutor in Classics at Keble College, Oxford. He is a British Master at over the board chess and has been Champion of British Universities, West of England and East Scotland. In 1964, he went to teach at St. Andrews University where his wife, Margret, taught German. They were married and moved to Keble College in 1967 and now have two daughters. Jennifer is nearly five and Veronica is two. Adrian began to concentrate on correspondence chess in 1964 and won the British Correspondence Chess Championship jointly in 1966 and outright in 1967 and 1971. He won the I.M. title in 1970 and his fine score of 6/9 on top board for Great Britain in the I.C.C.F. VIIth Correspondence Chess Olypiad Final contributed to the team's winning the bronze medal in this event.>

Jan-19-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: The wikipedia article for Adrian's father Roger says he was a "chess player of international reputation, eventually earning the title of correspondence chess Grandmaster" so I am surprised there are no games at all here for him.
Jan-19-12  Tired Tim: #Offramp - I don't think there is any suggestion that Roger H was a strong player ... the wiki article refers only to Adrian in that context
Jan-19-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: Blimey MacRiley - you are correct sir!
Mar-12-13  Nosnibor: I understand that he passed away on the 26th February.
Mar-22-13  James D Flynn: I believe I lost to Adrian Hollis in the last round of the London boys championship in 1958( or maybe 59). We were joint leaders so he took the title. I no longer have that game, if anyone knows how to find games from that tournament please let me know.
Apr-25-13  ketchuplover: <JDF> Are you in?
Apr-25-13  FSR: This guy has a 6-6-6 name, just like Ronald Wilson Reagan, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, and Hannah Taylor-Gordon.
Apr-26-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Dionysius1: Is that a good thing, bad thing?
Apr-26-13  FSR: <Dionysius1> It's supposed to be a <really bad> thing. See, e.g., http://www.666markofthebeast.org/
Apr-26-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Dionysius1: Oah! Never ocurred to me. Thanks <FSR>
Jul-25-13  James D Flynn: ketuplover: On Apr-25-13 you posted <JDF> Are you in? Appently in reply to my post "I believe I lost to Adrian Hollis in the last round of the London boys championship in 1958( or maybe 59). We were joint leaders so he took the title. I no longer have that game, if anyone knows how to find games from that tournament please let me know." Does that mean you know where I can find the games for the London boys championship of 1958 or 59?"
Dec-29-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  wordfunph: "It has been said that a chess player with an adjourned game is the most unsociable person on earth."

- GMC Adrian Swayne Hollis

rest in peace..

Aug-02-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: R.I.P. GM Adrian Swayne Hollis.
Sep-23-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: For someone whose father may have been the greatest traitor in the history of British intelligence, I'm wondering if Hollis's correspondence beyond the Iron Curtain was routinely subject to further analysis.
Sep-23-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  OhioChessFan: I read Peter Wright's book maybe a year ago. Is there a consenus on his claim?
Dec-03-14  ljfyffe: Member of VII Olympiad CC 3rd placed team,
VIII, 3rd placed, IX 1st placed, X 2nd placed, XI
8th equal placed.
Feb-06-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <FSR: <Dionysius1> It's supposed to be a <really bad> thing....>

In Reagan's case it was, mais certainement.

Apr-27-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: < Is there a consenus on his claim?>

In a word, no.

<On one occasion de Mowbray heard that Mitchell, an ardent chess fan, was attending a tournament in Eastbourne in which Russians were taking part. De Mowbray commandeered an MI6 colleague with a fast sports car to whisk him down to the tournament, but without any results.

Another time, de Mowbray was following Mitchell through a rush-hour crowd in London when the MI5 officer stopped, turned and looked straight at him. Mitchell said nothing, but stared into de Mowbray’s face for several seconds before turning on his heels and walking away. He knew he was being watched.

In one of the most bizarre episodes in the history of British intelligence, three female employees of MI6 took shifts spying through a peephole drilled through Mitchell’s office wall. A secret camera recorded the changes in his body language, his eyes sinking into black hollows as he spiralled into depression as a result of his awareness that he was under suspicion.

Mitchell took early retirement, but even after his departure he was kept under surveillance, although de Mowbray and Wright remained convinced that Hollis was the real Soviet mole.

Fuelling the suspicions over Hollis was the fact that he had spent part of the 1930s in China, as a representative of British American Tobacco, associating with a number of communists, including the Soviet spies Richard Sorge and Agnes Smedley, before heading MI5’s anti-Soviet section during a period when the Cambridge Spy Ring were all active.

Eventually the CIA were told that Hollis had been cleared, so de Mowbray appealed first to Sir John Rennie, who took over as chief of MI6 in 1968. When Rennie declined to do anything, de Mowbray tried to speak to the prime minister Harold Wilson.

He did not get to speak to Wilson but had an interview with Sir John Hunt, the Cabinet Secretary, who initially thought he was mad. Hunt contacted Sir Dick White, now retired, and asked him if de Mowbray was “a screwball”.

White replied that de Mowbray was “patriotic, hardworking and obsessed”. White also refused to rule out that Hollis was the mole. Hunt asked his predecessor, Lord Trend, to carry out an inquiry. Trend spoke to de Mowbray, warning him that he was not going “to tear Whitehall apart about all this”.

Trend’s findings remain classified but its conclusion was ultimately that there was not enough evidence either to clear or condemn Hollis. De Mowbray eventually resigned, furious that no one seemed prepared to do anything about hostile penetration of MI5.

[...]

When Professor Christopher Andrew published the authorised history of MI5 in 2009, in which he dismissed de Mowbray as one of a trio, with Martin and Wright, of conspiracy theorists with “paranoid tendencies”, de Mowbray felt compelled to speak out, having not breathed a word in public about it for 30 years.

He told Gordon Corera (author of The Art of Betrayal: The Secret History of MI6, 2012) that when he left MI6 no one seemed willing to countenance the idea of further Soviet penetration of the top of the Security Service. But he remained convinced that he was right.>

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/obituar...

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