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I Krush 
Photo courtesy of "WannaBe"  
Irina Krush
Number of games in database: 711
Years covered: 1996 to 2014
Last FIDE rating: 2490
Highest rating achieved in database: 2502
Overall record: +254 -184 =223 (55.3%)*
   * Overall winning percentage = (wins+draws/2) / total games
      Based on games in the database; may be incomplete.
      50 exhibition games, odds games, etc. are excluded from this statistic.

MOST PLAYED OPENINGS
With the White pieces:
 Nimzo Indian (84) 
    E32 E39 E34 E38 E44
 King's Indian (35) 
    E94 E73 E99 E92 E90
 Slav (35) 
    D15 D11 D10 D12 D17
 Queen's Gambit Declined (26) 
    D31 D35 D36 D30 D37
 Queen's Pawn Game (24) 
    A41 A46 E00 A40 D05
 Grunfeld (18) 
    D85 D87 D70 D86 D97
With the Black pieces:
 Sicilian (140) 
    B63 B28 B52 B23 B22
 Queen's Gambit Accepted (43) 
    D27 D20 D23 D26 D25
 Sicilian Richter-Rauser (31) 
    B63 B67 B62 B60 B65
 Queen's Pawn Game (30) 
    A40 D02 A45 E00 D00
 King's Indian (19) 
    E60 E98 E90 E97 E92
 Slav (16) 
    D11 D10 D15 D17 D16
Repertoire Explorer

NOTABLE GAMES: [what is this?]
   Korchnoi vs I Krush, 2007 0-1
   I Krush vs K B Richardson, 2007 1-0
   O Zambrana vs I Krush, 2003 0-1
   I Krush vs Nakamura, 2001 1-0
   I Krush vs Akopian, 2007 1-0
   I Krush vs Lenderman, 2010 1-0
   I Krush vs Shabalov, 2007 1-0
   I Krush vs Kosteniuk, 2008 1-0
   I Krush vs E Vicary, 2007 1-0
   I Krush vs Kaidanov, 2010 1-0

NOTABLE TOURNAMENTS: [what is this?]
   37th Chess Olympiad: Women (2006)
   2008 Women's Olympiad (2008)
   Corus (Group C) (2008)
   US Women's Championship (2008)
   Gibtelecom (2009)
   Canadian Open (2009)
   Chess Olympiad (Women) (2010)
   USA Women Championship (2010)
   US Championship (Women) (2011)
   Chess Olympiad (Women) (2012)
   US Championship (Women) (2012)
   US Chess Championships (Women) (2013)

GAME COLLECTIONS: [what is this?]
   Krush! by larrewl

Search Sacrifice Explorer for Irina Krush
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FIDE player card for Irina Krush


IRINA KRUSH
(born Dec-24-1983) Ukraine (citizen of United States of America)
PRONUNCIATION:
[what is this?]
WGM; IM (2000); Grandmaster (2013); 5-time US women's champion (1998, 2007, 2010, 2012 & 2013).

Irina Krush ((Russian: Ирина Круш) was born in Odessa, Ukraine. She learned chess in 1989, the same year she and her family moved to Brooklyn in the United States. At age 12 she became a master and won the International Master title in 2000.

Championships

In 1998 she won the U.S. Women's Championship, becoming the youngest-ever holder of that title. The following year she tied for first place in the female section of the World Junior Championship. In 2007 she reclaimed the title of U.S. Women's Champion, and repeated that feat in 2010, 2012 and 2013.

Krush has competed in a number of Women's World Championship events. In 2000, 2004 and 2006, she played in the Women's World Championship Knockout matches, making it to round two on all three occasions. She qualified for the 2008 event but was unable to participate. In the FIDE Knock-Out Women's World Championship (2012), and beat Singapore IM Li Ruofan and Swedish GM Pia Cramling in the early rounds before bowing out in the tiebreaker to the third round to WGM Huang Qian.

Standard Tournaments

Krush earned her first GM norm in 2001 by tying for first place at the Mayor's Cup International Tournament in New York City. She won her 2nd GM norm at the Women's World Team Championship (2013) and her 3rd GM norm (and requisite 2500 rating) at the Baku Open (2013).

Match

In 1998, she lost a short match to John Fedorowicz by 1.5-2.5 (+0 -1 =3).

Team Events

<Olympiads> Krush played for the US team in 1998, and from 2002 to 2012 inclusive, playing either first or second board. She was second board for the silver-medal-winning US team at the 36th Olympiad, Women (2004) and board one for the bronze medal winning team at the Women's Olympiad (2008).

<World Team Championships> Krush played for the USA in the Yinzhou Cup Women World Teams (2009) and the Women's World Team Championship in 2013 (see above). Playing board 2 in the latter, she scored a silver and a gold medal, and won her 3rd GM norm, for her efforts on board two.

<National Leagues> Krush plays for the New York Knights in the U.S. Chess League and has played for Guildford ADC in the 4NCL.

Kasparov vs The World

Krush was part of the consultation team that included Etienne Bacrot, Elisabeth Paehtz and Florin Felecanin that made recommendations to the public in the Kasparov vs The World, 1999 game played over the internet. Garry Kasparov played the white pieces and The World, via the internet, voted on moves for the black pieces, guided by the recommendations of Krush and the others.

Other

Pascal Charbonneau is her ex-husband.

Wikipedia article: Irina Krush; USCF bio: http://www.uschesschamps.com/2013-u...


 page 1 of 29; games 1-25 of 711  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. I Krush vs M Fierro  0-136 1996 New York OpenE92 King's Indian
2. I Krush vs Wang Yu 0-136 1996 Wch U14 GirlsA56 Benoni Defense
3. Y Dembo vs I Krush 1-030 1996 Wch U14 Disney GirlsB89 Sicilian
4. I Krush vs G Leite  1-031 1996 New York OpenE32 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
5. I Krush vs L Khusnutdinova  1-033 1997 Wch U14 GirlsD36 Queen's Gambit Declined, Exchange, Positional line, 6.Qc2
6. Nakamura vs I Krush 1-062 1998 Cardoza US opB67 Sicilian, Richter-Rauzer Attack, 7...a6 Defense, 8...Bd7
7. Sherzer vs I Krush  1-043 1998 World opB56 Sicilian
8. I Krush vs Browne  1-038 1999 Koltanowski Team MatchE42 Nimzo-Indian, 4.e3 c5, 5.Ne2 (Rubinstein)
9. I Krush vs D Zilberstein  1-044 1999 Ch USA (juniors), San Francisco (USA)D35 Queen's Gambit Declined
10. E Perelshteyn vs I Krush  1-024 1999 Ch USA (juniors), San Francisco (USA)B08 Pirc, Classical
11. I Krush vs A Schenk  1-058 1999 WCh U18 BoysE34 Nimzo-Indian, Classical, Noa Variation
12. I Krush vs Browne  0-130 1999 Browne - Krush matchE30 Nimzo-Indian, Leningrad
13. J Shahade vs I Krush 1-070 1999 Ch USA (juniors), San Francisco (USA)B62 Sicilian, Richter-Rauzer
14. I Krush vs Barsov  1-044 1999 Hampstead GM 5thE39 Nimzo-Indian, Classical, Pirc Variation
15. I Krush vs Zaremba  1-041 1999 Ch USA (juniors), San Francisco (USA)D45 Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav
16. Browne vs I Krush 1-047 1999 Browne - Krush matchD20 Queen's Gambit Accepted
17. I Krush vs G Braylovsky  1-052 1999 Ch USA (juniors), San Francisco (USA)A15 English
18. Dzindzichashvili vs I Krush  ½-½55 1999 Koltanowski Team MatchA06 Reti Opening
19. I Krush vs M Martinez  ½-½63 1999 Ch USA (juniors), San Francisco (USA)E10 Queen's Pawn Game
20. I Krush vs Browne  ½-½74 1999 Browne - Krush matchE42 Nimzo-Indian, 4.e3 c5, 5.Ne2 (Rubinstein)
21. V Bhat vs I Krush 1-051 1999 Ch USA (juniors), San Francisco (USA)B23 Sicilian, Closed
22. I Krush vs DeFirmian  ½-½29 1999 Koltanowski Team MatchE59 Nimzo-Indian, 4.e3, Main line
23. H Akopyan vs I Krush  0-140 1999 Ch USA (juniors), San Francisco (USA)B51 Sicilian, Canal-Sokolsky (Rossolimo) Attack
24. Browne vs I Krush  1-045 1999 Browne - Krush matchD20 Queen's Gambit Accepted
25. I Krush vs D Schneider  1-065 1999 Ch USA (juniors), San Francisco (USA)D34 Queen's Gambit Declined, Tarrasch
 page 1 of 29; games 1-25 of 711  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2) | Krush wins | Krush loses  
 

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 8 OF 26 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jun-03-08  Vollmer: Oh flip , hadn't thought of that angle , whiskeyrebel . You are correct .
Jun-03-08  whiskeyrebel: If I wind up in a time scramble at the National open next week and some clown inspired by this situation decides to use dirty clock tactics, I'm gonna EXPLODE, raining blood and guts and bone matter all over the convention hall.
Jun-03-08  Kaspablanca: I have a simple but a very important question; did Irina agree for the armagedon format in case of a tie to determine the championship? If she ageed then all these arguments are simple excuses of a sore loser.
Jun-03-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  notyetagm: My two cents: Krush was cheated out of the title by her opponent's illegal behavior.
Jun-03-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  notyetagm: <whiskeyrebel: If I wind up in a time scramble at the National open next week and some clown inspired by this situation decides to use dirty clock tactics, I'm gonna EXPLODE, raining blood and guts and bone matter all over the convention hall.>

I could not agree with you more.

I would call the TD over and -DEMAND- that he enforce the blitz rule that my opponent cannot move a piece until I have hit the clock.

How is it possible that Krush's opponent could make 20 moves with 2 seconds on her clock (no bonus!) if she had to wait for Krush to hit the clock before she moved, which is the legal requirement?

Jun-03-08  whiskeyrebel: Kaspablanca, if my wife takes the wedding vows ( "for better or for worse") does that mean she's not justified in complaining at my later behavior? If a professional baseball player signs a contract to play the game and is drilled in the head intentionally by a pitch, is it just sour grapes if he complains?
Jun-03-08  dx9293: <notyetagm> The USCF rules are ambiguous as to the legality (or illegality) of starting your move before the opponent has completed their move (pressed the clock). I'm an experienced TD, and I've never really had this come up.

I'm not an IA or FA, but in the USCF, TDs are to be WITNESSES ONLY, until a player asks a question or makes a claim. We do not intervene in games without being asked to do so (some TDs might intevene in Kindergarten events or some such, but I do not).

From my standpoint, Krush doesn't have a leg to stand on because she did not make a claim of any kind during the game. Personally, I think that if she protested immediately AFTER the game, she doesn't have a leg to stand on. The only way would be for her to make a claim and have the TD rule against her, then continue to play "under protest" and file an appeal after the game. None of that happened.

Anna Zatonskih is the 2008 US Women's Champion, fair and square. I like Irina personally, but I wonder how many people are blinded by the aura the USCF tries so hard to create for her.

Jun-03-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  ganstaman: <notyetagm: My two cents: Krush was cheated out of the title by her opponent's illegal behavior.>

<notyetagm: How is it possible that Krush's opponent could make 20 moves with 2 seconds on her clock (no bonus!) if she had to wait for Krush to hit the clock before she moved, which is the legal requirement?>

It seems that that is not the requirement, based on every official-ish opinion I've read. You simply can not complete your move (ie hit your clock) until your opponent has done so.

Also, I've read that Irina knocked over a rook and didn't pick it up, which was illegal. So then, here's the situation:

1) Irina clearly did something illegal.

2) Anna did something that seems possibly illegal, but experienced TDs think probably isn't.

Really, I hate this sort of tie-break, but in this situation, it seems like a rather clear-cut case.

Jun-03-08  Kaspablanca: whiskeyrebel; dont mix up the things. we are talking about the argamegon format. Many things have to be cleared. Did Ana violate the rules by making her moves before Irina punched the clock? If yes then BOTH PLAYERS violate the rules, did you see the video? Read the USCF response and you can see that is not illegal to move before your opponent hit the clock, what is clearly illegal is to knock over a piece and not to put it again in the board and if we continue and can see that the real cheater is miss krush.
Jun-03-08  Kaspablanca: And do you really think that Ana only had 2 seconds left and Irina 20??
Jun-03-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  SetNoEscapeOn: There is an incredibly accurate response to Irina's letter on uschess.org posted by Tom Braunlich that should put the matter to rest:

http://main.uschess.org/content/vie...

The key for me is this:

"The bottom line for IA Frank Berry and Jim Berry, who were the directors present, is that no protest of the outcome was made at the time when something might have been done about it. Instead the protest came many days later."

End of discussion.

Jun-03-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  SetNoEscapeOn: Haha, well, I see that I was late in spotting the letter, but then I wonder how there can still be any debate on the topic as it relates to the result of the event.
Jun-04-08  Augalv: <notyetagm: My two cents: Krush was cheated out of the title by her opponent's illegal behavior.>

I completely agree notyetgm.

<Kaspablanca: I have a simple but a very important question; did Irina agree for the armagedon format in case of a tie to determine the championship? If she ageed then all these arguments are simple excuses of a sore loser.>

That's not in question. Irina agreed to the armagedon format. What I think she didn't agree to is to play an opponnent who would resort to dirty clock tactics to win the title.

Jun-04-08  Augalv: Venue and details of Women's World Championship

At the recent FIDE Presidential Board meeting in Athens, besides settling the venue for the Kamsky - Topalov match, the board also announced Nalchik, Russia as the venue for the Women's World Championship, to be held between 28th August and 18th September 2008.

Nalchik was apparently also chosen as the second cleanest city in Russia in 2003 according to Wikipedia! How it fared in 2008 is not disclosed...

The format will be a 64 player KO event, with each round consisting of 2 games between the players, except the final which will be played over 4 games.

The time control for games is 40 moves in 90 minutes, with an extra 15 minutes to complete the game after that, with a 30 second bonus per move applying from the start of the game.

Tiebreaks will consist of 2 rapid games (4 in the final) at a rate of 25 minutes/game plus a 10 second increment. If scores are still level then there will be 2 blitz games played at 5 minutes/game plus a 10 second increment. <If - heaven forbid - scores are still level then it's Armageddon time; White has 6 minutes, Black has 5 minutes, there is no increment and White has to win or else Black is declared the winner.>

The qualifiers for the event are listed below (including Yelena Dembo). Note that just because a player has qualified, doesn't mean they will definitely be playing e.g. Judit Polgar is no more likely to be playing in the event than I am!

<If Irina Krush takes part, let's hope that she doesn't have to take part in an Armageddon playoff!>

Source: http://www.chess.com/news/venue-and...

Jun-04-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  SetNoEscapeOn: <Augalv>

<That's not in question. Irina agreed to the armagedon format. What I think she didn't agree to is to play an opponnent who would resort to dirty clock tactics to win the title.>

At least recognize that Irina made illegal actions in the game, when she knocked the rook off of the board and did not replace it.

It can't really be any clearer than what ganstaman posted:

<1) Irina clearly did something illegal.

2) Anna did something that seems possibly illegal, but experienced TDs think probably isn't. (and one of the best international arbiters recently wrote isn't- SetNoEscapeOn).>

Jump directly to page #

Jun-04-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  SetNoEscapeOn: In summary:

1. Irina did not make her protest in time.

2. Irina's protest is invalid, making 1 a moot issue.

3. Anna had a valid claim that she could have made, but did not.

Jun-04-08  utssb: <Irina did not make her protest in time.>

That's incorrect. You're merely assuming a rule exists which does not. There is no time limit outlined in which complaints can be made. Krush had just finished a 6 hour, 106 move game, a series of blitz games and then an Armageddon game. And even more she had just lost her title by ridiculous means. You expect her to come right back and submit a formal complaint which would probably just be ignored by some ignorant TD anyway? Besides, this entire notion that a player must complain in order for a TD to take action is nonsense. Their entire function is to step in during such cases and make a decision. But instead they take the easier route and watch quietly. If players were to give complaints in the way outlined by Braunlich then TDs would be completely unnecessary.

Jun-04-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <Really, I hate this sort of tie-break, but in this situation, it seems like a rather clear-cut case.>

That seems to sum it up. But why does there have to be a tie-break at all (rapid games included)? Why couldn't there just be co-champions? In the Huebner-Smyslov match <WannaBe> alludes to, there had to be a winner, because only one player could go to the next round of the Candidates' matches. But that consideration doesn't apply here.

Jun-04-08  Akavall: <utssb> But perhaps TD didn't see the need to step in.

< USCF Rules Mike Atkins, one of America's most experienced tournament directors, supported this same interpretation with regard to USCF rules in his posting on the CLO forum after he viewed the video:

"I have directed hundreds of blitz tournaments over the past 15 years and helped write the new USCF Blitz rules that are a modification of the old WBCA rules. After watching the video several times, there was nothing illegal except for the piece being knocked over and not replaced. I clearly saw Anna making moves while Irina was moving and you can see Irina doing the same thing. This is not illegal. Both players were moving extremely fast. Top blitz players have to do this to survive. If they wait politely until the opponent has moved and punched their clock before moving, they will lose every time. Anyone ever see Hikaru [Nakamura] or Jorge Sammour-Hasbun play blitz? I've seen MUCH MUCH worse at major tournaments, with players moving so fast I couldn't keep up with them - I wish EVERY blitz game had a video as it clears up all arguments.>

http://main.uschess.org/content/vie...

It is quite possible that TD at the event had the same views.

Jun-04-08  utssb: <After watching the video several times, there was nothing illegal except for the piece being knocked over and not replaced.>

It's funny how often these people reference that, as if it's such a strong argument. Had Zatonskih waited for Krush to hit the clock the Rook definitely wouldn't have fallen. Her hands were so much in the way that I'm impressed Krush was even able to make a move.

<I clearly saw Anna making moves while Irina was moving and you can see Irina doing the same thing.>

This, of course, is a flawed statement. Krush only began moving at such speed after Zatonskih began moving within her time. And even then Krush didn't nearly go as far. For if she infringed equally on Zatonskih's time she would have easily won. Seeing as that she had a large time advantage.

<Top blitz players have to do this to survive. If they wait politely until the opponent has moved and punched their clock before moving, they will lose every time.>

Complete nonsense. 'Top blitz players' would never allow their clock to reach 2 seconds versus 10 or 8. Referencing Nakamura is ridiculous because he is usually up on time, not way down. And I guarantee that if he lost the U.S. title in this way he would be furious.

<I've seen MUCH MUCH worse at major tournaments>

That's the razor-sharp sense of justice you can expect from an American TD. If a worse crime has been committed then the lesser crime should be ignored. How logical.

Jun-04-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Wild Bill: I'm not going to take sides in the dispute, but it would have helped Ms. Krush if she had used her left hand for the clock rather than reaching across herself with her right hand.
Jun-04-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <Wild Bill: I'm not going to take sides in the dispute, but it would have helped Ms. Krush if she had used her left hand for the clock rather than reaching across herself with her right hand.>

I have heard that using a different hand to move the pieces than to punch the clock is illegal, or at least questionable.

By the way, is the clock supposed to be to the left of the player with White? Is there a rule about that, either in regular chess or blitz?

Jun-04-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  SetNoEscapeOn: <utssb>

<That's incorrect. You're merely assuming a rule exists which does not. There is no time limit outlined in which complaints can be made.>

If no rule indeed exists for this (I have my doubts as to the validity of this statement given your lack of familiarity with the rules), then it is only because it is so obvious that a protest should be made during or at the worst immediately after a contest that they felt it would be folly to include it. I don't feel as if I need to explain why this is the case.

<Their entire function is to step in during such cases and make a decision. But instead they take the easier route and watch quietly>

A complete falsehood. The exact opposite is true; read Tom's letter. He clearly cites the relevant sections of the uscf rulebook, and it is clear that the TD's decision not to intervene in this case is correct. The specific circumstances surrounding this "incident" are directly addressed in the rule book...

<You expect her to come right back and submit a formal complaint which would probably just be ignored by some ignorant TD anyway?>

Actually, I don't really expect any coming back. I don't expect anything actually. I'm just saying she should have made the protest during the game. Read Tom's letter.

Also, what makes the TD's ignorant? That they know the rules? Please show us where they ignorantly violated the rules in this instance.

<It's funny how often these people reference that, as if it's such a strong argument.>

Well, if the rules that actually exist in the rule book are the ones that should be enforced, then it is a very strong argument. It's not a difficult rule to understand. If you drop a piece, you need to pick it up.

If they are to based on such speculative nonsense as

<Had Zatonskih waited for Krush to hit the clock the Rook definitely wouldn't have fallen. Her hands were so much in the way that I'm impressed Krush was even able to make a move.>

then in that case only, I agree that it would be a weak argument.

In either case, it doesn't matter since Anna did not protest the misplaced rook during the game.

<This, of course, is a flawed statement. Krush only began moving at such speed after Zatonskih began moving within her time. And even then Krush didn't nearly go as far. For if she infringed equally on Zatonskih's time she would have easily won. Seeing as that she had a large time advantage.>

All irrelevant since it is not illegal to make a move before your opponent has hit the clock; read Tom's letter...

Jun-04-08  utssb: <I have heard that using a different hand to move the pieces than to punch the clock is illegal, or at least questionable.>

It's definitely illegal in standard time controls. I'm not sure if that applies to blitz as well, but I would assume so. Krush would of course understand that moving and hitting the clock with separate hands would be faster, so it had to be a matter of legality.

<By the way, is the clock supposed to be to the left of the player with White? Is there a rule about that, either in regular chess or blitz?>

The clock is meant to be on the left side of White in both time controls.

Jun-04-08  Ed Trice: I say let Gothic Chess be the tiebraker.

:)

http://www.gothicchess.com/animated...

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