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Zvulon Gofshtein
  
Number of games in database: 260
Years covered: 1969 to 2012
Last FIDE rating: 2493 (2463 rapid, 2458 blitz)
Highest rating achieved in database: 2560

Overall record: +102 -61 =87 (58.2%)*
   * Overall winning percentage = (wins+draws/2) / total games in the database. 10 exhibition games, blitz/rapid, odds games, etc. are excluded from this statistic.

MOST PLAYED OPENINGS
With the White pieces:
 Sicilian (16) 
    B63 B43 B48 B81 B90
 King's Indian (12) 
    E92 E60 E77 E97 E81
 Queen's Gambit Declined (11) 
    D38 D31 D37 D06 D39
 English (11) 
    A15 A10 A17 A14 A16
 French Defense (9) 
    C11 C10 C16 C00 C07
 Queen's Pawn Game (8) 
    A41 A40 A46 E00 E10
With the Black pieces:
 Sicilian (27) 
    B42 B40 B85 B32 B48
 Queen's Pawn Game (15) 
    A46 E00 A41 A45 A50
 Robatsch (11) 
    B06
 Sicilian Kan (9) 
    B42 B43 B41
 Pirc (7) 
    B07 B09
 King's Indian (6) 
    E94 E92 E90 E71
Repertoire Explorer

NOTABLE GAMES: [what is this?]
   Z Gofshtein vs M Gurevich, 2001 1-0
   Z Gofshtein vs A G Ashton, 2006 1-0
   Z Gofshtein vs M D Tseitlin, 1991 1-0
   Z Gofshtein vs G Huber, 1997 1-0

NOTABLE TOURNAMENTS: [what is this?]
   Hastings Chess Congress (2007)
   11th Essent Open (2007)
   Israeli Championship (2004)

RECENT GAMES:
   B Bok vs Z Gofshtein (Oct-17-12) 1-0
   Z Gofshtein vs D Svetushkin (Oct-16-12) 0-1
   R Edouard vs Z Gofshtein (Oct-15-12) 1-0
   Z Gofshtein vs G P Arnaudov (Oct-14-12) 1/2-1/2
   Z Gofshtein vs A Zhigalko (Oct-13-12) 0-1

Search Sacrifice Explorer for Zvulon Gofshtein
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ZVULON GOFSHTEIN
(born Apr-21-1953, died Dec-23-2015, 62 years old) Russia (federation/nationality Israel)

[what is this?]
Aka Leonid Gofshtein. GM Zvulon was born in the Soviet Union as Leonid.

Wikipedia article: Leonid Gofshtein


 page 1 of 11; games 1-25 of 260  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. Z Gofshtein vs Romanishin  1-066 1969 BeltsyE11 Bogo-Indian Defense
2. Karpov vs Z Gofshtein  1-037 1971 01, Rostov on Don ttA10 English
3. Kupreichik vs Z Gofshtein  1-030 1976 Ch URS (select)B06 Robatsch
4. Z Gofshtein vs T Georgadze 0-112 1976 Ch URS ( select )A15 English
5. Z Gofshtein vs Kupreichik  1-034 1976 URSD78 Neo-Grunfeld, 6.O-O c6
6. Z Gofshtein vs E Vladimirov  1-021 1977 URS-ch YME91 King's Indian
7. Z Gofshtein vs Chekhov  0-137 1977 URS-ch YME60 King's Indian Defense
8. Z Gofshtein vs E Kengis  1-031 1978 USSRC11 French
9. Igor Ivanov vs Z Gofshtein  1-041 1978 Daugavpils OtborochniiB46 Sicilian, Taimanov Variation
10. Kupreichik vs Z Gofshtein  ½-½33 1978 DaugavpilsC65 Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defense
11. Z Gofshtein vs Chekhov  ½-½23 1978 URS-ch sfA56 Benoni Defense
12. Z Gofshtein vs Salov  0-140 1979 Ch URS (select)E52 Nimzo-Indian, 4.e3, Main line with ...b6
13. Z Gofshtein vs Kupreichik 0-125 1979 URSD30 Queen's Gambit Declined
14. Z Gofshtein vs Yermolinsky  ½-½28 1985 Ch URS (select)E90 King's Indian
15. Tseshkovsky vs Z Gofshtein  1-040 1985 URS-ch sfB09 Pirc, Austrian Attack
16. Z Gofshtein vs G Timoshenko  1-024 1986 Kiev-chD38 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin Variation
17. Y Kruppa vs Z Gofshtein  1-062 1986 UKR-chC03 French, Tarrasch
18. Geller vs Z Gofshtein 1-028 1989 BelgradeB07 Pirc
19. Z Gofshtein vs V Vepkhvishvili  1-045 1989 Open VarnaA15 English
20. Z Gofshtein vs V Vepkhvishvili  1-047 1989 Open Bratislava-89E60 King's Indian Defense
21. G Timoshenko vs Z Gofshtein  1-041 1991 Hartberg opB07 Pirc
22. Z Gofshtein vs M D Tseitlin 1-034 1991 IsraelA48 King's Indian
23. N Davies vs Z Gofshtein  1-038 1991 It (cat.4)A80 Dutch
24. Z Gofshtein vs Smirin  ½-½32 1991 Tel AvivE81 King's Indian, Samisch
25. Z Gofshtein vs Psakhis  0-131 1991 Tel AvivA41 Queen's Pawn Game (with ...d6)
 page 1 of 11; games 1-25 of 260  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2) | Gofshtein wins | Gofshtein loses  

Kibitzer's Corner
Jun-27-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  Knight13: Zvulon Gofshtein. Zvulon is his first name.
Aug-30-06  BIDMONFA: Z Gofshtein

GOFSHTEIN, Zvulon
http://www.bidmonfa.com/gofshtein_z...
_

Apr-14-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: Is this the same person as Leonid D Gofshtein?
Jul-30-08  eyalbd: for <chessgames.com> The names "Zvulun Gofshtein" and "Leonid Gofshtein" are two different names for the same person. Leonid Gofshtein changed his name to a Hebrew name ("Zvulun") after immigrated to Israel.
Feb-14-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Tabanus: Did I write a bio on <Leonid D Gofshtein>? Anyway the postings there are gone now.
May-16-10  myschkin: . . .

<Lucky find> ?!

“In certain position, it is easy to find moves, because one’s choice is limited. In these types of positions, a club-player and a Grandmaster will pick the same moves. In other positions you have to choose between two or three approximately equal moves, and you have to reach a decision based on your style, your feeling your opponent. This is one of the hardest things in chess.” [B.G.]

Zvulon Gofshtein has quite a different approach to chess than Boris Gelfand. He states straight out that he is not the calculating type. That his analysis is frequently flawed and that his tactical ideas rest upon his strong intuition. He confesses that you cannot always play intuitively, that in some critical positions you must calculate, but that by and large playing by intuition is good. Gofshtein answers the questions of how far to calculate and when to stop as follows.

“When you feel that you position is good, that’s where calculation should end. You shouldn’t exert yourself unduly when effort is not required. This might cause harm.”

“If you continue to analyze beyond a certain point, you can miss something simple, and doubts begin to creep in. When you see too many things (some real, others imaginary) you may lose confidence.

“Moreover, by investing extra effort, you lose strength that may be needed later on in the game.”

(takeouts from The Grandmaster's Mind by Amatzia Avni)

Aug-11-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  OhioChessFan: <“Moreover, by investing extra effort, you lose strength that may be needed later on in the game.” >

I think that was a fundamental problem in the Man vs. Machine contests. Beyond the inevitable time trouble, the GMs wasted their energy staring at obvious moves for a longgggggg time. I suspect now the competition is so one sided it doesn't matter.

Jan-03-16  Eastfrisian: He died on 23. December 2015 after long illness. Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leoni... RIP GM Gofshtein
Jan-03-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: RIP to another opponent of long ago--we met in the Quebec Open blitz event at Montreal in summer 1997.

Although I lost both games--the first on time in a balanced position from a Taimanov Sicilian, the second after hanging my queen in a won position--he complimented my play.

While I have never read Avni's book, I consider Gofshtein's advice above an excellent, pragmatic approach. In particular, from the excerpt given by <myschkin>, this was long a failing in my play and tended to lead to chronic time shortage:

<“If you continue to analyze beyond a certain point, you can miss something simple, and doubts begin to creep in. When you see too many things (some real, others imaginary) you may lose confidence.>

Jan-03-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: RIP to another opponent of long ago--we met in the Quebec Open blitz event at Montreal in summer 1997.

Although I lost both games--the first on time in a balanced position from a Taimanov Sicilian, the second after hanging my queen in a won position--he complimented my play.

While I have never read Avni's book, I consider Gofshtein's advice above an excellent, pragmatic approach. In particular, from the excerpt given by <myschkin>, this was long a failing in my play and tended to lead to chronic time shortage:

<“If you continue to analyze beyond a certain point, you can miss something simple, and doubts begin to creep in. When you see too many things (some real, others imaginary) you may lose confidence.>

Apr-21-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: His adopted first name is a version of the biblical name Zebulon, a son of the patriarch Jacob.

He would have been 64 today.

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