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David Hume
  
Number of games in database: 1
Years covered: 1765


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DAVID HUME
(born May-07-1711, died Aug-25-1776, 65 years old) United Kingdom

[what is this?]
David Hume was a Scottish philosopher, historian, economist, and essayist known especially for his philosophical empiricism and scepticism.

Wikipedia article: David Hume


 page 1 of 1; one game  PGN Download 
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. J J Rousseau vs D Hume 1-0151765CasualB00 Uncommon King's Pawn Opening

Kibitzer's Corner
Aug-04-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  BishopBerkeley: Dialogue of Buddha and Nietzsche before God: Bertrand Russell's imaginary debate....

In chapter 25 (titled "Nietzsche") of Bertrand Russell's "A History of Western Philosophy" (1945), we find an imaginary dialogue between Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche and the Buddha. Perhaps you'll find it interesting (as I did)....

=== begin quoted passage (italicized words in the original enclosed in asterisks) ===

[Bertrand Russell, in his own voice]:

The ethical, as opposed to the political, question is one as to *sym­pathy*. Sympathy, in the sense of being made unhappy by the sufferi­ngs of others, is to some extent natural to human beings; young children are troubled when they hear other children crying. But the development of this feeling is very different in different people. Some find pleasure in the infliction of torture; others, like Buddha, feel that they cannot be completely happy so long as any living thing is suffering. Most people divide mankind emotionally into friends and enemies, feeling sympathy for the former, but not for the latter. An ethic such as that of Christianity or Buddhism has its emotional basis in universal sympathy; Nietzsche's, in a complete absence of sym­pathy. (He frequently preaches against sympathy, and in this respect one feels that he has no difficulty in obeying his own precepts.) The question is: If Buddha and Nietzsche were confronted, could either produce any argument that ought to appeal to the impartial listener? I am not thinking of political arguments. We can imagine them appear­ing before the Almighty, as in the first chapter of the Book of Job, and offering advice as to the sort of world He should create. What could either say?

[Bertrand Russell's imaginary dialogue between Buddha and Nietzsche]:

Buddha would open the argument by speaking of the lepers, outcast and miserable; the poor, toiling with aching limbs and barely kept alive by scanty nourishment; the wounded in battle, dying in slow agony; the orphans, ill-treated by cruel guardians; and even the most successful haunted by the thought of failure and death. From all this load of sorrow, he would say, a way of salvation must be found, and salvation can only come through love. Nietzsche, whom only Omnipotence could restrain from inter­rupting, would burst out when his turn came: "Good heavens, man, you must learn to be of tougher fibre. Why go about snivelling because trivial people suffer? Or, for that matter, because great men suffer? Trivial people suffer trivially, great men suffer greatly, and great sufferings are not to be regretted, because they are noble. Your ideal is a purely negative one, absence of suffering, which can be completely secured by non-existence. I, on the other hand, have positive ideals: I admire Alcibiades, and the Emperor Frederick II, and Napoleon. For the sake of such men, any misery is worth while. I appeal to You, Lord, as the greatest of creative artists, do not let Your artistic im­pulses be curbed by the degenerate fear-ridden maunderings of this wretched psychopath."

[continued]

Aug-04-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  BishopBerkeley: Dialogue of Buddha and Nietzsche before God: Bertrand Russell's imaginary debate....

[continued from above]

Buddha, who in the courts of Heaven has learnt all history since his death, and has mastered science with delight in the knowledge and sorrow at the use to which men have put it, replies with calm urbanity: "You are mistaken, Professor Nietzsche, in thinking my ideal a purely negative one. True, it includes a negative element, the absence of suffering; but it has in addition quite as much that is posi­tive as is to be found in your doctrine. Though I have no special admiration for Alcibiades and Napoleon, I, too, have my heroes: my successor Jesus, because he told men to love their enemies; the men who discovered how to master the forces of nature and secure food with less labour; the medical men who have shown how to diminish disease; the poets and artists and musicians who have caught glimpses of the Divine beatitude. Love and knowledge and delight in beauty are not negations; they are enough to fill the lives of the greatest men that have ever lived."

"All the same," Nietzsche replies, "your world would be insipid. You should study Heraclitus, whose works survive complete in the celestial library. Your love is compassion, which is elicited by pain; your truth, if you are honest, is unpleasant, and only to be known through suffering; and as to beauty, what is more beautiful than the tiger, who owes his splendour to his fierceness? No, if the Lord should decide for your world, I fear we should all die of boredom."

"You might," Buddha replies, "because you love pain, and your love of life is a sham. But those who really love life would be happy as no one can be happy in the world as it is."

[Bertrand Russell, in his own voice]:

For my part, I agree with Buddha as I have imagined him. But I do not know how to prove that he is right by any argument such as can be used in a mathematical or a scientific question. I dislike Nietzsche because he likes the contemplation of pain, because he erects conceit into a duty, because the men whom he most admires are conquerors, whose glory is cleverness in causing men to die. But I think the ultimate argument against his philosophy, as against any unpleasant but internally self-consistent ethic, lies not in an appeal to facts, but in an appeal to the emotions. Nietzsche despises universal love; I feel it the motive power to all that I desire as regards the world. His followers have had their innings, but we may hope that it is coming rapidly to an end. [conclusion of Chapter 25, titled "Nietzsche"]

=== end quoted passage ===

from Bertrand Russell's "A History of Western Philosophy," Chapter 25, p. 771-3; Simon & Schuster, ISBN 0-671-20158-1, copyright 1945, renewed 1972.

Needless to say (I hope!), I also (vastly) prefer the philosophy of the Buddha to that of Nietzsche as presented here. Based on my (limited) knowledge of the philosophy of David Hume, I suspect he would have the same preference.

(: ♗ Bishop Berkeley ♗ :)

May-04-08  Whitehat1963: David Hume could out-consume Schopenhauer and Hegel ...
Sep-02-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Quote of the Day (conservation zone)

" The chess-board is the world, the pieces are the phenomena of the Universe, the rules of the game are what we call the laws of Nature. The player on the other side is hidden from us. "

-- Thomas Huxley

Sep-12-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  BishopBerkeley: Autographed copy of Plato's Republic

I note that among the "20 most bizarre Craigslist adverts of all time," we find:

===

#16) Autographed copy of Plato's Republic

"1st edition of The Republic signed by its author. There is of course a reasonable amount of wear and tear, (light highlighting and underlining, dog-eared pages, back cover missing, etc.), but it is in overall good condition considering its age."

===

From the UK Telegraph:

http://tinyurl.com/l53nsn

I'll have to put this one on the shelf next to my unauthorized autobiography of Schopenhauer!

(: ♗ Bishop Berkeley ♗ :)

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