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Resignation Trap
Member since Oct-25-03 · Last seen Jan-11-17
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>> Click here to see Resignation Trap's game collections.

   Resignation Trap has kibitzed 3492 times to chessgames   [more...]
   Jan-11-17 Romanishin vs E Lobron, 1985
 
Resignation Trap: Instead of 37...Qxc1+??, Black should play 37...Qh2# :)
 
   Sep-27-16 Timman vs Salov, 1988
 
Resignation Trap: Salov's Rook came "into play" with 12...Rf6 and 17...Rh6. But the Rook really didn't do anything there, and he lost the game because it couldn't return to the scene of action.
 
   Sep-19-16 Jorge Alberto Rubinetti (replies)
 
Resignation Trap: I just learned of the news of Rubinetti's death today of lung failure.
 
   Sep-16-16 C Jaffe vs Duras, 1913
 
Resignation Trap: Position after 19...Nc4: [DIAGRAM] White should try 20. Nb3! and if 20...Nxa3, 21. f4! with a strong attack. Jaffe's 20. Nxc4? dxc4! gives Black a strong passed Pawn, opens a great diagonal for Black's Bishop, and leaves his own d-Pawn vulnerable to attack. Position ...
 
   Sep-04-16 Mamedyarov vs R Makoto, 2016
 
Resignation Trap: Black missed several chances to improve his position. Here's the first critical position after 37. Qb1: [DIAGRAM] Here, 37...Bb5 is good, and Black is at least equal. A few moves later, after 38.Rxa6: [DIAGRAM] Black has 38...b3! 39. Bxb3 Bb5, which should hold due to ...
 
   Aug-23-16 Reshevsky vs V Petrov, 1937
 
Resignation Trap: Black has more than enough compensation for the exchange as White's King is exposed. Black missed more than one chance after 31. Rc2: [DIAGRAM] 31...d3 wins: If 32. Qxd3 Qf5+ 33. Qf3 Rf4. If 32. Rcc1 d2 33. Rd1 Bc5+ 34. Kg3 g5! But wait! There's more after 35. Qd4: ...
 
   Aug-22-16 V Petrov vs E Steiner, 1937
 
Resignation Trap: I firmly believe that the score of this game as shown on this site is wrong. If not, it is a sad blunderfest. For example, this position after 58. Re7: [DIAGRAM] Black allegedly played 58...Re1?? which would allow instant equality with the obvious 59. Nf6+, but White ...
 
   Aug-18-16 Tolush vs A Bannik, 1958
 
Resignation Trap: Tolush was known as THE Grandmaster of Attack, but here he misses a rare opportunity. [DIAGRAM] White played 28. Rf1?, but 28. Nxh6! gxh6 29. Rxe6!! (deflecting the Queen off the f4 Pawn) Qxe6 30. Rg6 wins immediately.
 
   Jul-12-16 M Pavey vs Keres, 1954 (replies)
 
Resignation Trap: Photo of this game: http://sah.hr/forum/index.php?actio...
 
   Jul-12-16 Reshevsky vs F Apsenieks, 1937
 
Resignation Trap: Position after 76. gxh5: [DIAGRAM] This position should be drawn, and 76...Rh1, 76...Rf1+ or 76...Kh7 should suffice. Black's 76...Rg5? allows 77.f5! and there's no salvation for Black. He later tries some stalemate attempts, but to no avail. The Latvian could have ...
 
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