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Shams
Member since Oct-21-04 · Last seen Mar-02-15
digphillips at gmail

The names of the chess pieces in 73 languages:
http://reocities.com/TimesSquare/me...

Dump the World Championship. Chess should be like tennis: four majors a year.

"I believe what a man tells me about himself. Until he tells me something different, and then I believe that." -- Ray Bradbury

http://www.psychologytoday.com/arti...

>> Click here to see Shams's game collections.

Chessgames.com Full Member

   Shams has kibitzed 18653 times to chessgames   [more...]
   Mar-02-15 Kenneth Rogoff (replies)
 
Shams: <kellmano> Do all the votes put together count? If so, I'm wondering at what point voting ceases to matter as you reduce the number of votes from all of them down to just one.
 
   Mar-02-15 technical draw chessforum (replies)
 
Shams: <td> Orange you gonna ask me my favorite move of this game? R Naranja vs S Schweber, 1960
 
   Mar-01-15 A Fier vs Ftacnik, 2014
 
Shams: A great fight. After 19 moves I liked the pawns more than the piece, but White's play looks convincing.
 
   Feb-28-15 R Hovhannisyan vs I Iljiushenok, 2015 (replies)
 
Shams: White had to be thinking, "how in sam hill is this guy untitled?"
 
   Feb-28-15 moronovich chessforum (replies)
 
Shams: <FSR> How much of Lakdawala's book covers 1.c4 b6? Danny King's book is out of date.
 
   Feb-28-15 Shams chessforum (replies)
 
Shams: <cro> What (in brief!) is the advantage of Gurevich's move order?
 
   Feb-27-15 Penguincw chessforum (replies)
 
Shams: Like a swallow to Capistrano...
 
   Feb-27-15 Kibitzer's Café (replies)
 
Shams: <In her role as Lieutenant Uhura, Nichols famously kissed white actor William Shatner as Captain James T. Kirk in the November 22, 1968, Star Trek episode "Plato's Stepchildren". The episode is popularly cited as the first example of an interracial kiss on U.S. television. The ...
 
   Feb-26-15 optimal play chessforum (replies)
 
Shams: No chance you could favor us with an etymology?
 
   Feb-26-15 chessgames.com chessforum (replies)
 
Shams: Is there any way to know which users have tripped the PITA flag? I'm dying of curiosity, I can't lie.
 
(replies) indicates a reply to the comment.

The Bunny Hutch

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 33 OF 33 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Feb-25-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  moronovich: Other candidate moves : Nb4
Rc8,Ke7(connecting the rooks and bringing the king closer to the queenside) and the very sharp h6,toying with g5 attacking f4 and softening e5.But till now the analysis showed it was too risky.
Feb-25-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Shams: <moronovich> Thank you so much for that! I appreciate it. I'll go over your analysis very carefully later tonight.

I'll reproduce the diagram here, Black to move:


click for larger view

Out of curiosity, do you play the French much? If I remember correctly your real love is 1.e4 b6.

Feb-25-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Domdaniel: <Shams> Thanks for the 'parting' game - I left some more French comments on my forum. Mostly on Advance/Wade lines. And also on the Volokotin game.

Meanwhile, a return gift: I really like this game. White plays 6.a4 before 9.a3 and 10.Nc2, with similar ideas. There are 4 examples of this in the CG database, where Black replies to 10.Nc2 with 4 different moves and wins all 4 games.

Black comes up with some very nice ideas, from 10...Bb4+ dislodging the King (Nxb4 is weaker) and the immediate retreat ...Be7 to support a Knight on h4. This is a case, I think, where ...Nh6 isn't so good for Black, but ...Nge7-f5 is.

There are many more fine moves by Stean, right to the end: Y Afek vs M Stean, 1977

Feb-25-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  cro777: Hi <Shams>. In regard to the system against the French Advance Variation recommended by Langrock, that you have mentioned in <Domdaniel>'s forum, here are a sample of Sinisa Drazic's games (a grandmaster who uses it regularly).

"As tournament praxis has shown, Black shouldn't have any problems here, and in general not after the tame 6.Be2."

[Event "Zadar op-A 17th"]
[Site "Zadar"]
[Date "2010.12.15"]
[Round "5"]
[White "Tomazini, Zan"]
[Black "Drazic, Sinisa"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "B28"]
[WhiteElo "2257"]
[BlackElo "2524"]
[PlyCount "74"]
[EventDate "2010.12.12"]
[EventType "swiss"]
[EventRounds "9"]
[EventCountry "CRO"]
[Source "ChessBase"]
[SourceDate "2011.01.05"]

1. e4 c5 2. c3 e6 3. d4 d5 4. e5 Bd7 5. Nf3 a6 6. Be2 cxd4 7. cxd4 Bb5 8. Bxb5+ (8. O-O Nc6 9. Nc3 Bxe2 10. Qxe2 Nge7 11. Be3 Nf5 12. Rac1 Rc8 13. Na4 Qa5 14. Nc5 Bxc5 15. Rxc5 Qxa2 16. g4 Nfe7 17. Qd3 b6 18. Rc3 Qa5 19. Bd2 Qb5 20. Qxb5 axb5 21. Ra1 h5 22. h3 hxg4 23. hxg4 Kd7 24. Rb3 Rh3 25. Kg2 Rch8 26. Raa3 Ng6 27. Bg5 f6 28. exf6 gxf6 29. Bxf6 Nf4+ 30. Kf1 Rh1+ 31. Ng1 b4 32. Ra6 Rc8 33. Ra1 Rg8 34. Rg3 Rg6 35. Be5 Nxe5 36. dxe5 Rg5 37. Re1 Kc6 38. Ree3 Kc5 39. Ref3 Ng6 40. Rf6 Nxe5 41. Kg2 Nxg4 42. Kxh1 Rh5+ 43. Kg2 Nxf6 44. Ne2 Ne4 45. Re3 Rg5+ 46. Kf1 Rf5 47. f3 e5 48. Kg2 Nd6 49. b3 Rh5 50. Ng3 Rg5 0-1 (50) ♙ulito, A (2202)-Drazic,S (2495) Lodi 2005) 8... axb5 9. O-O b4 10. Nbd2 Nc6 11. Re1 ( 11. Nb3 Nge7 12. Qd3 Qb6 13. Bg5 Qa6 14. Qd2 Qb5 15. Rfc1 h6 16. Be3 Nf5 17. Bf4 Be7 18. g4 Nh4 19. Nxh4 Bxh4 20. Be3 Be7 21. Qd1 O-O 22. f4 1/2-1/2 (22) Vitolins,E (2444)-Adams,M (2245) ICCF 2012) 11... Nge7 12. Nf1 Nf5 13. Ne3 Nxe3 14. Bxe3 Be7 15. g3 O-O 16. h4 Ra6 17. Ng5 Qb6 18. Qh5 h6 19. Nf3 Rfa8 20. Nh2 Rxa2 21. Rxa2 Rxa2 22. Ng4 Qa6 23. Bxh6 g6 24. Nf6+ Bxf6 25. Qf3 Be7 26. h5 Ra1 27. Bc1 Nxd4 28. Qg4 Rxc1 29. Rxc1 Ne2+ 30. Kh2 Nxc1 31. hxg6 Qe2 32. gxf7+ Kxf7 33. Qf4+ Kg7 34. Qxc1 Qxf2+ 35. Kh3 Qf5+ 36. Kh2 Qxe5 37. Qd1 Bd6 0-1

Feb-25-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  cro777: "Black's main idea is to take on d4 and after cxd4 play ...Bb5 to exchange bishops (the key idea of the entire system). What should White do against this?"

1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.e5 c5 4.c3 Bd7 5.Nf3 a6!?


click for larger view

"Black's main idea was nicely demonstrated against White's standard moves 6. Be2 cxd4 7. cxd4 Bb5. Two rather simple ways to prevent Black's bishop from getting to b5 (6.Na3 and 6.a4?!) haven't proven very effective. The disadvantages tend to outbalance the advantages here, especially in case of the move 6.a4?! (which weakens the b4-square)"

[Event "Skopje Karposh op"]
[Site "Skopje"]
[Date "2014.04.02"]
[Round "6"]
[White "Vovk, Andrey"]
[Black "Drazic, Sinisa"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B28"]
[WhiteElo "2605"]
[BlackElo "2415"]
[PlyCount "159"]
[EventDate "2014.03.29"]
[EventType "swiss"]
[EventRounds "9"]
[EventCountry "MKD"]
[Source "ChessBase"]
[SourceDate "2014.04.24"]

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 c5 (3... Bd7 4. Bd3 a6 5. a4 c5 6. c3 Nc6 7. Nf3 cxd4 8. cxd4 Qb6 9. Nc3 Nxd4 10. Nxd4 Qxd4 11. O-O Ne7 12. Re1 Nc6 13. Be3 Qb4 14. Bd2 Qb6 15. a5 Qd8 16. Na4 Nxa5 17. b4 Nc4 18. Bxc4 dxc4 0-1 (18) Eggenberger, S-Antognini,F (2232) Lenzerheide 2006) 4. c3 Bd7 5. Nf3 a6 6. Na3 (6. a4 Nc6 7. dxc5 Bxc5 8. Bd3 f6 9. exf6 Nxf6 10. O-O O-O 11. Bg5 e5 12. b4 Bb6 13. b5 axb5 14. Bxb5 Bg4 15. h3 Bh5 16. Be2 Qd6 17. Na3 Ne4 18. Nb5 Qd7 19. Bh4 Rf4 20. g3 Rxh4 21. gxh4 Ng3 22. Bc4 Rd8 23. Kg2 Nxf1 24. Bxf1 e4 25. Ne5 Bxd1 26. Nxd7 Bf3+ 0-1 (26) Orlov,A (2360)-Wyrwich,T (2245) Germany 2000) 6... cxd4 7. cxd4 Bb4+ (7... Bxa3 8. bxa3 Qa5+ 9. Bd2 Qxa3 10. Qb1 Bb5 11. Bxb5+ axb5 12. Qxb5+ Nc6 13. Ke2 Nge7 14. Rhb1 O-O 15. Rb3 Nf5 16. Bc3 Qa4 17. Kd3 Qxb5+ 18. Rxb5 Ra3 19. Rxb7 Rfa8 20. Rb6 Nfe7 21. Rb2 h6 22. Kd2 R8a4 23. Ne1 Na5 24. Rb8+ Kh7 25. Nc2 Rxa2 26. Rxa2 Rxa2 27. Bxa5 Nc6 28. Ra8 Rxa5 29. Rxa5 Nxa5 30. Ne3 Nc6 1/2-1/2 (30) Stellwagen,D (2636)-♔roeze,F (2424) ♘etherlands 2010) 8. Bd2 Qa5 9. Bd3 Nc6 10. Nc2 Bxd2+ 11. Qxd2 Qxd2+ 12. Kxd2 Nge7 13. h4 O-O 14. Rac1 Rac8 15. h5 h6 16. Rce1 Na5 17. b3 Bb5 18. Nb4 Nac6 19. Nxc6 Nxc6 20. Bb1 a5 21. Rc1 b6 22. Rc3 Ne7 23. Rhc1 Rxc3 24. Rxc3 Rc8 25. Rxc8+ Nxc8 26. Nh4 Ne7 27. g4 f6 28. f4 Kf7 29. Ke3 Ba6 30. Bg6+ Kf8 31. Bc2 Kf7 32. a3 Bb5 33. Bg6+ Kf8 34. f5 Bd7 35. Kf4 Bc8 36. fxe6 Bxe6 37. exf6 gxf6 38. Bf5 Kf7 39. Bd3 Nc6 40. Nf3 Ke7 41. Bb5 Nd8 42. Nh4 Nf7 43. Bc6 Nd6 44. Ng2 Nc8 45. Bb7 Nd6 46. Ba6 Kf8 47. Ne3 Kf7 48. Nd1 Ke7 49. Nc3 Kd7 50. Bb5+ Kc7 51. Bd3 Ne8 52. Bf5 Bg8 53. g5 hxg5+ 54. Kg4 Nd6 55. h6 Kc6 56. h7 Bxh7 57. Bxh7 a4 58. Bg8 f5+ 59. Kf3 Ne4 60. Bxd5+ Kd6 61. Bxe4 fxe4+ 62. Nxe4+ Kd5 63. Nc3+ Kxd4 64. Nxa4 b5 65. Nb2 Kc3 66. a4 bxa4 67. bxa4 Kb4 68. Kg4 Kc5 69. Kxg5 Kb4 70. Kf4 Kc5 71. Ke5 Kb4 72. Kd6 Ka5 73. Kc6 Ka6 74. Nc4 Ka7 75. Kb5 Kb7 76. a5 Kc7 77. a6 Kb8 78. Kb6 Ka8 79. Nd6 Kb8 80. Nb5 1-0

Feb-25-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Shams: <cro777> Thanks for that.
Feb-25-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  cro777: "A more critical try is the little pawn move 6.a3"

[Event "Valle d'Aosta op 11th"]
[Site "Saint Vincent"]
[Date "2003.02.16"]
[Round "9"]
[White "Delchev, Aleksander"]
[Black "Drazic, Sinisa"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "B28"]
[WhiteElo "2583"]
[BlackElo "2462"]
[PlyCount "101"]
[EventDate "2003.02.08"]
[EventType "swiss"]
[EventRounds "9"]
[EventCountry "ITA"]
[Source "ChessBase"]
[SourceDate "2003.03.07"]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 a6 4. c3 d5 5. e5 Bd7 6. a3 cxd4 (6... c4 7. b3 cxb3 8. Qxb3 Qc7 9. c4 dxc4 10. Qxc4 Qxc4 11. Bxc4 Ne7 12. Nc3 Bc6 13. Bg5 Nd7 14. Bxe7 Bxe7 15. d5 exd5 16. Bxd5 Rc8 17. O-O Nb6 18. Bxc6+ Rxc6 19. Ne4 O-O 20. Rfb1 Rfc8 21. h3 R8c7 22. Nd4 Rc4 23. Rxb6 Rxd4 24. Nd6 Rd5 25. Rab1 Rxe5 26. Nxb7 h5 27. Nd6 Bxd6 28. Rxd6 a5 29. Rbd1 Rcc5 30. g3 g6 31. h4 Kg7 32. R6d4 Rf5 33. R1d2 Rc3 34. a4 Ra3 35. Kg2 Rf6 36. Re4 Rb6 1/2-1/2 (36) Ivekovic,Z (2318)-Sulava,♘ (2554) Sibenik 2011) 7. cxd4 Bb5 8. Bxb5+ axb5 9. O-O (9. Bg5 Qa5+ 10. Nbd2 h6 11. Be3 b4 12. O-O bxa3 13. bxa3 Ne7 14. Qb3 Ra7 15. Nb1 Qa4 16. Qb2 Qd7 17. Nc3 Nec6 18. Nb5 Ra6 19. Rfc1 Be7 20. Nd6+ Bxd6 21. exd6 Qxd6 22. Qxb7 O-O 23. Bd2 Rd8 24. a4 Rd7 25. Qb5 Na7 26. Qb2 Rb6 27. Qa2 Rdb7 28. a5 Rb2 29. Qa4 Nbc6 30. Bc3 R2b5 31. Ne5 Nxe5 32. dxe5 Qa6 33. Bd4 Nc6 34. Bb6 Nxe5 35. Rc8+ Kh7 36. Qc2+ f5 37. Re1 Nd3 38. Rd1 Nb4 39. Qc1 e5 40. h3 e4 41. Rf8 R7xb6 42. axb6 Rxb6 43. Rxf5 Rg6 44. Qc5 Qe6 45. Qf8 e3 46. fxe3 Nc2 47. Rf3 Nxe3 48. Rd2 Nc4 49. Rdf2 Nd2 50. Ra3 Qe4 51. Qf5 Qe7 52. Rd3 Ne4 53. Rf4 Ng3 1/2-1/2 (53) ♖ogulj,♗ (2427)-Drazic,S (2493) Jesolo 1999) 9... b4 10. Bg5 Ne7 11. Nbd2 h6 12. Bxe7 Bxe7 13. axb4 Rxa1 14. Qxa1 Bxb4 15. Qa4+ Nc6 16. Nb3 O-O 17. Qb5 Qe7 18. Ra1 Rc8 19. h4 Qd7 20. h5 Be7 21. Nc5 Bxc5 22. Qxc5 Qd8 23. Qb5 Ra8 24. Rc1 Qe7 25. g3 Ra5 26. Qb6 Ra4 27. Rc5 Ra6 28. Qb3 Qc7 29. Kg2 Rb6 30. Qc3 Qe7 31. Kf1 Qf8 32. Qa3 Ra6 33. Qd3 Rb6 34. Rb5 Qd8 35. Qb3 Rxb5 36. Qxb5 Qa8 37. Kg2 Qa7 38. g4 Qa6 39. Qb3 Qe2 40. Qc3 Qe4 41. Kg3 g5 42. hxg6 Qxg6 43. Nh4 Qe4 44. Nf3 Qg6 45. Nh4 Qb1 46. Qd2 Kg7 47. Nf3 Qg6 48. Nh4 Qe4 49. Nf3 Qg6 50. Nh4 Qe4 51. Nf3 1/2-1/2

Feb-25-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  cro777: "The move h4 is actually more reasonable. Anticipating Black's idea, White does not waste a tempo with his f1-bishop and makes a useful move instead."

[Event "SRB-chT 1st League"]
[Site "Vrnjacka Banja"]
[Date "2010.08.29"]
[Round "9"]
[White "Podinic, Vladimir"]
[Black "Drazic, Sinisa"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B28"]
[WhiteElo "2400"]
[BlackElo "2535"]
[PlyCount "189"]
[EventDate "2010.08.21"]
[EventType "team-tourn"]
[EventRounds "11"]
[EventCountry "YUG"]
[Source "ChessBase"]
[SourceDate "2010.10.29"]

1. e4 e6 2. d4 c5 3. c3 a6 4. Nf3 d5 5. e5 Bd7 6. h4 h6 (6... cxd4 7. cxd4 Bb5 8. Bxb5+ axb5 9. Nc3 b4 10. Ne2 Ne7 11. Nf4 Qb6 12. O-O Nd7 13. Be3 Nf5 14. Ng5 Be7 15. Qg4 h5 16. Qh3 g6 17. b3 Kf8 18. Rac1 Bxg5 19. hxg5 Kg7 20. Rc2 Rhc8 21. Rfc1 Rxc2 22. Rxc2 Qd8 23. Nd3 Rc8 24. Nxb4 Rxc2 25. Nxc2 Qc7 26. Ne1 Qa5 27. Nf3 Qxa2 28. Nd2 Nxd4 29. Bxd4 Qxd2 30. Qe3 Qd1+ 31. Kh2 Nb8 32. Bc5 Nc6 33. Qf4 Qxb3 34. Qf6+ Kg8 35. Bd6 Qc4 36. f4 b5 37. f5 Qf4+ 0-1 (37) Meinhardt,M (2381)-♔naak,♖ (2486) Germany 2006) 7. h5 Qb6 8. a3 Bb5 9. Bxb5+ Qxb5 10. b4 cxd4 11. Nxd4 Qd7 12. Be3 Ne7 13. Nd2 Nbc6 14. f4 Nxd4 15. Bxd4 Nc6 16. Bf2 Be7 17. Nb3 f6 18. Nc5 Bxc5 19. Bxc5 fxe5 20. fxe5 Nxe5 21. O-O Nc4 22. Qg4 O-O-O 23. Qg6 Qc6 24. Rae1 e5 25. Rf7 Qxg6 26. hxg6 Rd7 27. Ref1 b6 28. Bf8 Rg8 29. R1f5 b5 30. Kf2 h5 31. Bc5 Re8 32. Rxh5 Re6 33. Rh8+ Rd8 34. Rxd8+ Kxd8 35. Rxg7 Nd6 36. Rg8+ Ne8 37. Kg3 Kd7 38. Kh4 d4 39. cxd4 exd4 40. Rf8 Rxg6 41. Rf2 d3 42. Rd2 Kc6 43. g3 Nd6 44. Rxd3 Nc4 45. Kh5 Rg8 46. Rf3 Kd5 47. g4 Ne5 48. Rf4 Ke6 49. Re4 Rh8+ 50. Kg5 Rg8+ 51. Kh4 Kd5 52. Rd4+ Kc6 53. Kg3 Rg7 54. Rd6+ Kc7 55. Kf4 Nxg4 56. Rxa6 Rg8 57. Ra7+ Kc6 58. Rh7 Kd5 59. Rh5+ Ke6 60. Bd4 Rd8 61. Ke4 Ra8 62. Rh4 Rg8 63. Rh5 Ra8 64. Rg5 Nh2 65. Rg6+ Kd7 66. Rg2 Nf1 67. Kd5 Rxa3 68. Rg7+ Ke8 69. Kc6 Ne3 70. Bc5 Nf5 71. Rh7 Rg3 72. Kxb5 Rg6 73. Ka5 Ng7 74. b5 Ne6 75. Bf2 Rg2 76. Bh4 Ra2+ 77. Kb4 Nd4 78. b6 Rb2+ 79. Kc5 Rb5+ 80. Kxd4 Rxb6 81. Bg3 Rb5 82. Bd6 Rf5 83. Re7+ Kd8 84. Ra7 Ke8 85. Be5 Kf8 86. Kd5 Kg8 87. Ke6 Rg5 88. Ra8+ Kh7 89. Kf6 Rg1 90. Kf7 Rg7+ 91. Ke6 Rb7 92. Kf5 Kh6 93. Ra2 Kh7 94. Rh2+ Kg8 95. Rh8+ 1-0

Feb-25-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  cro777: "A very reasonable approach for White is trying to control the d4-outpost with a piece, either starting with 6.Nbd2 cxd4 7.Nxd4 or 6.Bd3 cxd4 7.Nxd4. However, Black can challenge this plan with ...Ne7! followed by ...Nbc6"

[Event "Ljubljana op 8th"]
[Site "Ljubljana"]
[Date "1997.??.??"]
[Round "7"]
[White "Sveshnikov, Evgeny"]
[Black "Drazic, Sinisa"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B28"]
[WhiteElo "2560"]
[BlackElo "2430"]
[PlyCount "120"]
[EventDate "1997.06.??"]
[EventType "swiss"]
[EventRounds "9"]
[EventCountry "SLO"]
[Source "ChessBase"]
[SourceDate "1997.11.17"]

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 c5 (3... Bd7 4. c3 a6 5. Bd3 c5 6. Nf3 cxd4 7. Nxd4 Ne7 8. Nd2 Nbc6 9. N2f3 Qc7 10. Nxc6 Nxc6 11. Bf4 h6 12. h4 d4 13. cxd4 Nb4 14. a3 Nxd3+ 15. Qxd3 Bb5 16. Qd1 Qc6 17. Rc1 Qe4+ 18. Be3 Be7 19. Rc3 O-O 20. a4 Bc6 21. O-O Rac8 22. b3 Bd5 23. Bd2 Rxc3 24. Bxc3 Rc8 25. Re1 Qg4 26. Re3 Bxh4 27. Qf1 Be7 28. Nd2 b5 29. axb5 axb5 30. b4 Bg5 31. Rg3 Qf5 32. Qxb5 Bh4 0-1 (32) Schlosser,♙ (2570)-♗raun,A (2463) Altenkirchen 2005) 4. c3 Bd7 5. Nf3 a6 6. Nbd2 cxd4 7. Nxd4 (7. cxd4 Ne7 8. Be2 Bb5 9. Bxb5+ axb5 10. Nf1 Nf5 11. Qd3 Nc6 12. Ng3 Nh4 13. Nxh4 Qxh4 14. Be3 Bb4+ 15. Kf1 Ra5 16. Ne2 Be7 17. h3 O-O 18. g3 Nb4 19. Qb1 Qh5 20. g4 Qg6 21. Qxg6 fxg6 22. Bd2 Rxa2 23. Rxa2 Nxa2 24. Kg2 Rc8 25. Ra1 Rc2 26. Rxa2 Rxd2 27. Kf3 Rd3+ 28. Kg2 b4 29. Ra7 Kf7 30. Rxb7 Rd2 31. Kf3 Rd3+ 32. Kg2 Rd2 33. Kf3 Rxb2 34. Nf4 Rb3+ 35. Ke2 Rb2+ 36. Ke3 g5 37. Nd3 Rb3 38. Ke2 g6 39. f3 Rc3 40. Nc5 Rc2+ 41. Ke3 Rc3+ 42. Ke2 Rc2+ 43. Ke3 h5 44. Nd3 Rh2 45. Nf2 Rg2 46. Nd3 Rh2 47. Nf2 Rg2 48. Nd3 Rg1 49. Ke2 Rh1 50. Nf2 Rc1 51. Nd3 Rc2+ 52. Ke3 Rc3 53. Ke2 Rc4 54. Ke3 Rc3 55. Ke2 Ra3 56. Rb8 Ra2+ 57. Ke3 1/2-1/2 (57) Mukhametov,E (2390)-Drazic,S (2405) Sofia 1994) 7... Nc6 8. N2f3 Nge7 9. Bf4 Ng6 10. Bg3 Nxd4 11. Qxd4 h5 12. h3 Bb5 13. Bxb5+ axb5 14. O-O Qc7 15. Qd3 Qc4 16. Qc2 h4 17. Bh2 b4 18. Nd4 Ra6 19. cxb4 Bxb4 20. Qxc4 dxc4 21. Rfc1 c3 22. bxc3 Bc5 23. Nb3 Ba7 24. Rc2 O-O 25. Rd1 Rc8 26. Rd7 b5 27. Rb7 Bb6 28. Kf1 Rc4 29. Nd2 Rc6 30. Ne4 Rc7 31. Rb8+ Kh7 32. Rb2 b4 33. Rxb4 Ba7 34. R8b7 Rxb7 35. Rxb7 Nh8 36. Rb2 Ra4 37. f3 Ng6 38. Ke2 Ra5 39. f4 Ne7 40. g4 hxg3 41. Bxg3 Kg6 42. Kf3 Ra3 43. Be1 Nd5 44. Bd2 f6 45. Bc1 Ra4 46. Rg2+ Kh7 47. h4 Rc4 48. h5 f5 49. Ng5+ Kh6 50. Nf7+ Kh7 51. Bd2 Nxc3 52. Rg6 Ne4 53. Ng5+ Kh8 54. Rxe6 g6 55. h6 Nxg5+ 56. fxg5 Bd4 57. Rxg6 Rc2 58. Re6 Rxa2 59. g6 Ra8 60. Bg5 Ra3+ 1-0

Feb-25-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  cro777: "6.Be3 is the third most popular move after 5...a6. It has the disadvantage of leaving b2 unprotected though, which Black can make use of by playing 6...cxd4 7.cxd4 Qb6! Instead, in Popilsky-Soffer, Black chose the standard 7...Bb5 and also did well"

[Event "Djakovo op-A"]
[Site "Djakovo"]
[Date "2005.05.01"]
[Round "1"]
[White "Avdic, Adnan"]
[Black "Drazic, Sinisa"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "B28"]
[WhiteElo "2304"]
[BlackElo "2495"]
[PlyCount "64"]
[EventDate "2005.05.01"]
[EventType "swiss"]
[EventRounds "9"]
[EventCountry "CRO"]
[Source "ChessBase"]
[SourceDate "2005.07.01"]

1. e4 e6 2. d4 c5 3. c3 d5 4. e5 Bd7 5. Nf3 a6 6. Be3 cxd4 7. cxd4 Bb5 (7... Qb6 8. Qd2 Bb4 9. Nc3 Ne7 10. Bd3 Bb5 11. Bxb5+ Qxb5 12. Nxb5 Bxd2+ 13. Kxd2 axb5 14. Rhc1 Na6 15. Ne1 Kd7 16. Nd3 Rhc8 17. g4 Rxc1 18. Rxc1 h5 19. gxh5 Nf5 20. Ke2 b6 21. a3 Rh8 22. Nf4 Nb8 23. Kd3 Nc6 24. Rg1 Nce7 25. Bd2 Nc6 26. Bc3 Rh7 27. Rg5 Nh4 28. Rg4 Nf5 29. Rg5 Nh4 30. Rg4 Nf5 1/2-1/2 (30) Aagaard,J (2528)-Izoria,Z (2610) Dresden 2008) 8. Bxb5+ axb5 9. O-O b4 10. Qd3 Nc6 11. Nbd2 Nge7 12. a3 (12. Nb3 Qb6 13. Rfc1 Nf5 14. Bg5 h6 15. Bd2 Be7 16. g4 Nh4 17. Nxh4 Bxh4 18. f4 Be7 19. Kh1 h5 20. f5 hxg4 21. fxe6 Nxe5 22. Qf5 Nf3 23. exf7+ Kf8 24. Bf4 Nxh2 25. Kg2 Nf3 26. Qxg4 Qg6 27. Qxg6 Nh4+ 28. Kf2 Nxg6 29. Bg3 Kxf7 30. Rc7 Rhc8 31. Kf3 Rxc7 32. Bxc7 Nf8 33. Nc1 Ne6 34. Be5 Rc8 35. Nd3 Rc4 36. Rd1 Bf6 37. b3 Nxd4+ 38. Kg4 Nxb3+ 0-1 (38) ♙opilski,G (2523)-Soffer, ♖ (2516) Acre 2013) 12... Nf5 13. axb4 Bxb4 14. Qb5 O-O 15. Nb3 Qd7 16. Bf4 h5 17. h3 f6 18. Qe2 Rxa1 19. Rxa1 g5 20. Bc1 g4 21. hxg4 hxg4 22. Nh2 g3 23. Nf3 Qh7 24. Qc2 fxe5 25. fxg3 Nfxd4 26. Nbxd4 Nxd4 27. Qxh7+ Kxh7 28. Nxe5 Ne2+ 29. Kh2 Rf5 30. Nf3 Rh5+ 31. Nh4 Bd6 32. Kh3 Bxg3 0-1

Feb-25-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  cro777: "The most frequent move is 6.Bd3 and this is also one of the critical tests of Black's set-up, especially if White answers 6...cxd4 with 7.cxd4 Bb5 8.Bc2!"

[Event "Zupanja op-A 13th"]
[Site "Zupanja"]
[Date "2007.01.09"]
[Round "9"]
[White "Predojevic, Borki"]
[Black "Drazic, Sinisa"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B28"]
[WhiteElo "2587"]
[BlackElo "2483"]
[PlyCount "73"]
[EventDate "2007.01.03"]
[EventType "swiss"]
[EventRounds "9"]
[EventCountry "CRO"]
[Source "ChessBase"]
[SourceDate "2007.03.07"]

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 c5 4. c3 Bd7 5. Nf3 a6 6. Bd3 cxd4 7. cxd4 (7. Nxd4 Nc6 8. Nxc6 Bxc6 9. Qe2 Qd7 10. O-O Ne7 11. Na3 Ng6 12. Nc2 Bc5 13. Be3 Bxe3 14. Qxe3 Bb5 15. f4 O-O 16. Nd4 Bxd3 17. Qxd3 f6 18. exf6 Rxf6 19. g3 e5 20. fxe5 Nxe5 21. Qe2 Rxf1+ 22. Rxf1 Re8 23. Qh5 g6 24. Qg5 Nf7 25. Qd2 Nd6 26. Nf3 Nc4 27. Qd4 Re4 28. Qc5 b6 29. Qf2 Qe7 30. Nd4 Ne3 31. Rc1 h5 32. Nf3 b5 33. Re1 Nc4 34. b3 Ne3 35. Qd2 Kg7 36. Qd3 Nf5 37. Qd2 h4 38. gxh4 Nxh4 39. Rf1 Nf5 40. Re1 Qc5+ 41. Kh1 Qc6 42. Nd4 Qf6 43. Nxf5+ Qxf5 44. Qd1 Qh3 45. Rxe4 dxe4 46. Qd4+ Kh7 47. Kg1 Qg4+ 48. Kf1 Qf3+ 49. Qf2 Qd3+ 50. Kg2 Qd5 51. Qe3 g5 52. Kf2 Qf5+ 53. Ke2 Qe5 54. Qg3 Qd5 55. Qe3 Kg6 56. Qb6+ Kh5 57. Qe3 Qe5 58. Qh3+ Kg6 59. Qg3 Qd5 60. Ke1 e3 61. Qxe3 Qh1+ 62. Kd2 Qxh2+ 63. Kd3 Qd6+ 64. Ke2 g4 65. c4 bxc4 66. bxc4 Kf5 67. Qd3+ Qxd3+ 68. Kxd3 a5 69. a4 Kf4 70. c5 Ke5 71. Ke3 Kd5 72. Kf4 Kxc5 73. Kxg4 Kb4 74. Kf4 Kxa4 75. Ke3 Kb3 0-1 (75) Sanduleac,V (2480)-Drazic,S (2467) Subotica 2003) 7... Bb5 8. Bc2 Bb4+ (8... a5 9. Nc3 Bb4 10. Bd2 Bxc3 11. bxc3 Qd7 12. h4 Ne7 13. h5 h6 14. Rh3 Qc6 15. Nh4 Nd7 16. Qg4 Rg8 17. f4 O-O-O 18. f5 exf5 19. Nxf5 Nxf5 20. Bxf5 g6 21. hxg6 fxg6 22. Bxd7+ Rxd7 23. Bxh6 Kb8 24. Bf4 Ka8 25. Kf2 Rf7 26. Kg1 Qb6 27. e6 Re7 28. Re1 g5 29. Bxg5 Reg7 30. Re5 Bc6 31. e7 Qb1+ 32. Kh2 Ka7 33. a3 Qc2 34. Qh5 Be8 35. Qh4 Bd7 36. Rg3 Rh7 37. Bh6 Rgh8 38. e8=Q Bxe8 39. Re6 Bd7 40. Rf6 Bf5 41. Qg5 Be4 42. Rh3 Re8 43. Qg3 Bf5 44. Rh5 Bc8 45. Rxd5 Re6 46. Rxa5+ Kb6 47. Rxe6+ Bxe6 48. Rh5 Ka7 49. Qd6 Bc4 50. Qc5+ b6 51. Qxc4 Qg6 52. Rh3 Rxh6 53. Qc7+ Ka6 54. Qc8+ Ka7 55. Qd7+ Ka6 56. Qa4+ Kb7 57. Qd7+ Ka6 58. a4 Rxh3+ 59. Qxh3 Qd6+ 60. Kg1 Qd5 61. Qd3+ Ka7 62. c4 Qg5 63. d5 Qc1+ 64. Kf2 Qf4+ 65. Kg1 Qc1+ 66. Kh2 Qh6+ 67. Kg3 Qg5+ 68. Kf3 Qf6+ 69. Kg4 Qg7+ 70. Kf3 Qf6+ 71. Ke3 Qe5+ 72. Qe4 Qc3+ 73. Kf4 Qf6+ 74. Kg4 Qg7+ 75. Kh5 Qh8+ 76. Kg6 Qg8+ 77. Kf6 Qf8+ 78. Kg5 Qg7+ 79. Qg6 Qe5+ 80. Kh6 Qf4+ 81. Kh7 Qh4+ 82. Kg7 Qd4+ 83. Kf8 Qxc4 84. d6 Qxa4 85. Qf7+ Ka6 86. d7 Qb4+ 87. Qe7 Qf4+ 88. Ke8 Qa4 89. g4 Qc6 90. g5 Ka5 91. Kf8 Qf3+ 92. Qf6 Qa3+ 93. Kg7 1-0 (93) ♔osintseva,T (2483)-Ju,W (2568) ♗eijing 2014) 9. Bd2 Bxd2+ 10. Qxd2 a5 11. Nc3 Ba6 12. h4 Nc6 13. Qg5 Qxg5 14. hxg5 Nb4 15. Kd2 Nxc2 16. Kxc2 Ne7 17. Kd2 Rc8 18. Rhc1 Nc6 19. Na4 Ke7 20. Rc3 h6 21. gxh6 Rxh6 22. Nc5 Nb8 23. Rac1 Rg6 24. g3 Rc7 25. Nxa6 Rxc3 26. Rxc3 Nxa6 27. Rb3 Nb4 28. a3 Nc6 29. Rxb7+ Kd8 30. Rxf7 Kc8 31. Kc3 a4 32. Ne1 Rg4 33. Nc2 g5 34. Rg7 Kd8 35. Kd3 Kc8 36. Rh7 Kd8 37. Rh3 1-0

Feb-25-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  cro777: <Shams: While it definitely is a sideline, it is also true that a good number of masters and grandmasters have already played this variation with the black pieces. A grandmaster who uses it regularly is Serbia's Sinisa Drazic. Unfortunately our db doesn't have any games in this line with Drazic as Black.>

Be careful what you wish for because you just might get it!!

Feb-25-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Shams: <cro777> You're amazing. Do you play this line yourself?
Feb-25-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  cro777: <Shams> I haven't played this line. But I find it worthy to be analyzed. Langrock is a respectable author. As Watson pointed out, he has a knack for finding interesting and neglected variations.

At the moment, I plan to center on the most critical line:

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 c5 4. c3 Bd7 5. Nf3 a6 6. Bd3 cxd4 7. cxd4 Bb5 8.Bc2

Feb-26-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  moronovich: Hi´<Shams> !

I am glad you liked my Little contribution.

My mainweapon was sicilian,later spiced with the pirc/modern(what is life without a fianchetto ?;)and on few occasions the Caro Kann.But it is a fine memory you have because I played the Owens ten times and scoring well with it,70% vs 2350 opposition.The problem was I really,really,wanted to investigate if it was sound and concretely playable and as such spend endless hours analyzing it all from scratch(many errors in the proffesionels games,I tell you!),in the period from 76 to 96 roughly spoken.If it worked it could change a lot if there was one more answer to 1.e4 than the usual suspects.I once also had the privellege to analyze it with the master Tony Miles himself.That was more than great...Larsen told me there(1997) are 2 refutations.Miles and I saw one.

All in all I found it difficult to play something that wasn´t 100% sound, but then again I wasn´t 100% sure all the time;)So a thrilling approach it was.

See you around .

Feb-26-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: A solution for color blindness?: http://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/20...
Feb-27-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Domdaniel: <Shams> Your forum has attracted many superb comments lately and is fast becoming a key French resource.

My last four French games were all the Advance Var (before that I had a couple of KIAs, a Monte Carlo Exchange, and more Advances - does *nobody* play Nc3 or Nd2 anymore?)

But my only recent Advance loss came in the Advance Wade, where an aggressive player played *both* a4 and h4. One cramped my queenside and stopped the LSB exchange, the other went for my King.

It seemed strong at the time, but with the help of contributions here I'm working on an antidote.

And of course I share Moronovich's regard for the great Tony Miles. I had the satisfaction of playing 1.d4 e6 2.e4 d5 3.Nd2 b6 against him, and later seeing him use the line himself.

Feb-27-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Domdaniel: A curious thing: while the Wade Variation strongly appeals to me, and has been my main anti-Advance system for many years, I am not actually a dedicated enemy of Black's 'bad' Bishop. I don't believe in exchanging it at all costs, unless of course White's LSB is joining in a mating attack.

In fact I've found that the Black LSB often has very good chances in the long run. Its early support of e6 can be crucial, especially if Black plays ...f6. Or it can go to b7, a6, d7, c6, e8, etc etc -- even to h4.

PS. I like the sound of Langrock's book.

Feb-27-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  moronovich: <Or it can go to b7, a6, d7, c6, e8, etc etc -- even to h4.>

H4 !?!? You certainly know how to treat the french bishop ! With that touch of irish magic I would have you on my team anytime :)

Hope you are doing better <Dom> !?

Feb-27-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Domdaniel: <moronovich> Heh. Did you ever see a trick sometimes used by juniors? In this age of engine implants and Bigfoot Ivanov it's hard to call what those kids do 'cheating'...

Basically, it happens when an a- or h- pawn is in a pawn race. The opposing King is far away, but not so far it can be ignored. For his first move in this ending, White plays 1.a2-a4 (actually 1.a4 1/2 or a4.5!).

Black replies with, say, 1...f5. As he does so, at some suitable moment, White manages to nudge his pawn from a4-and-a-half on to a5. Next turn he plays a5-a6 and promotes first. Useful, I was told in Blitz/Bullet.

Anyway, the LSB ploy is similar. The Bishop can go c8-d7-e8-h5-and-a-bit, then slide to h4.

NB: Don't try this at home! (Save it for World Title Matches!)

Feb-27-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  moronovich: <Domdaniel> Hahah-those young pawnpushers ;)Invinsible ones were the whole world lay ahead of them and then why not speed it up a little !?

From my own record i recall a situation where one of my knights went from h4 to f2,delivering a nice check.Fortunately my opponent won that game.

Twice an opponent has left his king enprise.In the first case I asked silently"do you resign",which he duly did.In a position which was way beyond repair.

The other incident was a little more spicy.JH and I battled for the championship of our Club and had a very fine relation,on and off the board.On this crucial day and game he played the Rauzer and I played something ells.Around move 20 my position was worse than Titanic(after the iceberg).But as long as there is hope and wood...Suddenly,out of blue air he left his king en prise.And I still recall that special moment 2-3 seconds it took,before I deciced to simply snap it,giving Bb7 the finest moment of its career...He never recovered and I never forget how his face and voice turned into another colour. I have often asked myself if I did the right thing from an ethical point of view.But all in all Im ok with it and life is filled with grey areas with no fixed beforehand solutions.

Feb-28-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  cro777: <Domdaniel: A curious thing: while the Wade Variation strongly appeals to me, and has been my main anti-Advance system for many years, I am not actually a dedicated enemy of Black's 'bad' Bishop.>

Recently, the Euwe Variation has gained popularity, while John Nunn recommends Gurevich's preferred move order (which aims to activate the king's knight immediately).

1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.e5 c5 4.c3 Nc6 5.Nf3

The Euwe Variation (5...Bd7)


click for larger view

The "Gurevich" Variation (5...Nge7)


click for larger view

On the other hand, Black can prepare the light-squared bishop exchange with ...Qb6 (the Wade Variation 4...Qb6 5.Nf3 Bd7) or ...a6 (the "Wahls" Variation 4...Bd7 5.Nf3 a6).

Feb-28-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Shams: <cro> What (in brief!) is the advantage of Gurevich's move order?
Feb-28-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  cro777: In brief, 5...Nge7 cuts out the gambit lines and places the emphasis firmly on the middlegame.

The move 6.Bd3 is dangerous reply to both 5...Bd7 and 5...Qb6, but against 5...Nge7 it "just leads to a complex middlegame" (Nigel Davies). Also, by delaying ...Bd7, if White captures on f5, Black can play ...Be6 in one go.

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 c5 4. c3 Nc6 5. Nf3 Nge7 6. Bd3 cxd4 7. cxd4 Nf5 8. Bxf5 exf5 9. Nc3 Be6


click for larger view

Correction! This is Nigel Davies' (not John Nunn's) recommendation. The main idea behind Davies' course on building an opening repertoire is to adopt simple and solid lines for Black.

Mar-01-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  cro777: <Shams> It seems that you are also interested in the English Defense against the English Opening. Indeed, 1...b6 is a popular reply to 1.c4.

If White continues in the spirit of the English Opening (without a trasposition into the English Defense main line 1.c4 b6 2.d4 e6), according to the ChessPub Team (last updated February 8, 2015), the main line is

1. c4 b6 2. Nc3 Bb7 3. e4 e6 (3...e5 is also interesting) 4. Nf3 Bb4 5. Bd3 Ne7


click for larger view

6. 0-0 (6. Ne2 Ng6! 7. 0-0 0-0 8. Bc2 f5!) 0-0 7. Bc2 f5

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