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WoodPushkin
Member since Nov-03-13 · Last seen Oct-17-16
Greetings:

I am a class player who hopes to someday draw or beat a GM otb.

While I have always loved chess or at least since the age of three it wasn't until I played an elder named Baba Musa that I learned an important distinction.

You see he destroyed me three straight games. It was like I wasn't even moving pieces. Same 64 squares. Same pieces. Utter devastation! I was considered good up until that moment. That's when the difference ocurred to me as stated by American writer/humorist Samuel Langhorne "Mark Twain" Clemens: "The difference between the right word and the almost right word is really a large matter it's the difference between a lightning bug and the lightning."

Tuit, the difference between knowing the rules of chess and how to play are realities apart.

At that time I was playing 1000 elo chess.

As an eight year old child I'd read "Bobby Fischer Teaches Chess" which I reread when I decided I didn't want to suck at chess no more. But my first tome as an adult was 'Lasker's Manual of Chess'. Next came Tim Hardings, 'Better Chess For Average Players' which was followed by Jeremy Silman's 'Reassess Your Chess: Workbook'. All this helped improve my game but I still sucked maybe 1200 elo.

I then enrolled myself into my own life study college chess program for four years of intense learning. Okay so it took five years to complete. I studied Dvoretsky, Gelfer, Averbakh, Kotov, Fischer, Alekhine, and circa twenties Russian Masters amongst many other works. This put me at an expert level of chess where I reside today, working on my Masters degree at the School of Life's University, Hard Knock Campus.

While still studying from books and magazines I've added the internet to my classroom (Chessgames.com, ICC, Twitch and others) as well as computer analysis. I also practice against the computer programs at blitz chess (2'5"). I am currently battling ICC's Ling-Fong 2400 elo. I'm proud to say I've drawn it three straight games (during Wch match I played a game a day along w/ Carlsen and Anand); I guess the early draws were and inspiration for strong positional chess and it rubbed off on me. Still I'm no Bosislav Ivanov!!!! (10 straight Houdini and Rybka wins at GM level..?!? maybe); and perhaps neither is he.

My favorite players are Botvinik, Fischer and Kasparov. These world champs were all about studying and so am I. I also enjoy the positional fighting chess of Tal, Morozevich and Nakamura. Positive productive days to you.

JAH love

I run the GrandMaster Chess Academy (GCA) in Capital City, USA. This is a new organization begun in 2013 with the goal to promote serious study and improvement. Challenging a GM is just a motivational carrot.

GCA: Analysis, Calculation, Execution - Study!!!

JAH Love


   WoodPushkin has kibitzed 62 times to chessgames   [more...]
   Aug-25-14 Alekhine vs F H Terrill, 1926
 
WoodPushkin: Greetings: Great game by the future world champion. This was a maneuvering battle which Alekhine clearly won with a nice tactical finish. Terrill's move 10...b6 starts his problems. 10...a6 is much better. Study! Yes Love.
 
   Jul-12-14 Naiditsch vs Adams, 2014 (replies)
 
WoodPushkin: http://new.livestream.com/chess24/d... live coverage and dvr
 
   Jul-12-14 Potkin vs Kamsky, 2010 (replies)
 
WoodPushkin: Greetings: 14...Nxe4! Free pawns as the White queen has no safe squares to defend from. The real lesson here is that just because you get comboed on does not mean you have to give away the postion/game! An excerpt from a poem I wrote to teach my students how to think in a ...
 
   Feb-06-14 K Havasi vs Stahlberg, 1934 (replies)
 
WoodPushkin: Greetings: Whites seeming opposition is busted by Blacks g♙. This is oblique opposition and comes from a pawns square control ultimately pushing enemy king to a square where he is out of play. If White moves up Black gets behind enemy f♙. If White tries to hold ...
 
   Feb-05-14 Aronian vs Van Wely, 2014 (replies)
 
WoodPushkin: Greetings: <39...Bd4+> wins Queen and ultimately game. Analysis, Calculation, Execution: Study!! YES Love
 
   Feb-04-14 Karjakin vs Van Wely, 2013 (replies)
 
WoodPushkin: Greetings: Easy?!? I looked at this for seven minutes before I found <24.Bxf7+>. Did super GM van Wely see this coming? Also <25.Ne4!> followup control of d8-h4 diagonal to ultimately reach g5 is not obvious. Yes this is a good puzzle and the study of the moves ...
 
   Feb-03-14 Kiril D Georgiev vs Yu Yangyi, 2013 (replies)
 
WoodPushkin: Greetings: Not so easy. Took sum calculations to overstand why Qh4+ didn't work (perpetuals). This is why Analysis comes first. Save time! Georgiev's ♖ stops immediate checks by the Black queen. So the rook must stay and oh look a sacrifice puts the passed pawn into ...
 
   Feb-02-14 Carlsen vs Caruana, 2014 (replies)
 
WoodPushkin: Greetings: A solid game by both falls apart in the end game. Too bad for Caruana. What happened on move 38...Kb7?? On move 36...Ka8 Black avoids a pin and then walks back into it after 38.a5 Terrific finishing technique for Carlsen. Analysis, Calculation, Execution: Study Yes
 
   Feb-02-14 L Jiang vs M Barron, 2007 (replies)
 
WoodPushkin: Greetings: Classic example of gnoing a game and the moves associated w/ it but not understanding position. As such Jiang gives up two winning positions and loses a drawn game. Moves 12.Bxc6? <Nbd2 continuing development and putting the g4 knight to flight> and 13 failed ...
 
   Feb-02-14 Sokolsky vs Kotov, 1949 (replies)
 
WoodPushkin: Greetings: <1.Nxh6> is good enough as Rh8+ will follow and Sokolsky's ♕ attack continues against Blacks uncoordinated pieces and position. The final rook b7 is just plain 'ol sexy. Its really quite shocking to see Kotov play so poorly. For all their maneuvering both
 
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