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agb2002
Member since Jun-28-08 · Last seen Aug-23-16
I'm an applied mathematician who lives in the south east of Spain.

My approach to the puzzles is similar to that of David Zechiel (User: dzechiel): I first write the variations I find in a reasonable amount of time (using the puzzle diagram only) and post them before watching the game or other's comments. Then I have a look at them and try to be critical with my work. I apply the touch-move rule to my posts (see Unzicker vs Fischer, 1960). I hope to improve my tactical vision this way.

Often I cannot even spend a couple of minutes looking at the diagram (work, family, other interests, etc.) so I try to blind solve it along several breaks. My first attempt was R Vera vs S Garcia Martinez, 2001 and although the variations I found were not very deep I felt quite satisfied with the experience.

>> Click here to see agb2002's game collections.

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   agb2002 has kibitzed 3967 times to chessgames   [more...]
   Aug-23-16 Toldsepp vs Keres, 1934 (replies)
 
agb2002: Black is one pawn down. White is about to castle. Black has several options: -10... Nxf2, to keep the white king in the center. -10... Nxd3+, to deflect the white queen from the second rank. -10... Qxb2, to deflect the white queen from d3. ----- The simplest option seems to be
 
   Aug-22-16 agb2002 chessforum (replies)
 
agb2002: <Patriot: <agb2002> How are you taking moves back? If you are thinking ahead you have to sometimes reverse course.> I meant that when in a real game and in doubt if the chosen move eventually fails then it is not possible to go back and try any of the alternatives. ...
 
   Aug-22-16 K Burger vs Benko, 1969 (replies)
 
agb2002: The material is identical. The white queen prevents Qxg2#. Hence, 27... Ba6: A) 28.Qxa6 Qxg2#. B) 28.Bc4 Bxc4 wins. C) 28.Bd5 Qxd5 29.Ne3 Bxf1 30.Nxd5 exd5 31.Kxf1 Nd3 32.b3 Nxe5 - + [N+P] . ----- Much slower are 27... Nxg2, 27... Nxh3+ and 27... Qxg2+.
 
   Aug-21-16 Sutovsky vs A Giri, 2009 (replies)
 
agb2002: Black has the bishop pair and a pawn for a bishop and a knight. White threatens Rhd1, Nc3, etc. Black can further weaken the position of the white king with 26... Bxa3: A) 27.bxa3 b2+ 28.Kxb2 Qb3+ 29.Ka1 Qxa3+ 30.Kb1 Ba6 (30... Rb8+ 31.Bb6 Qb3+ 32.Ka1 Qxb6? 33.Qxb6 Rxb6 34.Rxc8+ + ...
 
   Aug-20-16 M N Sher vs J Pinski, 1996 (replies)
 
agb2002: The material is identical. Black threatens Nxe8 and Qxb3. The first idea that comes to mind is 28.Rxf8+ Kxf8 29.Bxd6+: A) 29... Kg8 30.Bxc5 A.1) 30... Ra8 31.Qe7 A.1.a) 31... Re6 32.Rd8+ Rxd8 (32... Kg7 33.Bd4+ wins -33... Kh6 34.Qh4#-) 33.Qxd8+ A.1.a.i) 33... Kg7 34.Bf8+ Kg8 ...
 
   Aug-19-16 Chiburdanidze vs M Sharif, 1995 (replies)
 
agb2002: <Patriot: <agb2002> You have some interesting defensive tries! Bg7, Re7, Kh7, and Qe6. I certainly did not think of those but I noticed you missed one defense that I found - Be6!> Yes, thank you! I thought I was nearly exhaustive... <This shows how hard it really is ...
 
   Aug-19-16 F Rakotomaharo vs A L'Ami, 2015 (replies)
 
agb2002: White has a knight for a bishop. Black threatens fxe5. White has 22.exf6, 22.f5, 22.Rd6, 22.Ng4. Most promising seems to be 22.f5, to get access to d5 and f5 and to try to pass the e-pawn: A) 22... exf5 23.exf6 (23.e6 also looks good) 23... Bf8 (23... Bxf6 24.Nd5+ wins the ...
 
   Aug-17-16 R Beer vs Grob, 1966 (replies)
 
agb2002: Black has a bishop and two pawns for a knight. White threatens Rxe5. The bishop aims at g2. This suggests 32... Rxf2: A) 33.Rxe5 Rxg2+ 34.Kh1 Rxd2+ A.1) 35.Rxd5 Rxf1#. A.2) 35.Kg1 Rxf1+ 36.Kxf1 Rxb2 37.Rxd5 (37.Re8+ Bg8 - + [B+4P] ) 37... c4 - + [4P] . For example, 38.Rxd7 h6 ...
 
   Aug-16-16 D Orzech vs N Popova, 2009 (replies)
 
agb2002: Black has a rook and a bishop for a queen. The queen stops 24... Rd1#. Therefore, 24... Rxc3: A) 25.Qxc3 Rd1#. B) 25.bxc3 Bxc3+ 26.Qxc3 (26.Qd2 Bxd2#) 26... Rd1#. C) 25.Qb1 Rcd3 and mate in three. D) 25.Qd2 Rxd2 26.Kxd2 Rd3+ - + [2B] . E) 25.Qxe2 Rc1+ 26.Qd1 Rc(d)xd1#. -----
 
   Aug-15-16 Yu Yangyi vs L Dominguez, 2015 (replies)
 
agb2002: <Patriot: <agb2002> Nice job! I have a question though. For move 29...?, you considered exd5, Qa7, and Qd8 in much detail. But why not consider 29...Bxd5? Isn't that a critical move?> Thank you! Yes, it is. I considered briefly 29... Bxd5 30.exd5 e5 31.Nf5 Qxe3 32.Rxe3,
 
(replies) indicates a reply to the comment.

Calculo, luego existo

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 8 OF 8 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Dec-04-13  LoveThatJoker: <Dear CG Friends>

I know this is irregular, but I am stepping outside of the box, for you to view truly one of the most exciting alternate solutions ever posted on the daily puzzle:

G Weissgerber vs A Van Nuess, 1933

With friendship, respect and gratitude for your time in looking at this,

LTJ

Mar-05-14  LIFE Master AJ: Hello:

Game Collection: "Chess-Games" >Problem of The Day< (2014)

I am trying to update a collection ... with all the puzzle for this year.

Have you missed any days this year ... that you know of? If so, could you help me to locate the missing days?

Mar-06-14  LIFE Master AJ: << Hello LMAJ, according to CG I have posted (or perpetrated) an analysis every day this year with the sole exception of Feb 17th (I don't remember what happened that day). If I can help you just let me know. >>

Cool! Then I will be looking through your posts and trying to update my collection. (I am glad that you don't mind.)

Think you could ask any of your friends and find out what the POTD for Feb. 17th was? (Ask them to leave a comment in my forum.)

Mar-08-14  LIFE Master AJ: S Williams vs The World, 2013

Weren't you a big-time member of the team?

Jun-21-14  Patriot: <agb2002> Thanks! I haven't been logging onto the site much recently--it's been about a week since the last time. I seem to be pulling away from chess more and more these days but that's how things go sometimes. Take care.
Sep-24-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: Yesterday in San Francisco CA.

Today in Lodi CA.

Sep-24-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  OhioChessFan: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fuq...
Sep-25-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: Now in Baltimore MD. About 10000 miles in three days.

<OCF> I didn't know that song by CCR.

Sep-26-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: Today in Milwaukee WI.

Impressive aerial night view of Chicago.

Sep-28-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: Good, energetic concert by The Black Keys yesterday in Chicago.

About to fly to Cleveland.

Sep-30-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: In Houston now.
Sep-30-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  OhioChessFan: Where in the world is agb2002?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ozY...

Oct-01-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: <OhioChessFan: Where in the world is agb2002?>

LOL. Tonight in Buffalo. Tomorrow in New York, London and back to Spain.

Business this time. Tourism next. Perhaps.

Oct-01-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  OhioChessFan: Shuffle Off to Buffalo- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_h0...

New York, New York- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=btF...

London Calling- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EfK...

Never Been to Spain- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TKS...

Dec-25-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  wordfunph: <agb2002> Merry Christmas!
Jan-01-15  CHESSTTCAMPS: <agb2002 from 12/26 POTD <Nice to see you again Phil!>>

Thanks. It's always nice to see you and your analysis, also!

Happy New Year!

Jan-02-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: Happy New Year to you and your family, Phil!
Jul-06-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Fusilli: Hola amigo! Como van los posibles planes de mudarse a la tierra del tio Sam?
Aug-19-16  Patriot: Hi <agb2002>! Just thought I would answer here...

<That's very true. Still the problem is how to differentiate between the essential and the superfluous?> I think this depends on the time remaining on the clock. Clock time remaining determines if you should be using "blitz logic" or "slow logic". In blitz, I would only focus on "scary" moves where someone could lose a piece. Moves that are purely defensive don't really count as worth considering because that takes too much time. But in a slow game, a defensive move could minimize an edge and therefore perhaps it was better to play a simple developing move. For example, if white had a 0.4 pawn advantage and started an attack which is easily defended then the advantage could go down to 0.1 whereas developing a knight would maintain the 0.4 evaluation. Therefore purely defensive moves could be considered a refutation.

Aug-20-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: <Patriot: Hi <agb2002>! Just thought I would answer here...>

Why not? You're more than welcome.

<<That's very true. Still the problem is how to differentiate between the essential and the superfluous?> I think this depends on the time remaining on the clock. Clock time remaining determines if you should be using "blitz logic" or "slow logic".>

I'm far more interested in the "slow logic" than in "blitz logic". The basic rationale is that one should learn to walk before trying to run (I mean any time control, not only blitz). However, just 'walking' proves to be incredibly difficult.

Another serious problem I have is that I tend to proceed in iterative ways (test and error) and this is not adequate in chess because one cannot take moves back.

Aug-20-16  Patriot: <agb2002> <I'm far more interested in the "slow logic" than in "blitz logic". The basic rationale is that one should learn to walk before trying to run (I mean any time control, not only blitz).> Absolutely! It's easier to adjust down--once you know how to analyze very well, you can trim that process in fast time controls.

<Another serious problem I have is that I tend to proceed in iterative ways (test and error) and this is not adequate in chess because one cannot take moves back.> I'm not exactly sure what you mean when you mentioned taking moves back. By iterative I assume you mean methodical as in an algorithm, testing each try. But the moves you consider are not random moves--they are usually critical and those are the ones you want to look at.

Aug-21-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: <<Another serious problem I have is that I tend to proceed in iterative ways (test and error) and this is not adequate in chess because one cannot take moves back.> I'm not exactly sure what you mean when you mentioned taking moves back.>

If I try to improve some details or features in the design of a machine, algorithm, data structure, etc. and the modification turns out to be a mistake I can undo it. However, we cannot take back a move in a real game.

You don't need to be a doctor to suffer some kind of "professional deformation".

<By iterative I assume you mean methodical as in an algorithm, testing each try.>

Yep. And error control is usually an essential part of many iterative algorithms. As long as one can reduce it below the prescribed tolerance in the long or preferably not so long run everything is ok.

In chess one should be accurate always and this makes an essential difference.

Aug-21-16  Patriot: <agb2002> How are you taking moves back? If you are thinking ahead you have to sometimes reverse course.

<In chess one should be accurate always and this makes an essential difference.> I think accuracy is needed whenever you have competing main candidates. But if a line is simply winning you don't have to be totally accurate.

Aug-22-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: <Patriot: <agb2002> How are you taking moves back? If you are thinking ahead you have to sometimes reverse course.>

I meant that when in a real game and in doubt if the chosen move eventually fails then it is not possible to go back and try any of the alternatives.

<<In chess one should be accurate always and this makes an essential difference.> I think accuracy is needed whenever you have competing main candidates. But if a line is simply winning you don't have to be totally accurate.>

Accuracy is important in every position, no matter whether one is about to start a combination, an attacking or defensive maneuver or a simplification to enter the endgame. For example, there can be some hidden details in that endgame which ruin the victory or even the draw.

However, an essential factor is energy. I normally prefer the (apparently) easiest, simplest and less energy demanding path than the shorter, more complex but more accurate alternatives, tipically chosen by engines.

Aug-23-16  Patriot: <agb2002> <I meant that when in a real game and in doubt if the chosen move eventually fails then it is not possible to go back and try any of the alternatives.> Ok, so you are saying you try a move to see what happens. Since I am usually playing no more than G/15, if I see an interesting try I spend a moment looking it over and if it looks interesting I play it.

<Accuracy is important in every position, no matter whether one is about to start a combination, an attacking or defensive maneuver or a simplification to enter the endgame. For example, there can be some hidden details in that endgame which ruin the victory or even the draw.> I disagree--accuracy is not important in every position. My Chess instructor (a master) teaches that all you need to do is prove a move is best (or even adequate) in a reasonable time. If a move is clearly best, it's a waste of time further proving it.

<However, an essential factor is energy. I normally prefer the (apparently) easiest, simplest and less energy demanding path than the shorter, more complex but more accurate alternatives, tipically chosen by engines.> I agree 100%! Computers won't miss a detail and get mated but human players can, no matter how good they are. Play for the easy and obvious win and your opponent will probably resign.

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