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ajile
Member since May-02-04 · Last seen Apr-16-14
World Team Research Forum

Analysis of Anti-1.b3 lines for Black.

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   ajile has kibitzed 9523 times to chessgames   [more...]
   Apr-13-14 J Moses vs O Cruz Filho, 1938 (replies)
 
ajile: Interesting. This line is known as the Karpov Variation and yet Karpov wasn't even born until 1951, 13 years later. ANATOLY KARPOV born May-23-1951) Russia
 
   Apr-09-14 Book vs Ingerslev, 1929 (replies)
 
ajile: demolished
 
   Apr-04-14 Odd Lie (replies)
 
ajile: <PinnedPiece: === Rules for Modern Living Part 17 === Allow wasps to build nests in your house.> lol
 
   Apr-04-14 Kramnik vs Svidler, 2014 (replies)
 
ajile: lol weak
 
   Apr-04-14 Bronstein vs Dark Thought, 1996 (replies)
 
ajile: This was before computers became strong. I doubt this same result happens much if at all nowadays.
 
   Mar-23-14 Anand vs Topalov, 2014 (replies)
 
ajile: Looks drawish now.
 
   Mar-21-14 Svidler vs Anand, 2014 (replies)
 
ajile: I think I would prefer e5 now to gain space. Then play the minority attack on the q-side with a3-b4 etc.
 
   Mar-21-14 Mamedyarov vs Svidler, 2014 (replies)
 
ajile: <perfidious: <ajile: <csmath: Svidler's opening is perfectly fine.> Really? How much you wanna bet he doesn't play it again in this tournament?> Nothing wrong with <csmath>'s statement, and if Svidler were to play the Leningrad Dutch again in this event-or not-it ...
 
   Mar-15-14 Aronian vs Mamedyarov, 2014 (replies)
 
ajile: White's whole game revolves around trapping Black's pieces at different times. Never seen a game quite like this. Brilliant.
 
   Mar-14-14 Topalov vs Anand, 2014 (replies)
 
ajile: <Petrosianic: <ajile>: <Amazing that this sloppy looking opening with Black going down a pawn early could be a relatively easy draw for Black.> Could be wrong, but I thought Black deliberately sacrificed a pawn for piece activity. I don't think Black was ever in much ...
 
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ajile's Forum

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 27 OF 27 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Sep-19-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  ajile: Another sample game which shows one possible result after White plays an early Bb5. But this move seems less good for White if Black can followup with ..Ne7. Is the exchange of bishop for knight really worth it if Black incurs no positional damage?

[Event "HOME2, Blitz:10'"]
[Site "zbestvalue"]
[Date "2013.09.19"]
[Round "2"]
[White "R-clone1"]
[Black "Rybka 3 32-bit"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "A01"]
[PlyCount "230"]

1. b3 e5 2. Bb2 Nc6 3. e3 Nge7 4. Bb5 d6 5. Nf3 g6 6. O-O Bg7 7. d4 O-O 8. Bxc6 Nxc6 9. d5 Nb4


click for larger view

10. a3 Na6 11. Nfd2 Qg5 12. Qe2 c6 13. e4 cxd5 14. exd5 Nc7 15. Nc3 b6 16. Nc4 Ba6 17. Rad1 Qe7 18. Na2 Bxc4 19. Qxc4 b5 20. Qe2 Qd7 21. Qe3 a5 22. f3 f5


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23. Nc3 Rfb8 24. a4 b4 25. Ne2 Ne8 26. f4 Nf6 27. fxe5 dxe5 28. h3 f4 29. Qf2 Ne4 30. Qf3 Nd6 31. Rb1 Nf5 32. Rf2 Qd6 33. c4 bxc3 34. Bxc3 Ne3 35. Be1 Qxd5 36. Qxd5+ Nxd5 37. Nc3 Nxc3 38. Bxc3 Rc8 39. Be1 h6 40. Re2 Kf7 41. b4 axb4 42. Rxb4 Bf8 43. Rb5 Bc5+ 44. Bf2 Bd6 45. a5 Rc4 46. Kf1 e4 47. Ra2 Rc1+ 48. Be1 f3 49. gxf3 Bg3 50. Rb7+ Kf6 51. Kg2 Bxe1 52. a6 exf3+ 53. Kxf3 Rc3+ 54. Kg2 Rg3+ 55. Kh2 Rd3 56. Rb6+ Kf5 57. Rb5+ Kf4 58. Rb6 Bg3+ 59. Kg2 Kf5 60. Ra5+ Be5 61. Rbb5 Re3 62. a7 Kf4 63. Rb4+ Re4 64. Rb7 Re2+ 65. Kf1 Rd2 66. Rf7+ Ke4 67. Re7 Rd5 68. Ra2 g5 69. Kf2 h5 70. Kg2 Rc5 71. Rh7 h4 72. Rd7 Kf5 73. Rb7 Bd4 74. Rd7 Rc4 75. Ra6 Rc2+ 76. Kh1 Rc1+ 77. Kg2 Rg1+ 78. Kh2 Rd1 79. Kg2 Rd2+ 80. Kf1 Rd3 81. Rf7+ Ke5 82. Re7+ Kd5 83. Rd7+ Ke4 84. Ra4 Ke5 85. Re7+ Kd6 86. Rf7 Ke6 87. Rc7 Rxa7 88. Rcxa7 Bxa7 89. Ra6+ Kf5 90. Ra5+ Ke4 91. Rxa7 Rxh3 92. Ra8 Rg3 93. Kf2 Rc3 94. Kg2 Kf4 95. Rf8+ Kg4 96. Rb8 h3+ 97. Kh2 Rc2+ 98. Kh1 Kh4 99. Rb7 Re2 100. Rb4+ g4 101. Kg1 Kg3 102. Rb3+ Kf4 103. Rb8 Kf3 104. Rf8+ Kg3 105. Rf1 Rc2 106. Rb1 Rc4 107. Ra1 Kh4 108. Kh1 g3 109. Rg1 Rf4 110. Rc1 h2 111. Kg2 Rf2+ 112. Kh1 Kh3 113. Rg1 hxg1=N 114. Kxg1 Rf8 115. Kh1 Rf1# 0-1

Sep-19-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  ajile: Alternate play for above game.

[Event "HOME2, Blitz:10'"]
[Site "zbestvalue"]
[Date "2013.09.19"]
[Round "2"]
[White "R-clone1"]
[Black "Rybka 3 32-bit"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "A01"]
[PlyCount "230"]

1. b3 e5 2. Bb2 Nc6 3. e3 Nge7 4. Bb5 d6 5. Nf3 g6 6. O-O Bg7 7. d4 O-O 8. Bxc6 Nxc6 9. d5 Nb4 10. a3 Na6 11.b4


click for larger view

White plays to stop Black from using c5 and to gain space on the queenside.

c5 12.dxc6 bxc6 13.c4


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White plays to try and stop ..d5 by Black. But as seen below Black is getting in ..d5 with good games.

Analysis by Rybka 3 32-bit : 23 ply

1. = (-0.13): 13...Qe7 14.Nbd2 Bb7 15.Qa4 Rfd8 16.Rfd1 c5 17.b5 Nc7 18.Qc2 e4 19.Bxg7 Kxg7 20.Ne1 d5 21.cxd5 Rxd5 22.a4 Rad8 23.Nc4

2. = (-0.13): 13...Bb7 14.Nbd2 Qe7 15.Qa4 Rfd8 16.Rfd1 c5 17.b5 Nc7 18.Qc2 e4 19.Bxg7 Kxg7 20.Ne1 d5 21.cxd5 Rxd5 22.a4 Rad8

Sep-19-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  ajile: Note also that there are other alternatives for Black to get a good game. For example in the above line Black could play the simple and good 11..f5 with a rock solid position.


click for larger view

Basically a Kings Indian (or Leningrad Dutch) setup with the ideal e5-f5 pawn duo. An important point though is White doesn't have pressure on the long h1-a8 diagonal because no fianchetto Bg2 bishop.

Oct-07-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  ajile: Reposted for reference:

Reverse Hedgehog White strategy examined. Both sides 0-0-0.

7.Bg2 Be7 8.d3 d5 9.h3 Be6 10.Ne2 Qd7 11.Ng3


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Analysis by Rybka 3 32-bit : 23 ply

1. (-0.46): 11...0-0-0 12.Nd2 h5 13.g5 Ne8 14.h4 f6 15.gxf6 gxf6 16.Qe2 Nb4 17.Nf3 Nd6 18.c3 Nc6 19.0-0-0 Kb8 20.Kb1


click for larger view

Black has a nice space advantage. We can work from this position to try and cramp him even more.

2. (-0.44): 11...g6 12.Nd2 0-0-0 13.Qe2 h5 14.g5 Nh7 15.h4 f6 16.gxf6 Bxf6 17.0-0-0 Qe7 18.Nf3 Kb8 19.e4 d4 20.Bh3 Bxh3 21.Rxh3 Nf8 22.Kb1 Ne6 23.Qf1 Nf4 24.Rh1

Oct-20-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  ajile: 11. Ne4 Nxe4 12. Bxe4 Bd5 13. Ng3 Bxe4 14.Nxe4 Qd7 15.Qf3 Nb4 16.0-0-0 Nxa2+ 17.Kb1 Nb4 18.Qf5 Nc6 19.f4 exf4 20.exd4 Qxf5 21.gxf5 0-0-0 22.Rdf1 Nxd4 23.Rxf4


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Analysis by Rybka 3 32-bit : 20 ply

1. (-0.65): 23...Rhe8 24.f6 gxf6 25.Nxf6 Ne2 26.Rf2 Bxf6 27.Rxf6 Rxd2 28.Rxf7 Re6 29.Rhf1


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Analysis by Rybka 3 32-bit : 20 ply

1. (-0.62): 29...b6 30.R1f6 Rxf6 31.Rxf6 Rd6 32.Rf8+ Rd8 33.Rf5 Rd1+ 34.Ka2

2. (-0.57): 29...b5 30.R1f6 Rd1+ 31.Ka2 Rxf6 32.Rxf6 Rd6 33.Rf8+ Kb7 34.Rh8 Rc6 35.Kb1 Rg6 36.Rh7 Re6 37.c4

Oct-20-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  ajile: Nxa2 variation with knight retreat to c6.

11. Ne4 Nxe4 12. Bxe4 Bd5 13. Ng3 Bxe4 14.Nxe4 Qd7 15.Qf3 Nb4 16.0-0-0 Nxa2+ 17.Kb1 Nb4 18.Qf5 Nc6

Black retreats the knight to shore up d4. Also Black doesn't mind 19.Qxd7 Kxd7 since this activates Black's king.

19.Qxd7 Kxd7 20.Rhf1 h5 21.f4 hxg4 22.hxg4 Rh4 23.fxe5 Rxg4 24.Nf2 Rh4 25.Rg1 g6 26.Ng4 dxe3 27.Nxe3 Re4 28.Rg3 Bh4 29.Rf3 Nxe5 30.Bxe5 Rxe5 31.Rxf7+ Re7 32.Rf4


click for larger view

This could be Black's best chance to win. Try to get to a position with pawns on both sides of the board.

A 3 to 2 pawn setup with all pawns on one side will more likely end in a draw.

Oct-20-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  ajile: Note: The 18.Qf5 Nc6 19.f4 line above is Tiggler's line where White doesn't exchange queens 19.Qxd7. Seems much harder to win.
Oct-21-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  kwid: Just delete it if not needed.

[Event "TWvsTB"]
[Site "Osoyoos"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "1"]
[White "Theory"]
[Black "Analysis"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "A01"]
[PlyCount "34"]

1. b3 $5 e5 2. Bb2 Nc6 3. e3 Nf6 4. Bb5 Bd6 $5 5. g4 a6 6. Bf1 h6 7. h3 Be7 8. Bg2 d5 9. Nc3 Be6 10. Nge2 d4 11. Ne4 h5 12. Nxf6+ (12. Ng5 Bc8 13. gxh5 Nxh5 14. h4 f6 15. Nf3 Qd6 16. d3 Bg4 17. Nh2 Bxe2 18. Qxe2 Qb4+ 19. Qd2 dxe3 20. fxe3 Qxh4+ 21. Qf2 Ng3) (12. exd4 Nxe4 13. Bxe4 Bd5 14. d3 hxg4 15. dxe5 Bxe4 16. dxe4 Rxh3 17. Rxh3 gxh3 18. Nf4 Bb4+ 19. Kf1 h2 20. Qh5 Qd2 21. Qxh2 O-O-O 22. Rc1 Bc3 23. Qh3+ Kb8 24. Qxc3 Qxf4 25. Re1 Rh8 26. Ke2 Qxe4+ 27. Kd1 Qf5 28. Qc5) 12... Bxf6 13. gxh5 (13. Bxc6+ bxc6 14. exd4 Qd5 15. Rg1 exd4 16. g5 Bxg5 17. c4 dxc3 18. Nxc3 Qa5 19. Ne4 Bh6 20. Qc2 O-O-O 21. O-O-O Rhg8 22. Kb1 Bxh3) (13. Ng3 hxg4 14. hxg4 Rxh1+ 15. Bxh1 Qd7 16. g5 Bxg5 17. Qh5 Bh6 18. Ne4 Qe7 19. Ng3 Qc5 20. O-O-O O-O-O) 13... Qd6 14. Ng3 O-O-O 15. Ne4 Qd5 16. c4 dxc3 17. Bxc3 Be7 1/2-1/2

Best regards,
kurt.

Dec-20-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  ajile: Reposted for reference.

RV's 25.Ka2 bxc4 line with 27.f3 instead of 27.c5.

27.f3 seems innocuous, possibly a waiting move but does prevent Black from playing an immediate Rc5.

25.Ka2 bxc4 26.bxc4 Rab8 27.f3


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Analysis by Rybka 3 32-bit : 21 ply

1. (-1.28): 27...Bb4 28.Bxb4 Nxb4+ 29.Ka3 Nc6 30.R6g2 Ne7 31.Ng3 a5 32.Nh5 Nxf5 33.e4 Nd4 34.Rxg7+ Rxg7 35.Rxg7+ Ke6


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Analysis by Rybka 3 32-bit : 21 ply

1. (-1.69): 36.f4 Kd6 37.fxe5+ Kxe5 38.Rd7 c6 39.c5 Nb3 40.Rxd3 Nxc5 41.Rc3 Nxe4 42.Rxc6


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Analysis by Rybka 3 32-bit : 20 ply

1. (-1.87): 42...Rd8 43.Ka4 Rxd2 44.Kxa5 Rh2 45.Kb4 Rxh3 46.Rb6 Rh4 47.Rb5+ Kd4


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Analysis by Rybka 3 32-bit : 20 ply

1. (-1.95): 48.Ra5 Rg4 49.Ra6 Rg2 50.Re6 Rf2 51.Re8 f5 52.Rd8+ Ke3


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Analysis by Rybka 3 32-bit :

1. (-2.54): 53.Re8 Kf3 54.Ng7 Ng3 55.Ne6 f4 56.Kc4 h5 57.Kd3 Rf1 58.Rf8 Kg4 59.Rg8+ Kh3 60.Ng5+ Kg2 61.Ne6 Kh2 62.Rh8

2. (-2.53): 53.Ng7 Ng3 54.Re8+ Kf3 55.Ne6 f4 56.Kc4 h5 57.Kd3 Rf1 58.Rf8 Kg4 59.Rg8+ Kh3 60.Ng5+ Kg2 61.Ne6 Kh2 62.Rh8

Evals continue to rise. This is most likely 0-1.

Dec-22-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  ajile: Reposted for reference.

Here is the position that bothers me that comes out of RV's line:

<<A4. 25...b4 26.Bb2 Na5 27.Ka2 Nb7 28.c6 Nd6 29.Nxd6+ Bxd6>

[-1.59] d=33 30.Kb1 a5 31.e4
h5 32.Rf1 Rad8 33.Kc1 Be7 34.Kb1 Bc5 35.f3 Rge8 36.Rc1 Bd6 37.Rg3 Ra8 38.Ka2 Rg8 39.f4 exf4 40.Rxd3 Rae8 41.Re1 g5 42.fxg6+ Rxg6 43.h4 Re6 44.Rd5 Rg2 45.Rxa5>
>

However 31..h5 seems to me like a nothing move. Let's try 31..Bc5 instead. The idea is to get White's rooks either undoubled or one rook off his first rank. Point being White can currently play Rc1 which can be annoying.

So we have

<A4. 25...b4 26.Bb2 Na5 27.Ka2 Nb7 28.c6 Nd6 29.Nxd6+ Bxd6>

[-1.59] d=33 30.Kb1 a5 31.e4 Bc5


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Here is the problem. 32.Rf1 and now whatever Black plays next White plays f3. For example 32.Rf1 Rad8 33.f3


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The critical position. So can White now simply leave the Rg6 preventing Black from moving the g7 pawn? Also White can rotate his rook to c1 to protect his c6 pawn also.

There are some advantages and disadvantage for both sides in this variation. White could have played 32.Rg2


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and kept the pressure on g7 forever. But then he can't hold the c6 pawn since there is no way to get a rook to c1.

The problem with 32.Rf1 is White can no longer easily double rooks on the g file. But he has the positive of being able to protect the c6 pawn.

These positions seem like the best for White since he protects his f5 pawn and e4 pawn and keeps the position mainly closed. I seriously dislike the computer lines (for White) that suggest White should play f4 opening the game.

So what can We do if White adopts this strategy? Can we get play on the a file? Unclear at the moment.

Dec-23-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  ajile: Reposted for reference.

Here is a typical position we have been looking at which shows one of White's ideas in the 25.c5 b4 26.Bb2 Na5 27.Ka2 Nb7 28.c6 Nd6 29.Nxd6 Bxd6 line.


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White to move. The idea is White maintains pressure on g7 in order to keep Black's pieces tied up. Black would like to be able to get the Rg8 out and then play ..Bf8. This would give Black better attacking opportunities on the q-side. One of the downsides of this line is after the trade White can then play e4 which is key to his defense. It allows the f5 pawn to be defended plus a lateral attack of d3 via rook to g3.

Black could try to win the c6 pawn but then White can win the d3 pawn in return (R6g3) so not clear if these lines give Black any lasting advantage. The other idea would be for Black to keep the rook on a8 and try to get something on the a file with ..a5 and ..a4.

Finally Black could try to trade bishops by moving the bishop to d4. But then we are trading our better bishop for his worse bishop.

Dec-24-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  WinKing: Merry Christmas & Happy Holidays <ajile>!
Dec-25-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  ajile: <WinKing:>

Thanks! You too!

Dec-25-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  ajile: Reposted for reference.

<for kb2ct:>

25. c5 b4 26. Bb2 Na5 27. Ka2 Nb7 28. c6 Nd6 29. Nxd6+ Bxd6 30. e4 Bc5 31. R1g2 a5 32. R6g3 Rad8 33. h4 h5 34. Rg6 Rd6 35. Kb1 Bd4 36.R6g3 Bxb2 37.Kxb2 Rxc6


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Analysis by Rybka 3 32-bit : 23 ply

1. (-1.39): 38...Rd6 39.Kc2 Rxd3 40.Kxd3 g6 41.fxg6+ Rxg6 42.Rxg6 Kxg6 43.Kc4 f5 44.f3 c6 45.Kc5 Kf6 46.d3 fxe4 47.fxe4 Ke7 48.Kc4 Kd7 49.d4 exd4 50.Kxd4 Kd6

2. (-0.50): 38...Ke7 39.Rdg3 Kf8 40.Rg1 Kf7 41.R3g2 Rd6 42.Kc2 Rd7 43.Rg3 Rd4 44.f3

http://www.jepflast.com/chesstree/w...

Next will analyze lines where White trades DSBs on d4. For example 36.Bxd4.

Dec-25-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  ajile: Reposted for reference.

<for kb2ct:>

25. c5 b4 26. Bb2 Na5 27. Ka2 Nb7 28. c6 Nd6 29. Nxd6+ Bxd6 30. e4 Bc5 31. R1g2 a5 32. R6g3 Rad8 33. h4 h5 34. Rg6 Rd6 35. Kb1 Bd4 36.R6g3 Bxb2 37.Kxb2 Rxc6

38.Rxd3


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Analysis by Rybka 3 32-bit : 23 ply

1. (-1.39): 38...Rd6 39.Kc2 Rxd3 40.Kxd3 g6 41.fxg6+ Rxg6 42.Rxg6 Kxg6 43.Kc4 f5 44.f3 c6 45.Kc5 Kf6 46.d3 fxe4 47.fxe4 Ke7 48.Kc4 Kd7 49.d4 exd4 50.Kxd4 Kd6

2. (-0.50): 38...Ke7 39.Rdg3 Kf8 40.Rg1 Kf7 41.R3g2 Rd6 42.Kc2 Rd7 43.Rg3 Rd4 44.f3

http://www.jepflast.com/chesstree/w...

Next will analyze lines where White trades DSBs on d4. For example 36.Bxd4.

Dec-25-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  ajile: Reposted for reference. White trades bishops with 36.Bxd4.

25. c5 b4 26. Bb2 Na5 27. Ka2 Nb7 28. c6 Nd6 29. Nxd6+ Bxd6 30. e4 Bc5 31. R1g2 a5 32. R6g3 Rad8 33. h4 h5 34. Rg6 Rd6 35. Kb1 Bd4

If White tries 36.Bxd4 it's very bad since he is losing another pawn without compensation. After 36..Rxd4 the e4 pawn hangs and if 37.f3 then the c6 pawn will fall.

36.Bxd4?


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Analysis by Rybka 3 32-bit : 21 ply

1. (-2.00): 36...Rxd4 37.f3 Rd6 38.R6g3 Rxc6 39.Rg1 Rc2 40.f4 Rxd2 41.fxe5 fxe5 42.Rc1 Rc2 43.Rxd3 Rxc1+ 44.Kxc1 Kf6 45.Rd7 g5 46.fxg6 Rxg6 47.Rh7 Rg3 48.Kb2 Re3 49.Rxh5 Rxe4 50.Rh6+

2. = (-0.24): 36...exd4 37.R6g3 Rxc6 38.Rxd3 Rd6 39.Rdg3 d3 40.Rg1 c5 41.Rc1 Re8 42.f3 Rc6 43.Kb2 a4 44.bxa4 c4 45.Rcg1 c3+ 46.Kc1

Dec-25-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  ajile: Knight Tour Line with 33.Rc1.

26. Bb2 Na5 27. Ka2 Nb7 28. c6 Nd6 29. Nxd6+ Bxd6 30. e4 Bc5 31.R6g2 Rad8 32.h4 h5 33.Rc1 Bb6


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Analysis by Rybka 3 32-bit : 20 ply

1. (-1.72): 34.Rf1 Rd6 35.f4 exf4 36.Rxf4 Re8 37.Rg3 a5 38.Kb1 Re7 39.e5 fxe5 40.Rc4 Re8 41.Rg5

2. (-1.90): 34.Rg6 Bxf2 35.Rh1 Rd6 36.Rh3 Rxc6 37.Rg2 Bc5 38.Rxd3 g5 39.fxg6+ Rxg6 40.Rd7+ Ke6 41.Rxg6 Kxd7 42.Kb1 Bf2 43.Rh6 Bxh4 44.Rxh5 Bf2 45.Rh8 Bb6 46.Ra8 Rd6 47.Kc2 a5 48.Rh8 Kc6

Dec-25-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  ajile: 26. Bb2 Na5 27. Ka2 Nb7 28. <Rc1> a5 29. <f3> a4 30. bxa4 Rxa4+ 31. Kb3 Raa8 32. Rcg1 Nxc5+ 33. Nxc5 Bxc5 34. Kc4


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Analysis by Rybka 3 32-bit : 21 ply

1. (-1.60): 34...Ra2 35.Kb3 Ra5 36.Kc4 Be7 37.Kxd3 Rd8+


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Analysis by Rybka 3 32-bit : 20 ply

1. (-1.67): 38.Ke2 Bf8 39.R6g4 Rc5 40.Rc1 Rxc1 41.Bxc1 h5 42.Rc4 Bd6 43.Kd3 Rg8 44.Rh4 g6 45.Bb2 gxf5


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Analysis by Rybka 3 32-bit : 20 ply

1. (-2.88): 46.Rxh5 Ke6 47.Rh6 c5 48.f4 Bf8 49.Rh7 Rg2 50.fxe5 fxe5 51.Bc1 Kd5 52.Kc2


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2. (-3.54): 46.Kc2 Rg3 47.Rxh5 Rxf3 48.Kd1 Kg6 49.Rh8 Kg7 50.Rh5 b3 51.h4 e4 52.Rg5+ Kf7 53.Rg1

Dec-27-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  ajile: Reposted for reference.

26. Bb2 Na5 27. Ka2 Nb7 28.h4 Nxc5 29.Nxc5 Bxc5 30.h5

Well I looked at the 30.h5 line and it looks like White will probably still lose. Although it takes time to see it.


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Analysis by Rybka 3 32-bit : 25 ply

1. (-1.72): 30...Be7 31.R6g4 a5 32.Rc1 c5 33.Ra1 Rgc8 34.Rc4 a4 35.Rac1 axb3+ 36.Kxb3


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And now White hopes to stall the position by simply moving his rooks back and forth.

But Black moves his king up to b5 and a rook to e8 to get this position:


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And now if White doesn't play e4 Black will and then the f5 pawn will fall (..Re5) and with it the game.

But if White plays 43.e4 then we get this position:


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43..Ra7 44.Rb1 Rea8 45.Rbc1 Ra2 46.f3 Bd6 and we reach this amazing position where White is in virtual zugzwang.


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0-1

Next will be checking to see if there is any way in this line for White to keep his rooks doubled forever on the g file. If White could do this then Black would have trouble getting the Rg8 out and playing ..Bf8.

Dec-28-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  ajile: Reposted for reference.

So far I can't find a way out for White if he tries to keep his rooks doubled on the g file. Black opens the a file with ..a5 and ..a4. Then if White does nothing Black moves his rook to c2 via a6 and c6.

Here is an extreme example of White doing everything possible to maintain the doubled rooks.


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Black has just played 39..Bc5 after playing 38..b3. Again this appears to be completely lost for White.

Analysis by Rybka 3 32-bit :

1. (-4.83): 40.Bc3 Ba3 41.Rg1 b2 42.Ka2 Bc5 43.Rb1 Ra8+ 44.Kb3 Rb8+ 45.Ka2 Bxe3 46.dxe3 Rxc3 47.Rxb2 Rxb2+ 48.Kxb2 d2 49.Rg1 Rxe3 50.Rd1 Re2 51.Kc2 Ke7 52.Rg1 g5 53.Rg4 Re3 54.Kxd2 Rxf3 55.Ra4

2. (-5.08): 40.Rg6 Bb4 41.Bc1 c5 42.R6g4 b2 43.Bxb2 Bxd2 44.Ka2 c4 45.Rxc4 Rxc4 46.Rxd2 Rd8 47.e4 Rc2 48.Rxc2 dxc2 49.Kb3 Rd3+ 50.Kxc2 Rxf3 51.Bc1 Rh3 52.Bd2 Rxh5 53.Kd3 Rh3+ 54.Ke2 h5 55.Be3

Jan-02-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  ajile: Reposted for reference.

<blue wave: Here is one of the draws from an engine match of 26 games. (24 black wins and 2 draws).

28.c6 Nd6 29.Nxd6 Bxd6 30.e4 a5 31.Kb1 Bc5 32.R1g2 h5 33.R6g3 Rad8 34.h4 Rd6 35.Rg6 Bb6 36.Ba1 Bd4 37.R6g3 Bxa1 38.Kxa1 Rd4 39.f3 Rd6 40.Kb1 Rxc6 41.Rg1 Rc2 42.R1g2 c5 43.f4 c4 44.bxc4 Rxc4 45.Rxd3 Rxe4 46.Rd7 Ke8 47.Ra7 exf4 48.Rf2 g5 49.fxg6 Rxg6 50.Rxa5 Re5 51.Ra4 Rg4 52.Rxb4 Rf5 53.Rb7 Rxh4>

Using a slightly more accurate move order we get to the same position minus ..h5. Note that ..h5 doesn't need to be played right away.

28.c6 Nd6 29.Nxd6 Bxd6 30.e4 Bc5 31.R1g2 a5 32.R6g3 Rad8


click for larger view

A critical position. White has maximized his position to:

1. Maintain pressure on g7 keeping Black's rook on g8.

2. Pressures Black's d3 pawn.

3. Protects the f2 pawn.

Continuing; White has a few moves left so let's proceed:

33.Kb1 h5 (covers the g4 square) 34.h4 Rd6

Another key point.


click for larger view

Any king move is instantly answered by 35..Rxc6 and Black ends up with a winning endgame.

For example 35.Ka2 Rxc6 36.Rxd3 Rd6

So what else can White do? 35.Rg6


click for larger view

Point being Black can't take the c6 pawn at the moment. 35..Rxc6? 36.Bxe5! and White is almost equalizing since the f6 pawn is pinned.


click for larger view

So Black simply plays 35..Bd4 and trades bishops.

36.R6g3 Bxb2 37.Kxb2


click for larger view

Analysis by Rybka 3 32-bit : 21 ply

1. (-1.31): 37...Rd4 38.Rg1 Rxe4 39.Rxd3 Rd4 40.Rxd4 exd4 41.Ra1 Ke7 42.Rxa5 Kd6 43.Kc2 Re8 44.Ra4 Re4 45.Kd3

2. (-1.05): 37...Rxc6 38.Rxd3 Rd6 39.Kc2 Rxd3 40.Kxd3 c6 41.Rg1 g6 42.fxg6+ Rxg6 43.Rh1 Ke6 44.f3 Kd6 45.Ra1 Rg3 46.Ke3 Rh3 47.Rxa5 Rxh4 48.Ra4 Kc5 49.Ra5+ Kb6 50.Ra4 c5 51.Ra8 Rh1

Have been continuing to search for alternate moves for White in the endgame but have found none that save him so far.

Jan-03-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  ajile: Reposted for reference.

29. Nxd6+ Bxd6

30. R1g3 <e4> 31. <R3g4>


click for larger view

Analysis by Rybka 3 32-bit : 24 ply

1. (-1.19): 31...Rab8 32.Rxe4 Rb5 33.Reg4 Rxf5 34.f4


click for larger view

Analysis by Rybka 3 32-bit : 21 ply

1. (-1.44): 34...Rc5 35.Bxf6 Rxc6 36.Bb2 Rc2 37.Rg2 Rxd2 38.Rxd2 Kxg6 39.Rxd3 Kf5


click for larger view

Analysis by Rybka 3 32-bit : 23 ply

1. (-1.53): 40.Rd4 g5 41.fxg5 Rxg5 42.h4 Rg4 43.Rd5+ Ke4 44.Rh5 Rg6 45.Bd4 c6 46.Kb2


click for larger view

Analysis by Rybka 3 32-bit : 21 ply

1. (-2.64): 46...Bf4 47.Kc2 Bxe3 48.Bxe3 Kxe3


click for larger view

Analysis by Rybka 3 32-bit : 21 ply

1. (-2.64): 49.Rf5 Rg2+ 50.Kc1 Rg4 51.h5 Rg1+ 52.Kc2 Rh1 53.Rc5 Rh2+ 54.Kc1 Kd3


click for larger view

Analysis by Rybka 3 32-bit : 22 ply

1. (-4.19): 55.Rf5 a5 56.Kb1 Kc3 57.Rf3+ Kd4 58.Rf5 Rh4 59.Rf6 Rxh5

2. (-4.19): 55.Kb1 a5 56.Rf5 Kc3 57.Rf3+ Kd4 58.Rf5 Rh4 59.Rf6 Rxh5

Jan-03-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  ajile: Reposted for reference.

<DaringSpeculator>

29. Nxd6+ Bxd6 30. R1g3 <e4> 31. <R3g4> Rab8 32.Rxe4 Rb5 33.Reg4 Rxf5 34.f4 Be7

Might be better since it negates White playing the Bxf6 variation.


click for larger view

Analysis by Rybka 3 32-bit : 21 ply

2. (-1.22): 34...Be7 35.Rg2 Rc5 36.e4 Rxc6 37.e5 Rb6 38.R6g3 g5 39.Kb1 f5 40.Rxd3 Ke6 41.Rf3 Rb5 42.d3 c6 43.Kc2 Rc5+ 44.Kd2 Rd5

This was Rybka's second choice but it's only 21 ply.

Jan-03-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  ajile: Reposted for reference.

Update:

29. Nxd6+ Bxd6 30. R1g3 <e4> 31. <R3g4> Rab8 32.Rxe4 Rb5 33.Reg4 Rxf5 34.f4 Be7

Doesn't seem to be working as well. So far I have this position with Black only 1 pawn up:

Black to move:


click for larger view

Analysis by Rybka 3 32-bit : 21 ply

1. (-1.07): 44...Ke6 45.Rd4 c5 46.Rh4 Kd5 47.Kc2 Rg6 48.Rf4 a5 49.Rf5+ Kd4 50.Rf8 Rg5 51.h4 Rg4 52.Rd8+ Ke5 53.Re8+ Kd5

2. (-1.07): 44...Rd6 45.Rf3+ Ke6 46.Re3+ Kd5 47.Re7 c5 48.Kc2 Re6 49.Rd7+ Kc6 50.Ra7 Kb5 51.Rb7+ Rb6 52.Rd7

Jan-05-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  ajile: Reposted for reference.

28.c6 Nd6 29. Nxd6+ Bxd6 30.e4 Bc5 31.Rc1

It's actually an interesting line and has some pitfalls for Black.


click for larger view

http://www.jepflast.com/chesstree/w...

30. e4 Bc5 31. Rc1 Bxf2 32. Rg4 <g5? computer move> 33. fxg6+ Rxg6 34. Rf1!


click for larger view

Black has to play 34..Bd4 and ends up with doubled d pawns. White remains a pawn down but has liquidated his doubled f pawn.

http://www.jepflast.com/chesstree/w...

An important lesson to always check the computer lines.

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