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alexmagnus
Member since Dec-06-04 · Last seen Oct-20-19
Hobby player (rated 1634).

If you feel misunderstood, feel free to say it.

My favourite players are: Magnus Carlsen, Kateryna Alexandrovna Lagno and Hanna-Marie Klek!

The domination list, based on the peak rating distance to the #10 player (official lists only, distance 50+ needed to "qualify"):

Kasparov 175 Jan 90
Fischer 160 Jul 72
Karpov 130 Jan 89
Carlsen 123 Mar 14
Kramnik 110 Jan 98
Tal 105 Jan 80
Ivanchuk 105 Jul 91
Anand 105 Jul 98
Korchnoi 95 Jan 80
Topalov 84 Jul 06
Caruana 80 Oct 14
Aronian 72 Mar 14
Spassky 70 Jan 71
Shirov 65 Jul 94
Gelfand 60 Jan 91
Kamsky 60 Jan 96 Jul 96
Morozevich 57 Jul 99
Portisch 55 Jan 80
Jussupow 55 Jul 86
Timman 55 Jan 90
So 53 Feb 17
Adams 52 Oct 00
Mamedyarov 52 Nov 18 Dec 18
Ding 51 Nov 18
Bareev 50 Jul 91
Vachier-Lagrave 50 Aug 16

#1 record distances to #2 (no qualification hurdle):

Fischer 125 (1972)
Kasparov 82 (January 2000)
Carlsen 74 (October 2013)
Karpov 65 (January 1982)
Topalov 34 (July 2006, October 2006)
Anand 23 (July 2007)

Women's "domination list" since July 2000:

J. Polgar 248 (April 2007)
Hou 160 (December 2015, February 2019)
Humpy 114 (October 2007)
S. Polgar 96 (January 2005)
Xie 92 (January 2005)
Ju 92 (August 2019)
A. Muzychuk 82 (August 2012)
Stefanova 76 (January 2003)
Goryachkina 68 (October 2019)
Galliamova 65 (January 2001)
Zhao 64 (September 2013)
Kosteniuk 58 (July 2006)
Lagno 58 (February 2019)
Chiburdanidze 57 (October 2000)
Cramling 56 (April 2007)
T. Kosintseva 56 (November 2010)
Zhu 52 (April 2007)
M. Muzychuk 52 (June 2019)
N. Kosintseva 51 (November 2010)

Earliest Soviet championship with living players: USSR Championship (1948) (Averbakh)

Earliest Interzonal with living players: Stockholm Interzonal (1952) (Averbakh, Matanovic)

Earliest Candidates with living players: Zurich Candidates (1953) (Averbakh)

Earliest WC match with living players: Petrosian - Spassky World Championship Match (1966) (Spassky)

Earliest WC match with living winner: Petrosian - Spassky World Championship Match (1969) (Spassky)

Earliest WC match with both players living: Karpov - Kasparov World Championship Match (1984/85)

>> Click here to see alexmagnus's game collections.

Chessgames.com Full Member

   alexmagnus has kibitzed 10936 times to chessgames   [more...]
   Oct-20-19 Grand Swiss IoM (2019) (replies)
 
alexmagnus: Anton is leading the race so far. Number 39 seed. And people complain about KO being random :D. No World Cup produced such a low seed winner (the lowest was 11 - Karjakin and Kamsky), and even not FIDE WC of 1999-2004 (the lowest was 36 - Khalifman).
 
   Oct-09-19 World Cup (2019) (replies)
 
alexmagnus: <- a Finnish Jew> Botvinnik's birthplace belonged to the Russian Empire when he was born (as Finland was not yet independent), then to Finland, then to the Soviet Union (and within it, to Russia) - it is on that small piece of land that the USSR gained in the Winter War (I ...
 
   Oct-02-19 alexmagnus chessforum (replies)
 
alexmagnus: How he gained that much? Well, first, being below 2300 and aged below 18 gives you a K-factor of 40. Second... Well, as I said, in August he was rated 2033, then this happened: September: 2 events, 171 points gained: 3/8 (+1 -2 =5) against a 2230 average (TPR of 2141 with my ...
 
   Sep-09-19 Magnus Carlsen (replies)
 
alexmagnus: <He had won his previous 10 tie-break play-offs in major contests dating back to 2007.> Yup. Before losing that tie-break to Ding, his last TB loss was the Candidate match against Aronian in 2007. But it is a bit worrying that sudenly MC finds himself as number 4 in Blitz. ...
 
   Sep-05-19 Garry Kasparov (replies)
 
alexmagnus: <(Tal missed one cycle, the one won by Fischer)> And that one he missed for health reasons. Tal and Petrosian never retired and took chess seriously and professionally always. Korchnoi was similar, and it seems Anand goes the same path. Kasparov? He is not coming for ...
 
   Aug-27-19 Pal Benko (replies)
 
alexmagnus: At death Benko was the second oldest living chess grandmaster and second oldest living Candidate. The new top 3 for grandmasters is Averbakh, Matanovic, Krogius. The new top 3 for Candidates is Averbakh, Ivkov, Olafsson.
 
   Aug-20-19 Viswanathan Anand (replies)
 
alexmagnus: Are* if*
 
   Aug-08-19 Abu Dhabi Masters (2019) (replies)
 
alexmagnus: < Apparently, Kramnik's retirement was not to be taken all too literally and seriously.> When Kramnik retired he said that he will still play rapid or blitz events. But not longer classical.
 
   Aug-07-19 Ju Wenjun (replies)
 
alexmagnus: <She speaks English fluently which is not often with Chinese people.> The young generation in China speaks English actually quite well.
 
   Aug-03-19 Baadur Aleksandrovich Jobava (replies)
 
alexmagnus: http://ratings.fide.com/id.phtml?ev... That's quite a rating chart... What happened?
 
(replies) indicates a reply to the comment.

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 42 OF 42 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Aug-20-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  diceman: While not exactly the same,
(player results vs tournament results)

I was able to find a you-tube video
with the top 15 snooker player century breaks by date:

Jan 1975:

Top 5: 67.84%
Mid 5: 23.62%
Low 5: 8.54%

You can see that players 11 through 15
contributed almost nothing compared
to the top 5.

Fast forward to,

Jan 2019:

Top 5: 46.55%
Mid 5: 28.05%
Low 5: 25.40%

The lower players contribute enough to
lower the contribution of the top players.
(My guess is top players flat-line like
elite Grandmaster ratings)

I would imagine this weighting also
happened in the World Championships,
because it's the top players who would qualify.

This is probably due to more money, more interest, and more international players entering the game.

Aug-25-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  alexmagnus: <diceman>

That doesn't explain the fact that the player with most centuries today scores nearly as many centuries as the entire chapionship did in the 1980s (the record for most centuries in a world championship by a single player is 16, set by Stephen Hendry in 2002. That's more than the overall number of centuries in each championship before 1985 save for 1983, which had 18 overall centuries - and the 20 mark wasn't surpassed until 1991).

Sep-01-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: September 2019

Post-Communist (except USSR/China)
1. Rapport 2752
2. Wojtaszek 2739
3. Topalov 2736
4. Duda 2730
5. Navara 2724
6. Le 2708
7. Almasi 2687
(Rausis 2685*)
8. Leko 2670
9-10 Laznica 2667
9-10 Saric 2667
*Rausis publicly admitted cheating and is under investigation.

Latin America:
1. Cori 2676
2-3. Bruzon Batista 2644
2-3. Granda Zuniga 2644
4-5. Bachmann 2633
4-5.Mareco 2633
6. Iturrizaga Bonelli 2626
7. Delgado Ramirez 2615
8. Cordova 2610
9. Leitao 2606
10. Flores 2602

Nordic/Baltic:
1. Carlsen 2876
2. Grandelius 2691
3. Kovalenko 2674
4. Hammer 2635
5. Tari 2630
6. Nielsen 2617
7. Andersen 2603
8. Hellers 2601
9. Agrest 2583
10. Neiksans 2577

Middle East:
1. Firouzja 2702
2. Amin 2699
3. Gelfand 2686
4. Rodshtein 2684
5. Salem 2675
6. Maghsoodloo 2664
7. Nabaty 2658
8. Ipatov 2650
9. Sutovsky 2643
10. Tabatabaei 2642

Old Guard:
1. Anand 2765
2. Kramnik 2753
3. Topalov 2736
4. Svidler 2729
5. Adams 2694
6. Sadler 2692
7. Almasi 2687
8-9. Gelfand 2686
8-9. Ivanchuk 2686
10. Kamsky 2685
(Rausis 2685)*

Sep-01-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: I have decided not to do the Alpine category this month. Reasons:

- It's a lot of work.

- I doubt the list has a lot of fans. Most of the players are under 2600.

- Depending on how Brexit proceeds, in the future we may include Switzerland in some kind of "semi-EU" list with the UK and Norway.

I was also planning to kill the "Superstitions" category, but changed my mind after getting all the responses last month. It turns out there really are fans! I'll post a new superstition below.

Sep-01-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  alexmagnus: I add my usual ones:

European Union:

1. Giri 2780
2. Vachier-Lagrave 2774
3. Rapport 2752
4. Wojtaszek 2739
5. Topalov 2736
6. Duda 2730
7. Navara 2724
8-9. Adams 2694
8-9. Howell 2694
10. Sadler 2692

Former Soviet Union:

1. Nepomniachtchi 2776
2. Mamedyarov 2767
3. Karjakin 2760
4. Grischuk 2759
5-6. Aronian 2758
5-6. Radjabov 2758
7. Kramnik 2753
8. Artemiev 2746
9. Andreikin 2741
10. Vitiugov 2732

Former British Empire:

1. Caruana 2812
2. So 2767
3. Anand 2765
4. Dominguez 2763
5. Harikrishna 2746
6. Nakamura 2745
7. Vidit 2718
8. Xiong 2707
9. Shankland 2705
10. Amin 2699

Asia:

1. Ding 2811
2. Anand 2765
3. Yu 2763
4. Harikrishna 2746
5. Wang Hao 2726
6-7. Wei 2721
6-7. Bu 2721
8. Vidit 2718
9. Le 2708
10. Firouzja 2702

Born later than the world champion:

1. Caruana 2812
2. Ding 2811
3. Giri 2780
4. So 2767
5. Yu 2763
6. Rapport 2752
7. Artemiev 2746
8. Duda 2730
9. Wei 2721
10. Vidit 2718

Nuclear powers:

1. Caruana 2812
2. Ding 2811
3. Nepomniachtchi 2776
4. Vachier-Lagrave 2774
5. So 2767
6. Anand 2765
7-8. Yu 2763
7-8. Dominguez 2763
9. Karjakin 2760
10. Grischuk 2759

Sep-01-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: Superstition of the month: Awesome Alliteration

Gioachino Greco! Adolf Anderssen! Alexander A. Alekhine! Richard Reti!

Throughout chess history, great GMs with alliterative appellations have enlightened us with excellent examples of the execution of... oh, forget it, here's the list.

To be eligible, a player must have first given name starting with the same letter as surname (or the equivalent in the player's culture).

1. Yu, Yangyi 2763*
2. Rapport, Richard 2752
3. Matlakov, Maxim 2716
4. Shankland, Sam 2705
5. Dubov, Daniil 2699
6-7. Areshchenko, Alexander 2675
6-7. Salem, Saleh 2675
8. Sjugirov, Sanan 2662
9-10. Guseinov, Gadir 2654
9-10. Sevian, Samuel 2654

* Earns the A.A. Alekhine triple alliteration bonus (Yu, Yang, Yi).

Honorable mentions:
Le, Quang Liem 2708: Near miss - the second part of the given name alliterates with the surname.

Sethuraman Panayappan Sethuraman 2624: If he ever makes the top 10 alliteratives, he earns the Alexander Alexandrovich Alekhine "name based on patronymic" bonus.

Sep-01-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: Does anyone here understand how Vietnamese names work?

A quick check on wikipedia tells me that the order is surname, middle name, given name, in which case Le, Quang Liem should be number 4 on my list.

Sep-01-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: On a little further research, I'm convinced that Liem is Le's given name. Here is the corrected Awesome Alliteration list.

1. Yu, Yangyi 2763
2. Rapport, Richard 2752
3. Matlakov, Maxim 2716
4. Le, Quang Liem 2708
5. Shankland, Sam 2705
6. Dubov, Daniil 2699
7-8. Areshchenko, Alexander 2675
7-8. Salem, Saleh 2675
9. Sjugirov, Sanan 2662
10-11. Guseinov, Gadir 2654
10-11. Sevian, Samuel 2654

Sep-02-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  alexmagnus: <beatgiant>

Yu is not the only triple alliteration in your list. Dubov is another one (Daniil Dmitrievich).

Sep-02-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: <alexmagnus>
You're right, Dubov earns the triple alliteration bonus too. I didn't know that, and the FIDE list I used didn't show it.

Thanks. I stand corrected.

Sep-30-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  alexmagnus: October:

European Union:

1. Giri 2780
2. Vachier-Lagrave 2774
3. Rapport 2752
4. Wojtaszek 2748
5. Topalov 2736
6. Duda 2734
7. Navara 2717
8-10. Vallejo 2694
8-10. Adams 2694
8-10. Howell 2694

Former Soviet Union:

1. Nepomniachtchi 2776
2. Mamedyarov 2767
3. Karjakin 2760
4. Grischuk 2759
5-6. Aronian 2758
5-6. Radjabov 2758
7. Kramnik 2753
8. Artemiev 2746
9. Andreikin 2741
10. Vitiugov 2732

Former British Empire:

1. Caruana 2812
2. So 2767
3. Anand 2765
4. Dominguez 2763
5. Harikrishna 2748
6. Nakamura 2745
7. Vidit 2718
8. Xiong 2708
9. Shankland 2705
10. Amin 2699

Asia:

1. Ding 2811
2. Anand 2765
3. Yu 2763
4. Harikrishna 2748
5. Wang 2726
6-7. Bu 2721
6-7. Wei 2721
8. Vidit 2718
9. Le 2708
10. Firouzja 2702

Born later than the world champion:

1. Caruana 2812
2. Ding 2811
3. Giri 2780
4. So 2767
5. Yu 2763
6. Rapport 2752
7. Artemiev 2746
8. Duda 2734
9. Wei 2721
10. Vidit 2718

Nuclear powers:

1. Caruana 2812
2. Ding 2811
3. Nepomniachtchi 2776
4. Vachier-Lagrave 2774
5. So 2767
6. Anand 2765
7-8. Dominguez 2763
7-8. Yu 2763
9. Karjakin 2760
10. Grischuk 2759

Sep-30-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: Post-Communist (ex. USSR, China):

1. Rapport 2752
2. Wojtaszek 2748
3. Topalov 2736
4. Duda 2734
5. Navara 2717
6. Le 2708
7. Almasi 2687
(Rausis 2685* cheating scandal)
8. Leko 2670
9-11. Berkes 2667
9-11. Laznica 2667
9-11. Saric 2667

Latin America

1. Cori 2671
2-3. Bruzon Batista 2644
2-3. Granda Zuniga 2644
4. Mareco 2634
5-6. Bachman 2629
5-6. Iturrizaga Bonelli 2629
7. Delgado Ramirez 2615
8-9. Flores 2606
8-9. Leitao 2606
10. Martinez Alcantara 2602

Sep-30-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: Old Guard:

1. Anand 2765
2. Kramink 2753
3. Topalov 2736
4. Svidler 2729
5. Adams 2694
6. Sadler 2692
7. Almasi 2687
8-9: Gelfand 2686
8-9: Ivanchuk 2686
10. Kamsky 2685
(Rausis 2685*)

Sep-30-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: <alexmagnus>
While updating my "old guard" list, I noticed that there were no changes at all since the previous month, although the FIDE site claims these are for October. I'm wondering if there is some snafu with FIDE's new site.

Meanwhile, I'll publish my superstition of the month (which is a lot easier than some of these regional lists).

Sep-30-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: Superstition of the month: Rhyming Rivals

First, a tip of the chess bishop's mitre to User: LameJokes, who posted a joke that inspired this idea.

For each of the top 10 players, I look for the highest ranked player whose name rhymes with that player's. These players constitute the "top 10 players in poetry."

Definitions:
If the name is one syllable (Ding, So) then a rhyme means a name ending phonetically with the same final vowel+consonant combination (-ing, -o)

Otherwise, a rhyme means a name having the same final syllable phonetically.

1. Carlsen 2876 - Nielsen 2617

2. Caruana 2812 - Harikrishna 2748

3. Ding 2811 - Mecking 2553

4. Giri 2780 - Cori 2671

5. Nepomniachtchi 2776 - Qi 2435* (*Depending on how it's pronounced, Manolache 2548 might be a better answer)

6. Vachier-Lagrave 2774 - Vaibhav 2597

7-8. Mamedyarov 2767 - Shirov 2664

7-8. So 2767 - Jakovenko 2681

9. Anand 2765 - Shankland 2705

10-11. Dominguez Perez 2763 - Quesada Perez, Yu. 2615

10-11. Yu 2763 - Bu 2721** (**the original rhyming pair suggested by User: LameJokes)

Sep-30-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: I found a better rhyme for Nepomniachtchi: Valsecchi 2504
Oct-01-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  alexmagnus: <While updating my "old guard" list, I noticed that there were no changes at all since the previous month, although the FIDE site claims these are for October.>

There were very little changes as most players prepared for the World Cup (which itself will be rated for November).

But the list did change. I see it by the number 100 player. The number 100 in September were some two players sharing 100-101 with 2653. On the October list there are numbers 97-100 having 2654.

Oct-01-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: <alexmagnus>
Thanks. In that case, I'll share something new I've been tinkering with: a "wunderkinds" list.

By looking at the top ratings at young age levels, I came up with a very simple-minded definition of a "wunderkind": 2200 by age 8, 2250 by age 9, 2300 by age 10, etc. raising the cutoff 50 rating points per year.

I then defined a "wunderkind index" to measure by how much a wunderkind exceeds the above age cutoffs:

(rating - 2200)/50*(Age - 7)
Thus for example, if a player is 2230 at age 8, the wunderkind index is 30/50 = 0.6.

I generated a list based on this, which I will post below. But, I don't promise to do this every month, because it took me a few advanced queries (like birth year >= X and rating >= Y) and I couldn't think of an easier way to create this list.

Oct-01-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: Wunderkinds (age based on 2019 minus year of birth, criteria as in previous post)

1. Firouzja: age 16, rating 2702, index 102/50 = 2.04

2. Mishra: age 10, rating 2387, index 87/50 = 1.74

3. Gukesh: age 13, rating 2520, index 70/50 = 1.4

4. Praggnanandhaa: age 14, rating 2567, index 67/50 = 1.34

5. Nihal: age 15, rating 2610, index 60/50 = 1.2

6. Abdusattorov: age 15, rating 2608, index 58/50 = 1.16

7. Bai: age 12, rating 2430, index 30/50 = 0.6

8. Bharath: age 12, rating 2417, index 17/50 = 0.34

9. Maurizzi: age 12, rating 2415, index 15/50 = 0.3

I found only these 9 who met my cutoffs.

Obviously the process for generating this list is much more error-prone than my usual lists, so I look forward to all the corrections.

Oct-01-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: I probably expressed the wunderkind index formula wrong, but the idea is basically index = (rating minus cutoff for age level)/50 and I hope that's clear from the examples.

Of course, we've all probably heard of several of those kids before. The biggest surprise for me was Adelard Bai, who at age 12 is already the #2 player in his federation (Chinese Taipei) and playing on its Olympiad team, although I never heard of him before and there's no kibitzing on his player page.

Chess fans in Taiwan, wake up!

Oct-02-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  alexmagnus: That Wunderkind index is a very nice idea!
Oct-02-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  alexmagnus: <. The biggest surprise for me was Adelard Bai, who at age 12 is already the #2 player in his federation (Chinese Taipei) and playing on its Olympiad team, although I never heard of him>

He was not even close to meeting your cutoff before the very recent rating list. In September he was still rated 2204, and in August even 2033 (though it was not his peak, his pre-August peak was 2113).

Oct-02-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  alexmagnus: How he gained that much? Well, first, being below 2300 and aged below 18 gives you a K-factor of 40.

Second... Well, as I said, in August he was rated 2033, then this happened:

September: 2 events, 171 points gained:

3/8 (+1 -2 =5) against a 2230 average (TPR of 2141 with my formula)

5.5/9 (+4 -2 =3) against a 2232 average (TPR 2311)

October: 2 events, 226 points gained

4.5/8 (+2 -1 =5) against 2225 average (TPR 2269)

5/9 (+1 -0 =8, that's a rare score at this age and level!) against 2281 average (TPR 2320)

So, due to the high K factor he is somewhat overrated (but if he keeps progressing like this, his rating becomes justified very soon. Also, note that his K factor will now fall to 10 due to exceeding 2400).

Oct-02-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: <alexmagnus>
Thanks. Yes, ratings of these young players can change rapidly, so I should probably revisit this list after some time.

But who is this Abhimanyu Mishra? Not only haven't I heard of him, but I don't find a player page or any games by him on chessgames.com.

And yes, maybe he's overrated at 2387, but who cares? He's 10 years old! His rating has increased steadily and rapidly from around 1700 in July 2017.

I looked him up in the US Chess Federation and learned that is US rating is 2379 and he lives in New Jersey.

Oct-02-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: An article about Mishra, calling him the youngest US master ever.

https://new.uschess.org/kids/abhima...

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