chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

 
Chessgames.com User Profile

kenilworthian
Member since Feb-17-09 · Last seen Feb-20-18
http://kenilworthian.blogspot.com/
>> Click here to see kenilworthian's game collections.

Chessgames.com Full Member

   kenilworthian has kibitzed 50 times to chessgames   [more...]
   Jan-09-18 Gelfand vs Adams, 1994
 
kenilworthian: If 19...Nb6 then White wins with 20.Nb5 Qd7 21.Be6! and the Black Queen runs out of squares, which will cost him a piece.
 
   Dec-28-17 A Tzermiadianos vs S A Iuldachev, 2012
 
kenilworthian: etter 15.Nf3 =/ ⩲ according to Collins.
 
   Dec-27-17 T L Petrosian vs Navara, 2007
 
kenilworthian: Sam Collins suggests 17.Qc3! ⩲
 
   Dec-27-17 Hector vs D Semcesen, 2012
 
kenilworthian: 17.Qb3! Bosch
 
   Dec-27-17 Hector vs I Sokolov, 2013
 
kenilworthian: Better was 13.Ne4 Bxa2 14.Rxa2 Nd5 15.b4 ⩲ Bosch.
 
   Nov-24-17 R Akesson vs J L Hammer, 2015
 
kenilworthian: This is the right move order for Black, avoiding the complications of O-O-O. Here, for instance, 9.Qd4 can be met with either: a) 9...Bd6!? 10.f4 Ng6 11.O-O (11.Qxg7? e5!) 11...e5!= [Raetsky] or b) 9...Nc6 10.Qxc4 exd5 and Bb4+ tends toward equality
 
   Nov-24-17 W Klimm vs I Schneider, 2006
 
kenilworthian: I like 10...Qh4+! to weaken the kingside, but Black can also consider 10...Bd6!? 11.Be3 Qh4+ 12.Bf2 Qh6 13.Bc4 O-O-O as in Brigden - Miles, Bristol 1982 or 10...Bc5 11,Bf4 e5! as in Scheffer - Curdo, Maine 1975.
 
   Nov-24-17 Viktor Friesen vs Z Andriasian, 2015
 
kenilworthian: White can probably still hold things together with 23.Rce1 instead of 23.Rxd3?
 
   Nov-23-17 E Berg vs I Sokolov, 2001
 
kenilworthian: Rasmussen - Jessen, Copenhagen 2002, continued instead 14. Qe3 d4 15. Qxh6 dxc3 16. Re5 Bf5 17. Rxf5 Ng4 18. Rg5+ Bxg5 19. Qh7#
 
   Nov-22-17 S Grover vs Sai Nirupama Kotepalli, 2017
 
kenilworthian: Despite the terrible error at the end, the game actually represents good play by White -- up until the terrible error at the end. Obviously White had a clear advantage with the much better pawns, safer King, better development, and the two Bishops in an open position.... And ...
 

You are not logged in to chessgames.com.
If you need an account, register now;
it's quick, anonymous, and free!
If you already have an account, click here to sign-in.

View another user profile:
  


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | contact us
Copyright 2001-2018, Chessgames Services LLC