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sfm
Member since Mar-25-05 · Last seen Jan-30-15
I was born in Denmark in 1960. From I was 16 to 23 chess was my life, nothing else mattered. Young people with total dedication will learn. So did I. My rating grew to about 2200, and the performance rating in my last participation in the Danish team tournament was 2365. Then, in 1983, I decided to drop the game completely. Chess had become too dominating, too absorbing. Should a man really allow himself to devote so much of his life to chess, a game so limited in itself?

After a hard thinking I said "no", and never participated in another tournament.

But I miss the drama and the excitement, something I never found to the same extent elsewhere. Also, the great feeling of excellence did not return. Finally, there were the many friends you got.

Chess is still a minor addiction, which I fight. No chess software on my PC and online play-chess sites are firewalled.

Chessgames.com Full Member

   sfm has kibitzed 1538 times to chessgames   [more...]
   Jan-22-15 M Cebalo vs Vasiukov, 2014
 
sfm: The less pretty 12.Nd5+ also wins, using just one more move to mate, after -,cxN 13.Qxd5,Qe8(or g8) 14.Qxd6+,Qe6 15.QxQ#
 
   Jan-18-15 Soltis vs J Tamargo, 1976
 
sfm: On an orbituary https://groups.google.com/forum/#!t... Sam Sloan writes ...his most famous win was against Grandmaster Andy Soltis, who is now the chess columnist for the New York Post. In the 1976 Marshall Chess Club Championship, Tamargo had the tournament of his life, winning ...
 
   Jan-06-15 Beliavsky vs Christiansen, 1987
 
sfm: <goodevans: What takes the shine off this swindle for me is the magnitude of the blunder.> Right. This is 'the unsubtle swindle of the century'. A simple explanation would of course be extreme time pressure, so close to the 40 moves after a very hard fight.
 
   Jan-04-15 V Ciocaltea vs L Masic, 1971 (replies)
 
sfm: Black could have fought on longer with 25.-,Kg7 26.Tf7++,KxN 27.Be3+,g5 28.RxQ,RxR 29.h4 Two pawn down the result should be the same, but there is still a fight to put up.
 
   Dec-25-14 Reshevsky vs Fischer, 1970 (replies)
 
sfm: What a shocker! Did White think he was the one that was making threats on the f-file? Well, realities turned out a little different. As <rookfile> points out below, it is not 27.Qd7 but 28.Kg1?? that loses the game. Quite a blunder for a GM, but we are all so wise afterwards.
 
   Dec-25-14 P Horvath vs T Stoll, 2004 (replies)
 
sfm: <TheFocus: I like 29.Ng4+ Kg7 30.Re7+ Qd4 31.Qxgd4+ Kg8 32.Nh6 mate> Indeed likeable, but there is also 29.-,BxN
 
   Dec-17-14 L Barden vs J Penrose, 1959 (replies)
 
sfm: <Phony Benoni: I never promised you a Penrose garden.> :-) Well spotted - though real many players here will not get it. Too young! The song in question was one of my favorites in - '73! Thanks for reminding me of it. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WO4...
 
   Dec-16-14 Wisuwat Teerapabpaisit
 
sfm: Chess is immensely popular in Thailand (and elsewhere in SE Asia), but it is not European chess, though very close. This little fact obscures the talent mass. http://timkr.home.xs4all.nl/chess/m...
 
   Dec-16-14 T Farley vs W Teerapabpaisit, 2004 (replies)
 
sfm: <greed and death: 39. Bxg7+ Rxg7 40. Qd8+ (a) 40... Rg8 41. Qd4+ Rg7 42. Qxg7#> LOL, that is also what I had - until I realized that there is also 42.Rxg8 mate. Black has sort of "enough" coverage on g8 - but the white queen is standing in the way.
 
   Dec-15-14 Larsen vs Ivkov, 1967 (replies)
 
sfm: Black probably can't win after 33.-,NxN 34.KxN,Kf6 - and winning is what he wants. In Larsen's words: "To win, you must take the risk of losing." So that's what Black did here.
 
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