chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

 
Chessgames.com User Profile Chessforum

twinlark
Member since Nov-17-05
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

My wrap of our Chessgames Challenge: The World vs A Nickel, 2006 against ICCF Grandmaster Arno Nickel is at User: World Team Tribute.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

<The lyf so short, the craft so long to lerne.>

― Geoffrey Chaucer, The Parliament of Birds

>> Click here to see twinlark's game collections.

Chessgames.com Full Member

   twinlark has kibitzed 17899 times to chessgames   [more...]
   Feb-24-17 twinlark chessforum (replies)
 
twinlark: <saffuna> <Usually when I read the phrase "deep state" in an article, it's a prelude to paranoid ravings, either from the left or the right.> I wish you were right. But many powerful factions within the state are entrenched and largely unaccountable. For example, the ...
 
(replies) indicates a reply to the comment.

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 336 OF 336 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Feb-21-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  diceman: Saw a Documentary yesterday about Trump winning the election.

It was hillarious to see liar media in action, "knowing" the result. Particularly the parts about Trump, "rejecting" the results.

Arent we lucky the tolerent lost!

Funny thing was, all Trump all the time, didnt seem any different than the news today.

Feb-21-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  WannaBe: Think we saw the same documentary, it's from Showtime, and pieced together from their show 'The Circus'...
Feb-21-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  WannaBe: Milo Y. have resigned from Breitbart

http://money.cnn.com/2017/02/21/med...

Feb-22-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  diceman: <WannaBe: Think we saw the same documentary, it's from Showtime, and pieced together from their show 'The Circus'..>

Yup, the channel was free over the hoilday weekend.

Feb-22-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  twinlark: <diceman>

<I was expecting, log cabin, Jacquard loom, butter churn, hunting for dinner, and washing clothes in the stream.>

As well as posting these messages via carrier pigeons.

Feb-23-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  diceman: <Mexico Doesnít Want Illegal Immigrants Deported Home-They Donít Want To Support Them >

You cant make this stuff up.

What's wrong with America?

Feb-23-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  OhioChessFan: <vbd: I believe that the unnatural carbon output by humanity into the atmosphere should be ideally stopped. We don't exactly know what the ultimate consequences would be.>

We don't know that we'll need every bit of global warming we can get right now if another Ice Age is on the way.

Feb-23-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  visayanbraindoctor: <twinlark: <The safest way to do that is through fourth generation nuclear plants, maximizing the construction of geothermal plants and hydroelectric plants.>

Solar and wind are also useful. Photovoltaic technology is infintely more viable than it was even a decade ago. Our house has 8 solar panels on the roof which produces electricity for the city grid. Our first electricity bill after three months with five adults in the spring was a <credit> of nearly $50. This is a house that uses 5 computers (4 towers, 6 monitors, a lap top), an electric dishwasher, electric washing machine, electric oven and microwave, television, central heating, electric lights, etc).

Many houses use many more solar panels than we do and are bordering on self sufficient or net vendors of electricity to the city grid. The State of South Australia is over 50% self sufficient in renewables, while the Australian Capital Territory plans to be fully self sufficient in household electricity by 2020. We have large solar farms being installed in waste land (downwind from the city dumps for example) that are each supplying power to the grid sufficient to power thousands of houses.>

I missed mentioning these. This is good news for those advocating alternative energy.

Reason why I mentioned geothermal and hydroelectric first is that in my country, there are lots of volcanic activity and floods.

The advantage of solar and wind is that they can be set up virtually anywhere.

Feb-23-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  visayanbraindoctor: <OhioChessFan: <vbd: I believe that the unnatural carbon output by humanity into the atmosphere should be ideally stopped. We don't exactly know what the ultimate consequences would be.>

We don't know that we'll need every bit of global warming we can get right now if another Ice Age is on the way.>

Now that you mention it, in the 1970s, it was thought that we might be entering a global cooling period. I talked about this several scrolls up; that human CO2 production may have averted an incoming ice age; but this is merely speculation.

There is a natural cycle to this phenomena. When an ice age occurs, large tracts of sea and land are covered by ice. In these places, photosynthetic activity stops. CO2 accumulates from background volcanic activity. The increase in CO2 causes global warming. The ice melts. Plants begin to cover the previous ice deserts in a global greening. Atmospheric CO2 increase is checked and eventually falls.

At least that's how the theory goes.

I have mentioned above that this negative feedback mechanism may already have kicked in. The most recent findings based on satellite mapping have shown that the world's greenery has increased by 20% since the 1980s.

Another study has indicated that Arctic photosynthesis has significantly increased. (As far as I can tell the number of polar bears and walruses, apex predators of the Arctic whose numbers would surely fall if its ecosystem's productivity decreases significantly, are actually increasing; notwithstanding the oft repeated tale that they are becoming extinct.)

There have bene other studies that indicate:

1. that plants are growing a bit faster than they were previously. (Then again every every horticulturist knows that increasing CO2 level in a greenhouse triggers faster plant growth.)

2. that in already previously green areas, the density of plant material has increased.

3. that O2 atmospheric level is not falling as fast as it theoretically calculated it should be, based on the amount of fossil fuels burned. (This means that something is probably outputting massive amounts of oxygen into the air; which is most likely to be photosynthetic plants. A small proportion of the world's plants always get buried in anaerobic conditions somewhere, and this represents a net O2 outflux.)

The above studies gives me reason to be optimistic. The negative feedback explained above is probably at work.

However why tempt nature? The amount of CO2 humans have dumped into the atmosphere is probably the geological equivalent to a major bolide strike on a large coal deposit. Or a period of staggering volcanic activity.

Feb-23-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  visayanbraindoctor: <Putin: 4,000 Russians fighting with militants in Syria>

https://www.almasdarnews.com/articl...

For Russia, the act of containing jihadist activity in Syria is a matter of national security. The same is to a lesser extent true in any region with a significant number of native Muslim population, such the rest of the Middle east, north Africa, Western China, the Indian subcontinent, and Archipelagic SE Asia. The logic is inevitable. A fifth of the Muslim population is deeply religious enough to believe in the literal interpretation of the Koran's violent orthograde commands; and maybe ten percent of this is willing to carry those passages out if given the financial, logistical, and personal support. Unfortunately we are in an era wherein such support is being given in some places in the world. Unless this support is stopped, there will be a never ending flow of jihadists blowing things up.

I will say this even if it's politically incorrect. If the Sunni population of the US or Europe, or Australia grows to about 5%, expect recurring bombings and shootings done by individuals recruited by the support mechanism mentioned above, targeting 'apostates' and 'idolaters'. This is already the reality in the regions mentioned in the paragraph above for hundreds of years. The phenomenon has always existed in Islamic history. Unfortunately, recently it has significantly increased thanks to US and UK foreign policy that precisely takes advantage of this phenomenon. If this continues, I am pessimistic enough to think that one day, a particularly radicalized Wahabbi influenced group will manage to get its hands on a nuclear bomb, and given their ideology, will use it on perceived enemies (with cities in Iran, Israel, Europe, and USA probably as the most likely targets.)

I say specifically Sunni, because historically, the last time a Kharijite like group (which is what Wahabbis are) existed among Shiites was in the middle ages, in the form of the Assassins. Such groups have rarely or never existed among Alawites/Alevis, Ahmaddiyas, and Sufis.

Feb-24-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  twinlark: <saffuna>

You might be interested in the following treatise on the "deep state":

http://www.strategic-culture.org/ne...

Feb-24-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  saffuna: Interesting. But when the author starts out b referring to journalists Martha Raddatz, Peter Bergen and Jeremy Scahill as agents of the deep state, it loses me altogether. Usually when I read the phrase "deep state" in an article, it's a prelude to paranoid ravings, either from the left or the right.
Feb-24-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  diceman: <twinlark: <saffuna>

You might be interested in the following treatise on the "deep state":>

The problem with these things is, it
gives these folks way more credit than they deserve.

Reminds me of the George Bush "controlled demolition" on 9/11.

Journalist=intelligent, is like politician=intelligent.

Nice theory, little evidence of it.

Feb-24-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  visayanbraindoctor: Why isn't the <deep state> just described as <influential factions in a country's leadership>?

I usually use the latter term. It's more cogent. The former is vague.

<diceman: Reminds me of the George Bush "controlled demolition" on 9/11.>

I watched the videos. The collapse of the twin towers does look like controlled demolition.

There was also another building that collapsed in the same way, even though no plane hit it.

These undeniable objective facts should be explained more fully. I think there should be further investigation on 9-11.

Feb-24-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  diceman: <visayanbraindoctor:

I watched the videos. The collapse of the twin towers does look like controlled demolition.>

Have you ever seen the twin towers collapse in an, "uncontrolled" demolition, for an A/B comparison?

<There was also another building that collapsed in the same way, even though no plane hit it.>

Is there video, or just someone "saying" it collapsed the same way?

We would probably also need an official
description of "the same way."

Just think of the "logic" of controlled
demolition on the "other" buildings.

Average Americian: "I was Ok with it
when the twin towers fell, but when building 5 collapsed, I lost it!"

I dont think most Americans knew there was anything else there, but the twin towers.

I was googling to see what size the other building were, and came across this:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...

Feb-24-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  twinlark: <diceman>

Anyone who believes the official narrative is ignoring some obvious evidence, including the fact that Building 7 was not even mentioned at any stage in the official 911 Commission Report. A strange omission one would think.

Plane crashes on land leave wreckage. The destruction of the wreckage within the collapse of buildings 1 and 2 is explicable, given the size of these buildings utterly dwarfed the planes that hit them. And also complicated by the fact that the crime scene was extensively tampered with virtually from day one, with the debris being removed with insane celerity before investigators could sift through the rubble.

Some of the larger issues that trouble my mind and evoke scepticism is that building 7 collapsed in controlled demolition style purportedly because of fires, which is unlikely. Also, the wreckages of the Pennsylvania and Pentagon planes were never displayed. Try looking at google images of all the famous airliner crashes in history and you'll usually find plenty of evidence in the form of large aircraft fragments, such as the cabin, large sections of the fuselage, engines, tail fins etc.

Search google for the remains of the planes that hit the Pentagon and Flight 93 in Pennsylvania. Nothing to see there. Also, where is all the surveillance footage from around the Pentagon that would have been rolling at the time? Unless of course the Pentagon had no surveillance cameras on its grounds...not too likely I would think.

Any one of the conundrums is acceptable by itself, but there are too many unique issues clustered into the one event of 911.

There are still plenty of questions to be answered, the above being the tip of the iceberg.

There was a conspiracy, that is an absolute fact known and endorsed universally. Where the controversy arises is who the movers and shakers of the conspiracy were.

Feb-24-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Colonel Mortimer: <diceman> <I was googling to see what size the other building were, and came across this:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...

Otherwise known as the official conspiracy theory, or 'unofficial' as it happens - because the 9/11 commission didn't explain how building 7 collapsed into its own footprint at free fall speed. The commission 'report' didn't even acknowledge the existence of building 7.

If you want the truth go here..

http://www.ae911truth.org/about.html

Architects & Engineers for 9/11 Truth - all 2,801 of them

Feb-24-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  twinlark: <saffuna>

<Usually when I read the phrase "deep state" in an article, it's a prelude to paranoid ravings, either from the left or the right.>

I wish you were right. But many powerful factions within the state are entrenched and largely unaccountable. For example, the huge, well funded intelligence organisations that are overtly trying to bring Trump down.

The musical chairs between the corporate sector and public service entrenches corporate influence such that regulatory capture is a regular feature of the US bureaucracy rather than an anomaly. It's a problem that all countries face, but the stakes in the US are higher than elsewhere so the competition for control or influence over regulators at all levels of governance is vicious and entrenched.

Trump has installed any number of oligarchs to head up his agencies, and this is causing a great deal of friction within the US with other heavyweight corporate players. It's a civil war within the state, with the previously hidden or discreet elements now coming out in the open to battle with the new administration. It is not about freedom, or democracy, or workers' rights or any progressive agenda, it is fight between competing factions of the ruling class as far as I can see.

Trump wants to do things a bit differently, especially abroad where his main powers can be expressed. He wants some sort of accommodation with Russia, cooperation to finish off ISIS, and fewer military adventures abroad. This is not playing well with the arms and energy lobbies, which presumably have the largest share of commodity use and exports in your country and are <intent on continuing to expand their profits in their highly profitable businesses>, even at the expense of more millions of lives.

All that blood and treasure is squandered for corporate gain and influence, and it would be better used domestically, which is I think Trump's core meta-policy in "making America great again". If I were a US citizen/resident, I would have absolutely no faith that Trump would use these resources for the benefit of all, but that is another issue. He is clearly catering to the big end of town, but alas for him, not to the biggest players.

It's about interests. The most influential lobbies in a country will not give up their privileges or see their interests as they see them damaged without a huge fight.

Feb-25-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Colonel Mortimer: <saffuna> <Usually when I read the phrase "deep state" in an article>

You don't need to read about it in an article, you can witness it first hand in declassified US gov documents.

Feb-25-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  diceman: <twinlark:

The destruction of the wreckage within the collapse of buildings 1 and 2 is explicable, given the size of these buildings utterly dwarfed the planes that hit them.>

So 1 and 2 were, "real?"

<And also complicated by the fact that the crime scene was extensively tampered with virtually from day one, with the debris being removed with insane celerity before investigators could sift through the rubble.>

What's known as:

"looking for survivors?"

<Some of the larger issues that trouble my mind and evoke scepticism is that building 7 collapsed in controlled demolition style>

Any video?

Feb-25-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  diceman: <Colonel Mortimer:

The commission 'report' didn't even acknowledge the existence of building 7.>

A most clumsy attempt at "cover-up" with CM on the case.

That "could" suggest why its details
weren't in the report.

Feb-25-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Colonel Mortimer: It was too hard for 911 commission to explain the collapse - probably because it looks like a textbook controlled demolition. Here's the video evidence..

https://youtu.be/Mamvq7LWqRU

Feb-25-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  diceman: <twinlark:

Trump wants to do things a bit differently, especially abroad where his main powers can be expressed. He wants some sort of accommodation with Russia, cooperation to finish off ISIS, and fewer military adventures abroad. This is not playing well with the arms and energy lobbies, which presumably have the largest share of commodity use and exports in your country and are <intent on continuing to expand their profits in their highly profitable businesses>, even at the expense of more millions of lives.>

Any theories why Obama didnt start "bunches" of wars?

For folks who "want" hot wars, he spent most of his time under Putin's shoe.

Feb-25-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  diceman: <diceman:
<twinlark:

The destruction of the wreckage within the collapse of buildings 1 and 2 is explicable, given the size of these buildings utterly dwarfed the planes that hit them.>

So 1 and 2 were, "real?">

I'm guessing twin meant, "inexplicable."

Feb-25-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Colonel Mortimer: <diceman> <Any theories why Obama didnt start "bunches" of wars?

For folks who "want" hot wars, he spent most of his time under Putin's shoe.>

Sounds like you spent most of your time under your bed during Obama's reign..

Obama was a prolific bomber and bombed more countries than Bush, 7 muslim countries to be exact.

<America dropped 26,171 bombs in 2016. What a bloody end to Obama's reign>

https://www.theguardian.com/comment...

Jump to page #    (enter # from 1 to 336)
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 336 OF 336 ·  Later Kibitzing>

from the Chessgames Store
NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, totally anonymous, and 100% free--plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, or duplicating posts.
  3. No personal attacks against other members.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No posting personal information of members.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform an administrator.


NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific user and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, you might try the Kibitzer's Café.
Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors.

You are not logged in to chessgames.com.
If you need an account, register now;
it's quick, anonymous, and free!
If you already have an account, click here to sign-in.

View another user profile:
  


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | advertising | contact us
Copyright 2001-2017, Chessgames Services LLC