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Karpov 
Photo copyright © 2006 by Milan Kovacs (www.milankovacs.com)  
Anatoly Karpov
Number of games in database: 3,551
Years covered: 1961 to 2014
Last FIDE rating: 2628 (2630 rapid, 2644 blitz)
Highest rating achieved in database: 2780
Overall record: +970 -228 =1299 (64.9%)*
   * Overall winning percentage = (wins+draws/2) / total games
      Based on games in the database; may be incomplete.
      1054 exhibition games, odds games, etc. are excluded from this statistic.

MOST PLAYED OPENINGS
With the White pieces:
 Sicilian (250) 
    B92 B81 B24 B44 B84
 King's Indian (184) 
    E60 E62 E81 E71 E63
 Queen's Indian (146) 
    E15 E17 E12 E16 E19
 Ruy Lopez (135) 
    C95 C82 C84 C92 C80
 Queen's Gambit Declined (113) 
    D37 D30 D35 D38 D31
 Grunfeld (98) 
    D85 D73 D97 D78 D87
With the Black pieces:
 Caro-Kann (273) 
    B17 B12 B10 B14 B18
 Queen's Indian (241) 
    E15 E12 E17 E19 E14
 Ruy Lopez (175) 
    C92 C95 C69 C77 C98
 Nimzo Indian (160) 
    E32 E54 E21 E53 E42
 Ruy Lopez, Closed (137) 
    C92 C95 C98 C93 C86
 Sicilian (92) 
    B46 B40 B44 B47 B42
Repertoire Explorer

NOTABLE GAMES: [what is this?]
   Karpov vs Topalov, 1994 1-0
   Karpov vs Kasparov, 1984 1-0
   Karpov vs Unzicker, 1974 1-0
   Karpov vs Korchnoi, 1974 1-0
   Kasparov vs Karpov, 1984 0-1
   Karpov vs Topalov, 1994 1-0
   Timman vs Karpov, 1979 0-1
   Karpov vs Kasparov, 1985 1-0
   Karpov vs Gulko, 1996 1-0
   Karpov vs Kasparov, 1984 1-0

WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS: [what is this?]
   Karpov - Korchnoi World Championship Match (1978)
   Karpov - Korchnoi World Championship Rematch (1981)
   Karpov - Kasparov World Championship Match (1984)
   Karpov - Kasparov World Championship Match (1985)
   Karpov - Kasparov World Championship Rematch (1986)
   Kasparov - Karpov World Championship Match (1987)
   Kasparov - Karpov World Championship Match (1990)
   Karpov - Timman FIDE World Championship (1993)
   Karpov - Kamsky FIDE World Championship (1996)
   Karpov - Anand World Championship Match (1998)
   FIDE World Championship Knockout Tournament (2001)

NOTABLE TOURNAMENTS: [what is this?]
   Hastings 1971/72 (1971)
   Leningrad Interzonal (1973)
   Madrid (1973)
   USSR Championship (1976)
   Bad Lauterberg (1977)
   Phillips & Drew GLC Kings (1984)
   Linares (1994)
   Brussels World Cup (1988)
   Cap D'Agde (2013)
   Trophee Anatoly Karpov (2012)
   Montreal (1979)
   Cap d'Agde (2008)
   San Antonio (1972)
   USSR Championship (1971)
   Superstars Hotel Bali (2002)

GAME COLLECTIONS: [what is this?]
   Karpov Tournament Champion - I by amadeus
   Anatoly Karpov - My Best 300 Games by jakaiden
   Karpov Tournament Champion - II by amadeus
   Match Karpov! by amadeus
   Anatoly Karpov's Best Games by Psihadal
   Anatoly Karpov's Best Games by KingG
   Guess-the-Move Chess: 1980-1989 (Part 1) by Anatoly21
   "Chess Genius Karpov" - Victor Baturinsky by Karpova
   a Karpov collection by obrit
   Basic Instinct by Imohthep
   How Karpov Wins 2nd Edition by BntLarsen
   Instructive Karpov Games by Billy Ray Valentine
   Karpov vs. the World Champions Decisive Games by visayanbraindoctor
   Guess-the-Move Chess: 1960-1979 (Part 2) by Anatoly21

Search Sacrifice Explorer for Anatoly Karpov
Search Google for Anatoly Karpov
FIDE player card for Anatoly Karpov


ANATOLY KARPOV
(born May-23-1951, 64 years old) Russia
PRONUNCIATION:
[what is this?]
Anatoly Yevgenyevich Karpov was born in the town of Zlatoust, located in the Southern Ural Mountains in the USSR. He learned to play chess at four years old and became a candidate master by age eleven. At twelve, Karpov was accepted into the chess academy presided over by Mikhail Botvinnik. Karpov won the World Junior Championship in 1969, thereby automatically gaining the title of International Master. In 1970, he became an International Grandmaster after finishing equal fourth at Caracas. A World Championship Candidate in 1973, he defeated Viktor Korchnoi in the Karpov - Korchnoi Candidates Final (1974) to earn the right to Karpov - Fischer World Championship Match (1975) with World Champion Robert James Fischer. When FIDE declared Fischer forfeited, Karpov became the 12th World Chess Champion, the youngest since Mikhail Tal in 1960.

Karpov defended the championship twice against Korchnoi in Karpov - Korchnoi World Championship Match (1978) and Karpov - Korchnoi World Championship Rematch (1981). After Karpov - Kasparov World Championship Match (1984) which was aborted with Karpov leading by 2 points over Garry Kasparov, he lost his title to Kasparov in Karpov - Kasparov World Championship Match (1985). He played three more closely contested matches with Kasparov, narrowly losing Karpov - Kasparov World Championship Rematch (1986), drawing Kasparov - Karpov World Championship Match (1987) and narrowly losing Kasparov - Karpov World Championship Match (1990).

Karpov was thrice Soviet Champion: in 1976*, 1983** and 1988***, on the latter occasion sharing the title with Kasparov. In 1993 Karpov regained the FIDE title against Jan Timman in Karpov - Timman FIDE World Championship (1993), after Kasparov had broken away from the organization. He successfully defended his title against Gata Kamsky in Karpov - Kamsky FIDE World Championship (1996) and Viswanathan Anand in Karpov - Anand World Championship Match (1998). In 1999 FIDE changed the rules, deciding that the World Champion would be determined by an annual knockout tournament, and Karpov retired from championship competition.

At Linares (1994), Karpov achieved one of the greatest tournament successes ever, distancing Kasparov by 2.5 points.

Outside of chess, Karpov has been linked to the company Petromir, which claimed in 2007 to have found a large natural gas field.****

* [rusbase-1]; ** [rusbase-2]; *** [rusbase-3]

**** Miriam Elder, The St. Petersburg Times, Issue # 1242, 2007.02.02, Link: http://sptimes.ru/index.php?action_... and The St. Petersburg Times, Issue # 1246, 2007.02.16, Link: http://sptimes.ru/index.php?action_...

Wikipedia article: Anatoly Karpov


 page 1 of 143; games 1-25 of 3,551  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. Karpov vs S Belousov 1-040 1961 BorowitschiC07 French, Tarrasch
2. G Timoshchenko vs Karpov 0-153 1961 BorovichiC10 French
3. Karpov vs Gaimaletdinov 1-060 1961 ZlatoustC62 Ruy Lopez, Old Steinitz Defense
4. Shusharin vs Karpov 0-135 1961 CheliabinskC77 Ruy Lopez
5. Karpov vs Ziuliarkin 1-035 1961 ZlatoustB24 Sicilian, Closed
6. Karpov vs Nedelin 1-036 1961 BorovichiC97 Ruy Lopez, Closed, Chigorin
7. Karpov vs Budakov ½-½26 1961 ZlatoustC99 Ruy Lopez, Closed, Chigorin, 12...cd
8. A Shneider vs Karpov 0-151 1961 CheliabinskC34 King's Gambit Accepted
9. Karpov vs Shefler 1-043 1961 ZlatoustC01 French, Exchange
10. Karpov vs A Alekseev ½-½58 1961 ZlatoustB40 Sicilian
11. E Lazarev vs Karpov 0-149 1961 CheliabinskD55 Queen's Gambit Declined
12. Karpov vs Mukhudulin ½-½61 1961 ZlatoustB56 Sicilian
13. Korchnoi vs Karpov ½-½30 1961 SimulC47 Four Knights
14. V Kalashnikov vs Karpov ½-½62 1961 ZlatoustE15 Queen's Indian
15. Zadneprovsky vs Karpov 0-165 1961 ZlatoustE27 Nimzo-Indian, Samisch Variation
16. B Kalinkin vs Karpov ½-½32 1961 CheliabinskC97 Ruy Lopez, Closed, Chigorin
17. Karpov vs V Kalashnikov 1-060 1961 ZlatoustC68 Ruy Lopez, Exchange
18. Karpov vs Maksimov 1-060 1961 MagnitogorskE81 King's Indian, Samisch
19. Tarinin vs Karpov 1-035 1961 ZlatoustC97 Ruy Lopez, Closed, Chigorin
20. Karpov vs Piskunov 1-035 1962 ZlatoustB03 Alekhine's Defense
21. Karpov vs Tarinin 1-053 1962 CheliabinskC73 Ruy Lopez, Modern Steinitz Defense
22. V Kalashnikov vs Karpov ½-½36 1962 ZlatoustC97 Ruy Lopez, Closed, Chigorin
23. Karpov vs Karin 1-039 1962 CheliabinskB06 Robatsch
24. Manakov vs Karpov 0-126 1962 KoyenskC84 Ruy Lopez, Closed
25. Aranov vs Karpov 0-171 1962 CheliabinskC10 French
 page 1 of 143; games 1-25 of 3,551  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2) | Karpov wins | Karpov loses  
 

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 234 OF 234 ·  Later Kibitzing>
May-21-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Caissanist: I don't understand the May 16th quote. What is the difference between "chess understanding" and "chess knowledge"? By "chess knowledge" does he just mean opening theory?
May-21-15  zanzibar: <Caissanist> that would be a quote which should include the original language version of it.

I imagine "chess knowledge" would be the body of chess contained in study books, including both endgame and opening theory. The stuff contained in the "Soviet School of Chess", another term hard to define precisely.

I could easily be wrong on this, of course.

May-21-15  Strelets: <zanzibar> Going further, I think Karpov means positional acumen or a general sense of what squares are important and where pieces are best placed by chess understanding. Fittingly, his games are excellent for learning how to deepen one's chess understanding.
May-21-15  zanzibar: I found a reference who points to the source of the quote - it's apparently from Karpov's then recently-published memoirs, and is mentioned in this 1992 newspaper article by Shelly Lyman:

https://news.google.com/newspapers?...

(The Telegraph - Apr 12, 1992, p48)

May-22-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Caissanist: <Strelets><zanzibar>, thanks for the insights, I had never heard the two terms used in quite that way before.
May-23-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: For some reason, I always remember when it's Karpov's birthday. We 1951 guys stick together.

Overshadowed by the ghost of Fischer and the specter of Kasparov, Karpov is not always mentioned among the greats. And perhaps he was propped up by the power of the Soviet System, and gladly accepted the advantages it gave him.

But one thing he did earns my admiration. He played, and he play4d well. Fischer's inactivity left a bad taste, and there were a lot of questions when Karpov came into the title. But he settled everything by going out and dominating the chess scene in the decade before Kasparov. Certainly no champion since Alekhine had produced the same sort of results while at the top.

May-23-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  eternaloptimist: Happy 64th birthday to my favorite chess player Anatoly Karpov (1 for every square on a chessboard)! <Phony> I always remember when it's Karpov's bday also. That's primarily b/c he's my favorite chess player. His bday is really close to my birthday (May 31st) as well. I think u hit the nail on the head mentioning Fischer's inactivity & Karpov's domination of the chess scene before Kasparov. Here's a great game by Karpov that's as smooth as butter & 1 of my favorite games of his in which he defeats GM Quinteros (from Argentina).: Karpov vs Quinteros, 1973 I played over this game for the 1st time in "My Best Games" by Karpov (the RHM book: http://www.abebooks.co.uk/servlet/F... that was published in 1978 not the newer Edition Olms book: http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/32830... published in 2008) during my late teenage years back in the late '80s. Although both books are definitely worth buying. This game has just stayed in my mind for a long time. This is probably b/c the coordination of his pieces is just superb, once his attack gets going it improves w/ pretty much every move & b/c Quinteros just got squeezed to the point where his ♔side pieces were suffocated. This game is more tactical than most of his games since he is a positional player, but the constricting nature of his attack is vintage Karpov!
May-24-15  TheFocus: Happy Birthday Karpov!

Such a great player.

May-24-15  rayoflight: Happy Birthday,Tolya.
Your games are great and eternal and you are a gentleman.Thank you Sir for the beauty you gifted to us.
May-24-15  TheFocus: <Since 1984, when these mad matches with Kasparov began, I never relaxed for more than ten days in a row> - Anatoly Karpov (in an interview with "Izvestia" on August 22, 2006).
May-24-15  TheFocus: <We spent one night at the train station in Berlin. To pass the time, we played cards. Karpov demonstrated his striking talent at game-playing. I explained the rules of a game that he had never played before to him, and Tolya began beating everyone right away> - Mark Dvoretsky.
May-24-15  TheFocus: <People knew about 110 years of chess history. Nowadays, nobody is able to tell you the name of the world champion of 2000> - Anatoly Karpov.
May-24-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: <TheFocus: <Combinations with a queen sacrifice are among the most striking and memorable> - Anatoly Karpov.>

I'm trying to find out if Ronald Reagan was a member of the Republican Party? Does anyone know?

May-24-15  TheFocus: Who's Ronald Reagan?
May-24-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: <TheFocus: <He was a pitiful sight to behold. Over and over he calculated and miscalculated the variations, and couldn’t understand how I could save myself. Of course he couldn’t — he was looking for something that wasn’t there> - Anatoly Karpov, on a Candidates’ Match game he managed to draw from a lost position against Lev Polugaevsky>

But what was the game? Karpov thinks it was not "lost", theFocus editorialized, methinks, that it was lost. Time for a scout around the correct match page...

May-24-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Benzol: Perhaps it might be this game Polugaevsky vs Karpov, 1974 or one of the other games from this match.
May-24-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: I think it's Polugaevsky vs Karpov, 1974.
May-24-15  TheFocus: <offramp> <theFocus editorialized>

No. I presented it as it was presented.

May-24-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: <offramp: <TheFocus: <He was a pitiful sight to behold. Over and over he calculated and miscalculated the variations, and couldn’t understand how I could save myself. Of course he couldn’t — he was looking for something that wasn’t there> - Anatoly Karpov, on a Candidates’ Match game he managed to draw from a lost position against Lev Polugaevsky> But what was the game? Karpov thinks it was not "lost", theFocus editorialized, methinks, that it was lost. Time for a scout around the correct match page...>

<TheFocus: <offramp> <theFocus editorialized> No. I presented it as it was presented.>

Well, Karpov says, "[Polugaevsky] couldn’t understand how I could save myself. Of course he couldn’t — he was looking for something that wasn’t there..." By which I think he means there was no win for Polugaevsky but Polu was looking for one. But SOMEONE has a different opinion of whatever game it was:

"Anatoly Karpov, on a Candidates’ Match game he managed to draw from a lost position against Lev Polugaevsky."

May-25-15  TheFocus: <I know Kasparov as well as I know anyone. I know his smell. I can read him by that. I recognize the smell when he is excited and I know when he is scared. We may be enemies, but we are intimate enemies> - Anatoly Karpov.
May-25-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: I have decided to sellotape this quote:

<TheFocus: <Like dogs who sniff each other when meeting, chess players have a ritual at first acquaintance: they sit down to play speed chess> - Anatoly Karpov.>

to this quote

<TheFocus: <I know Kasparov as well as I know anyone. I know his smell. I can read him by that. I recognize the smell when he is excited and I know when he is scared. We may be enemies, but we are intimate enemies> - Anatoly Karpov.>

to create this quote:

<When I first encountered Anatoly Karpov we sniffed each other like dogs and I could smell from his intimate areas that he was scared> - Gary Kasparov.

Now that IS a scary thought.

May-25-15  TheFocus: But how do we know that didn't really happen?
May-25-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: Because there is no sellotape in the Soviet Union.
May-25-15  Everett: <offramp> it is confusing, but Karpov believed there was no way for him to save the game with best play, that Polu was looking for a way for Karpov to save himself but couldn't find it. Why? Because it was not there to be found.

So the "saving a lost position" story line is consistent.

Now, all that being said, Kasparov, likely in an immense effort to make everyone else look bad, says the game was not truly lost for Black for most of it, which ruins the fun.

May-26-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: <Everett: <offramp> it is confusing, but Karpov believed there was no way for him to save the game with best play...>

It certainly is confusing because I thought Karpov was saying that he was NOT lost.

<[He] couldn’t understand how I could save myself. Of course he couldn’t — he was looking for something that wasn’t there>

I understood the "something that wasn't there" as being "a win".

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