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Gerald Abrahams
Number of games in database: 90
Years covered: 1923 to 1962
Overall record: +33 -40 =15 (46.0%)*
   * Overall winning percentage = (wins+draws/2) / total games
      Based on games in the database; may be incomplete.
      2 exhibition games, odds games, etc. are excluded from this statistic.

MOST PLAYED OPENINGS
With the White pieces:
 Nimzo Indian (6) 
    E20 E47 E30 E52 E56
 Grunfeld (5) 
    D93 D90 D82
 King's Indian (5) 
    E90 E61 E80 E65 E91
With the Black pieces:
 Queen's Gambit Declined (13) 
    D31 D30 D38
 Ruy Lopez (6) 
    C97 C77 C86 C83
 Queen's Pawn Game (5) 
    D02 A40 A50
Repertoire Explorer

NOTABLE GAMES: [what is this?]
   NN vs G Abrahams, 1929 0-1
   G Abrahams vs W R Thomas, 1923 1-0
   G Abrahams vs J H Beaty, 1962 1-0
   G Abrahams vs W H Watts, 1936 1-0

NOTABLE TOURNAMENTS: [what is this?]
   London B (1946)
   Hastings 1946/47 (1946)

GAME COLLECTIONS: [what is this?]
   London B 1946 by Tabanus
   Hastings 1946/47 by Phony Benoni

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GERALD ABRAHAMS
(born Apr-15-1907, died Mar-15-1980, 72 years old) United Kingdom

[what is this?]
Gerald Abrahams was an author, a barrister and a very strong amateur who in the 1930's was playing master-class chess. At the Nottingham Major Open 1936 he finished 3rd= with Karel Opocensky and in the 1946 Anglo-Soviet radio match he scored (+1, =1) against Viacheslav Ragozin. He also invented a variation of the Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav Defense, known as the Abrahams-Noteboom variation. As an author his main chess works are "Teach Yourself Chess," "The Chess Mind," "Test Your Chess," "Pan Book of Chess," "Handbook of Chess," "Not Only Chess," "Brilliancies in Chess," and "Technique in Chess."

Wikipedia article: Gerald Abrahams


 page 1 of 4; games 1-25 of 90  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. G Abrahams vs W R Thomas 1-07 1923 ?B01 Scandinavian
2. Rubinstein vs G Abrahams  ½-½32 1924 SimulC30 King's Gambit Declined
3. Rubinstein vs G Abrahams  0-135 1925 SimulD02 Queen's Pawn Game
4. G Abrahams vs Colle 1-020 1929 LiverpoolE12 Queen's Indian
5. NN vs G Abrahams 0-111 1929 ENGD31 Queen's Gambit Declined
6. Menchik vs G Abrahams 0-131 1930 CanterburyD30 Queen's Gambit Declined
7. G Abrahams vs E Spencer 1-020 1930 LiverpoolD90 Grunfeld
8. G A Thomas vs G Abrahams  1-043 1930 CanterburyD46 Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav
9. G Abrahams vs Yates 0-144 1930 CanterburyA00 Uncommon Opening
10. G Abrahams vs E Spencer  1-030 1930 CanterburyD46 Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav
11. Golombek vs G Abrahams  1-027 1935 BCF-chA34 English, Symmetrical
12. G Abrahams vs W H Watts 1-042 1936 Major OpenE80 King's Indian, Samisch Variation
13. G Abrahams vs J Cukierman 1-036 1936 Major OpenA50 Queen's Pawn Game
14. I Koenig vs G Abrahams  1-050 1939 BournemouthD31 Queen's Gambit Declined
15. G Abrahams vs Flohr  0-125 1939 BournemouthD93 Grunfeld, with Bf4 & e3
16. G Abrahams vs Opocensky 1-025 1939 MargateC17 French, Winawer, Advance
17. F Kitto vs G Abrahams  1-049 1939 BournemouthD31 Queen's Gambit Declined
18. G Abrahams vs A G Conde 0-130 1939 BournemouthE20 Nimzo-Indian
19. A Thomas vs G Abrahams  1-032 1939 BournemouthA34 English, Symmetrical
20. Euwe vs G Abrahams 1-014 1939 BournemouthA40 Queen's Pawn Game
21. G Abrahams vs Aitken  0-128 1939 BournemouthC50 Giuoco Piano
22. Mieses vs G Abrahams 0-195 1939 BournemouthB24 Sicilian, Closed
23. G Abrahams vs P N Wallis  0-138 1939 BournemouthD11 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
24. S Landau vs G Abrahams 1-0100 1939 BournemouthD31 Queen's Gambit Declined
25. G Abrahams vs E Klein  0-147 1939 BournemouthE01 Catalan, Closed
 page 1 of 4; games 1-25 of 90  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2) | Abrahams wins | Abrahams loses  

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jun-21-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: I have seen The Chess Mind often in second hand book shops. It is in sale for a fiver (£5) in the Chess & Bridge Centre near Great Portland Street - though I imagine tha that is of little use to you.
Jun-21-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: Noted for his use of rooks as an attacking force.
Aug-09-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  TheAlchemist: "Good positions don't win games, good moves do."

I have lost counting on how many times I have learned this first-hand, yet I still haven't learned it :-)

Oct-14-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  cu8sfan: <Quote of the day: Good positions don't win games, good moves do.>

Great quote. I don't know where I read this but a positional advantage must always(?) be converted to an attack.

Aug-26-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Karpova: <At a simultaneous display in Liverpool in autumn 1923 Abrahams, then aged 16, was the last surviving player:

‘And there was Alekhine, standing over the board, insisting on instantaneous replies. He thought, then made his move, rapped sharply on the table and made impatient sounds in Russian.

The position was hard. Pawns wedged with pawns, and my king bishop and knight, endeavouring to be on guard at all moments against his king, and two fantastically wheeling knights. After 12 lightning moves under these conditions the boy went wrong, found a pawn indefensible, and resigned. The grandmaster swept the pieces aside brusquely, and stalked away. He was, let me emphasize, entirely within his rights.’

After describing how differently Capablanca later behaved towards him in similar circumstances, Abrahams related that at Nottingham in 1936 Alekhine’s wife (‘a delightful American lady’) required assistance with a visa renewal.

‘Alekhine asked me to oblige, and I gladly did so. He said, “If I can ever do anything for you, please ask me.” I replied, “You can do something for me.” He raised an interrogative eyebrow. I said, “Be more considerate to small boys.” The frozen blue eyes stared at me for some seconds. “Yes”, he said, I remember, Liverpool 1923. You had pawns, bishop and knight against my pawns and two knights. You should have drawn that game.”’> http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/... (There's also a picture of Gerald Abrahams)

Feb-03-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Karpova: An interesting feature article on the famous Wallace Murder Case (1931): http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/...

Julia Wallace had been murdered and her husband - Chessplayer William Herbert Wallace was the main suspect. The case is regarded to be unsolvable and sometimes ranked second to Jack the Ripper.

Jonathan Goodman:
<‘As for Wallace being a chessplayer: this was interpreted to mean that he was able to devise a far more cunning murder plan than the average citizen. It was reported that he was “a master player; a man with a mind as brilliant as it was perverted, trained to think ahead to the next moves, and to anticipate the moves which his opponent would make”. [...]

The only people, it seems, who did not subscribe to this notion were those who had had the misfortune to play chess with Wallace. [...]

Another member – a true devotee, this one – remarked, “The murder of his wife apart, I think Wallace ought to be hanged for being such a bad chessplayer.”>

Gerald Abrahams:
< ‘Journalists have agitated their readers for many years with the question: was Wallace guilty?

There are three approaches to this question:

(1) Legally, it is academic. There was no evidence against him.

(2) Personally. His acquaintances (excluding those who revel in the troubles of their “friends”) seem convinced of his innocence. The author takes the view that to vest Wallace with guilt in the circumstances is to credit him with a mental power, a skill, an agility, a cold-blooded nerveless efficiency, of which he seemed utterly incapable.

(3) Scientifically, it is a much easier hypothesis to assume another person as murderer, whose task would have been easier, mental effort less. By the principle of simple explanations Wallace was innocent.>

Apr-15-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  brankat: <Karpova> A most fascinating article!
Apr-15-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Player of the day.

<He is best known for the <Abrahams Defence>> according to wiki~ and

<He also invented a variation of the Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav Defense, known as the <Abrahams-Noteboom variation>.> according to cg-bio.

Who knows the exact move order of this line ?

Apr-15-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  pawn to QB4: Hi whiteshark - Abrahams in his book "Not Only Chess" says that he first played "the uninterrupted line" in a university game for Oxford v London ; opponent's name was Allcock and it kicked off 1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 c6 4. Nf3 dxc4 5. e3 b5 6. a4 Bb4. He seems to claim this as the novelty. One of quite a few games in the book we don't seem to have yet, including some real brilliancies - one's his favourite game, v Spencer Liverpool 1930, and includes a move he tells us Emanuel Lasker described as "one of the best sacrifices in the history of chess". I'll send them in.
Apr-15-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jim Bartle: “The murder of his wife apart, I think Wallace ought to be hanged for being such a bad chessplayer.”

Applied generally, there's your solution to overpopulation right there.

Apr-15-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Karpova: A game from Bad Gastein, 1948:

Danielsson v Abrahams

1.Nf3 f5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 c6 4.O-O d6 5.d4 Qc7 6.c4 e5 7.Nc3 Be7 8.dxe5 dxe5 9.e4 O-O 10.exf5 Bxf5 11.Qe2 Nbd7 12.Re1 Rae8 13.Bg5 h6 14.Bxf6 Bxf6 15.Ne4 Bxe4 16.Qxe4 Nc5 17.Qc2 e4 18.Nd2 Bd4 19.Re2 e3 20.Nf3 exf2+ 21.Kf1 Be3 22.b4 Na6 23.Qb3 Qe7 24.Rd1 Qe6 25.a3 c5 26.b5 Nc7 27.g4 Qe4 28.Rd3 Rxf3 29.Bxf3 Qxf3 30.Rexe3 Qh1+ 31.Kxf2 Ne6 32.Qd1 Qxh2+ 33.Ke1 Rf8 34.Rf3 (The ChessBase Megabase has a different move order: 32...Rf8 33.Rf3 Qxh2+ 34.Ke1.) 34...Nf4 35.Rxf4 Re8+ 36.Kf1 Qxf4+ 37.Kg1 Re4 38.Rd8+ Kh7 39.Qd3 Qxg4+ 40.Kh1 Qh5+ 41.Kg2 Qg6+ 42.Kf3 Qf5+ 43.Kg3 Rg4+ 44.Kh3 Qxd3+ 45.Rxd3 Rxc4 46.Rd7 Rc3+ 47.Kh4 Rxa3 48.Rxb7 c4 49.Kh5 c3 50.Rc7 Ra4 51.b6 c2 52.b7 c1(Q) 0-1

<Described as “an extremely interesting game”, it was annotated in the Games Department of the BCM, conducted by C.H.O’D. Alexander, with the following remark after move 27:

“Abrahams plays the ending somewhat maliciously, holding out tempting hopes of stalemate to his opponent only to disappoint him unkindly at the end.”>

<However, on page 259 of Not Only Chess (London, 1974) and page 137 of Brilliance in Chess (London, 1977) Abrahams himself wrote:

“The Bad Gastein organizers promised me a brilliancy prize for this [i. e. Abrahams' game against Toth, Karpova], but all I got was a free copy of the tournament book.”’>

http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/... (scroll down to 4220)

Jul-12-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: <Chess is a good mistress but a bad master.>

-- Gerald Abrahams

QotD on gmchess.com

Apr-15-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  wordfunph: "I've wasted a black." (Gerald Abrahams after drawing a game with the black pieces)

Happy Birthday G. Abrahams!

Apr-15-09  WhiteRook48: Happy birthday G Abrahams
Sep-24-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  Domdaniel: <The frozen blue eyes stared at me for some seconds. “Yes”, he said, I remember, Liverpool 1923.> I love that story about Alekhine. Funny how often the great players are seen as having 'chilly' or 'mesmeric' eyes. Fischer and Tal were said to hypnotize opponents. And Gufeld had a story about looking up, after playing a sac in a team match, and finding the laser-beam eyes of Botvinnik fixed on him.
Apr-15-11  andrewjsacks: His "The Chess Mind" is an extremely interesting and rather unusual chess book. Should be required reading for any true lover of our game.
Apr-15-11  BIDMONFA: Gerald Abrahams

ABRAHAMS, Gerald
http://www.bidmonfa.com/abrahams_ge...
_

Jan-27-12  Antiochus: "Exclusively the Strategist knows what to do when there's nothing to do."

Gerald Abrahams.

Mar-29-12  SimonWebbsTiger: Heartily concur with other posters re. the Chess Mind.

I picked up a copy, in good condition, for a mere 5 Danish Kroner recently!

<Why some persons are good at Chess, and others bad at it, is more mysterious than anything on the Chess board.> Abrahams

Jan-17-13  cornwallman: Only one of his books is currently in print, Technique in Chess published by Dover Books, they also at one time published his Teach Your Self Chess.
Jan-18-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: Another vote for The Chess Mind-a most fascinating book.
Jan-18-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eduardo Bermudez: About the CHESS MIND : "The author express the combined influence of Inmanuel Kant and Enmanuel Lasker" G. Abrahamns (1952)
Sep-22-13  Penguincw: K Quote of the Day K

< "In chess there is a world of intellectual values." >

-Gerald Abrahams

Sep-24-13  Penguincw: K Quote of the Day K

< "Chess is a good mistress but a bad master." >

-Gerald Abrahams

Jun-29-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <Karpova> Interesting story of the first encounter between Abrahams and Alekhine.
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