chessgames.com

  
Nigel Rodney Davies
Number of games in database: 672
Years covered: 1975 to 2012
Last FIDE rating: 2494
Highest rating achieved in database: 2639
Overall record: +232 -137 =300 (57.1%)*
   * Overall winning percentage = (wins+draws/2) / total games
      Based on games in the database; may be incomplete.
      3 exhibition games, odds games, etc. are excluded from this statistic.

MOST PLAYED OPENINGS
With the White pieces:
 King's Indian Attack (37) 
    A07 A08
 Reti System (31) 
    A04 A05 A06
 English (30) 
    A14 A15 A10 A13 A11
 Sicilian (28) 
    B50 B40 B20 B31 B21
 English, 1 c4 e5 (21) 
    A20 A29 A25 A26
 King's Indian (21) 
    E63 E60 E64 E62 E69
With the Black pieces:
 Robatsch (57) 
    B06
 Queen's Pawn Game (49) 
    A41 A40 A46 A45 D02
 Ruy Lopez (36) 
    C72 C96 C73 C92 C79
 Sicilian (25) 
    B27 B42 B40 B25 B21
 Pirc (24) 
    B08 B09 B07
 King's Indian (23) 
    E94 E92 E62 E81 E61
Repertoire Explorer

NOTABLE GAMES: [what is this?]
   N Davies vs C Duncan, 1999 1-0
   N Davies vs R Jamieson, 1975 1-0
   N Davies vs R J Dive, 1994 1-0
   E J Gausel vs N Davies, 1988 0-1
   M Godena vs N Davies, 1993 0-1
   M Berkovich vs N Davies, 1992 0-1
   Anand vs N Davies, 1987 0-1
   L Busquets vs N Davies, 1991 0-1
   K N Engedal vs N Davies, 1990 0-1
   M Kaminski vs N Davies, 1993 0-1

NOTABLE TOURNAMENTS: [what is this?]
   Lone Pine (1981)
   Gibraltar Masters (2004)
   British Championship (2006)
   British Championship (2008)
   European Union Championships (2008)
   Howard Staunton Memorial (2009)

GAME COLLECTIONS: [what is this?]
   Peter R's Modern Defense by Peter R

Search Sacrifice Explorer for Nigel Rodney Davies
Search Google for Nigel Rodney Davies
FIDE player card for Nigel Rodney Davies


NIGEL RODNEY DAVIES
(born Jul-31-1960) United Kingdom

[what is this?]
Nigel Rodney Davies was born in Southport, England. He was awarded the IM title in 1982, and the GM title in 1993. He is also an opening author of note.

 page 1 of 27; games 1-25 of 672  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. N Davies vs R Jamieson 1-035 1975 AustraliaA02 Bird's Opening
2. J Horner vs N Davies  0-160 1977 ChorleyC63 Ruy Lopez, Schliemann Defense
3. N Davies vs M J Freeman  ½-½52 1979 BenedictineA03 Bird's Opening
4. J Van Mil vs N Davies  ½-½60 1981 WchT U26A40 Queen's Pawn Game
5. Hebert vs N Davies  0-132 1981 Lone PineB10 Caro-Kann
6. N Davies vs I Dahlberg  0-131 1981 Lone PineC15 French, Winawer
7. N Davies vs Benko  0-162 1981 Lone PineC65 Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defense
8. N Davies vs D Gurevich  ½-½97 1981 Lone PineB07 Pirc
9. Soltis vs N Davies  1-042 1981 Lone PineB10 Caro-Kann
10. N Davies vs P Wells  0-140 1981 BCF-chA14 English
11. D Polajzer vs N Davies  0-119 1981 Ch World (team) (under 26)A42 Modern Defense, Averbakh System
12. Fedorowicz vs N Davies  1-040 1981 Lone PineB16 Caro-Kann, Bronstein-Larsen Variation
13. Bisguier vs N Davies 0-145 1981 Lone PineD02 Queen's Pawn Game
14. N Davies vs J Thinnsen 1-016 1981 Lone PineB31 Sicilian, Rossolimo Variation
15. R Nokes vs N Davies  0-142 1981 BCF-chB06 Robatsch
16. P Stempin vs N Davies  0-139 1981 Ch World (team) (under 26)A42 Modern Defense, Averbakh System
17. L Gutman vs N Davies  1-026 1981 Lone PineA41 Queen's Pawn Game (with ...d6)
18. N Davies vs D King  ½-½37 1982 Hamar (Norway)D91 Grunfeld, 5.Bg5
19. Hebden vs N Davies  1-033 1983 NottinghamB21 Sicilian, 2.f4 and 2.d4
20. Lputian vs N Davies  1-023 1983 World Under-26 Teams ChA42 Modern Defense, Averbakh System
21. Minev vs N Davies 0-137 1983 Hamar opB06 Robatsch
22. N Davies vs Petursson  ½-½35 1983 Hamar opB21 Sicilian, 2.f4 and 2.d4
23. N Davies vs T Clarke  ½-½57 1984 BCF-chA81 Dutch
24. M Steinbacher vs N Davies  1-051 1985 Bundesliga /86B06 Robatsch
25. N Davies vs V Wolf  ½-½41 1985 Bundesliga /86A00 Uncommon Opening
 page 1 of 27; games 1-25 of 672  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2) | Davies wins | Davies loses  

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Dec-30-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  katar: <notyetagm> Thanks for that link! I'm looking forward to it! Anything by Nigel Davies is pure gold for us class players (1819uscf).
Feb-18-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  furrer: I read on amazon.com that hes aouther for a book on the catalan? Do anybody here have some tips for a good book on the catalan?
Feb-18-09  whiskeyrebel: My favorite Catalan book is "the Catalan" by Raetsky & Chetverik (Everyman Chess).
Feb-18-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  furrer: ok, sounds interesting, Ill take a look at it when im done with my Najdorf rep.
Feb-18-09  whiskeyrebel: I also have the Angus Dunnington book on the Catalan. I prefer the Raetsky & Chetverik. They cover the wild lines where black plays an early b5 and tries to hold onto the pawn better according to my amateur understanding of course. I also picked up a good deal on the Catalan from John Donaldson's white repertoire book which is topnotch.
Feb-19-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  furrer: Yeah, the b5 variations (white pawn sacrifice) were actually the reason I didnt wanted to play the Catalan, but I have changed opinion :D
Feb-19-09  whiskeyrebel: White has a raftload of compensation that seems fairly easy to take advantage of. My early attempts (I just started playing it at the U.S. open last August ) with the Catalan have lead me to agree with Donaldson that amateur players don't often have a planned response to it. Everybody seems to think they can wing it.
Feb-19-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  furrer: Yeah, and genereally i play the fianchetto against all indians + benoni/benko, so why shouldnt I play it against the QGA/QGD/Slav!? :) Much easier rep., and perhaps white will not obtain an davantage, but in the endgame (according to Sloth, world corrospondence champion), black has to play 10x more precise then white.
Mar-03-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: "One of the hallmarks of very strong players is the ability to recognize when they should try to do something and when it is better to play a move which just simply improves their position.

This is why top class games often give the impression that nothing is really happening whilst in reality their outwardly innocuous moves represent a cagey struggle to outmaneuver their opponent.

The two adversaries are working towards the right moment to strike, knowing full well that a premature attempt to force matters could simply lose the advantage or even totally rebound."

-- Nigel Davies

--> Quotes Of The Day (from Kelly Atkins) http://www.gmchess.com/

Mar-07-09  WhiteRook48: that correspondence game was long
Mar-07-09  MaxxLange: I really like his "Let's Take A Look" column at Chess Cafe
May-27-09  myschkin: . . .

another "little" fan of Nigel: http://kaydensstory.blogspot.com/

Bio: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kayden...

Jan-21-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Nigel Davies' <Advice on Torture>:

"Sometimes the market reminds me of playing a worse endgame against someone like Mikhail Gurevich. They move you back and forth, slowly improving their position whilst testing your nerves and patience. The advantage may not be much at first, but when compounded by some small mistakes it becomes much more serious. Strange things start happening when you're put on the rack, opportunities are missed and the mind starts playing tricks."

http://www.dailyspeculations.com/wo..., July 26, 2007

Mar-26-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  wordfunph: During the school days of Nigel Davies, he spent many happy hours, during mathematics lesson, working out the famous knight tour puzzle in the back of his exercise book.
Jun-10-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Quote of the Day

<It's amazing how bad much published analysis is; you discover this when you check it, especially with Fritz running in the background. And once a mistake has been made it is usually copied uncritically by other authors.>

-- Nigel Davies

I feel I'm to blame. ;D

Oct-21-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: <It's amazing how bad much published analysis is; you discover this when you check it, especially with Fritz running in the background. And once a mistake has been made it is usually copied uncritically by other authors.>

What a lifemasterish description

Oct-21-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Quote of the Day

< There are a number of top professionals (e.g. Morozevich & Korchnoi) who have expressed the view that White's supposed advantage in chess does not actually exist. >

-- Nigel Davies

Oct-21-11  BobCrisp: Imagine being rated 2600+ and still not being the top rated <Nigel> in the world. So unfair.
Jul-31-12  LoveThatJoker: Happy Birthday, GM Davies!

LTJ

Jun-13-13  JustAnotherPatzer: Man, i didn't know Davies had been rated as high as 2639! Not saying i credit 'inflation' but that rating is very high even by today's standards, back in the day it was world class.
Jul-31-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: This guy was a born exactly a week before I was.
Jul-31-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: The name inspires chess, comedy and Mod London pop rock. That's a lot for one name. We just need a chess player named David Watts, and we're set.
Jul-31-13  mrandersson: Really top bloke and nice guy all round. Had the joy at meeting him at my local club some months back.
Jul-31-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  redlance: Happy Birthday!!!
Sep-06-13  Penguincw: Quote of the Day

< "There are a number of top professionals (e.g. Morozevich & Korchnoi) who have expressed the view that White's supposed advantage in chess does not actually exist." >

-Nigel Davies

Hmm.

With white, Morozevich has won 45.9% (344/750), drawn 33.3% (250/750) and lost 20.8% (156/750). With black, he's won 34.8% (271/778), drew 35.2% (274/778) and lost 29.9% )233/778)

Meanwhile, Korchnoi with white has a split of 48.1%/37.8%/14.1% (1,074/845/315 out of 2,235, which don't seem to add up). With the other pieces, it's 34.0%/45.6%/20.4% (757/1,016/454 out of 2,228 games).

Jump to page #   (enter # from 1 to 3)
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, totally anonymous, and 100% free--plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, or duplicating posts.
  3. No personal attacks against other users.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform an administrator.


NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific player and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, you might try the Kibitzer's Café.
Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors.
Spot an error? Please suggest your correction and help us eliminate database mistakes!


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Little ChessPartner | privacy notice | contact us
Copyright 2001-2014, Chessgames Services LLC
Web design & database development by 20/20 Technologies