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V Tukmakov 
 
Vladimir Borisovich Tukmakov
Number of games in database: 2,400
Years covered: 1962 to 2007
Last FIDE rating: 2540
Highest rating achieved in database: 2605
Overall record: +917 -354 =1054 (62.1%)*
   * Overall winning percentage = (wins+draws/2) / total games
      Based on games in the database; may be incomplete.
      75 exhibition games, odds games, etc. are excluded from this statistic.

MOST PLAYED OPENINGS
With the White pieces:
 King's Indian (169) 
    E97 E60 E94 E73 E62
 Queen's Pawn Game (106) 
    E00 A40 A41 A46 E10
 Queen's Indian (95) 
    E15 E12 E17 E16 E19
 Sicilian (84) 
    B42 B36 B97 B96 B83
 Catalan (59) 
    E06 E04 E01 E08 E07
 Grunfeld (57) 
    D97 D76 D85 D78 D73
With the Black pieces:
 Sicilian (344) 
    B66 B67 B22 B56 B50
 Grunfeld (141) 
    D85 D86 D97 D80 D94
 Sicilian Richter-Rauser (81) 
    B66 B67 B62 B64 B69
 Queen's Indian (67) 
    E15 E12 E17 E14 E16
 Slav (67) 
    D17 D15 D19 D11 D12
 Ruy Lopez (53) 
    C95 C80 C61 C77 C82
Repertoire Explorer

NOTABLE GAMES: [what is this?]
   V Tukmakov vs D Norwood, 1990 1-0
   V Tukmakov vs Korchnoi, 1970 1-0
   Kasparov vs V Tukmakov, 1982 1/2-1/2
   Doroshkievich vs V Tukmakov, 1970 0-1
   Korchnoi vs V Tukmakov, 1971 0-1
   V Tukmakov vs Speelman, 1994 1-0
   V Tukmakov vs Razuvaev, 1983 1-0
   S Bouaziz vs V Tukmakov, 1982 1/2-1/2
   A Kapengut vs V Tukmakov, 1963 0-1
   V Tukmakov vs P Van der Sterren, 1993 1-0

NOTABLE TOURNAMENTS: [what is this?]
   USSR Championship (1970)
   Buenos Aires (1970)
   Madrid (1973)
   50th USSR Championship (1983)
   Hastings 1968/69 (1968)
   Moscow (1971)
   Las Palmas Interzonal (1982)
   USSR Championship (1972)
   Pivdenny Bank Chess Cup (2007)
   USSR Championship (1973)
   Amsterdam Chess Tournament (2006)
   USSR Championship (1967)
   Leningrad Interzonal (1973)
   USSR Championship (1971)

GAME COLLECTIONS: [what is this?]
   USSR Championship 1983 by Benzol
   Madrid 1973 by suenteus po 147
   Las Palmas Interzonal 1982 by suenteus po 147
   Wijk aan Zee Hoogovens 1984 by suenteus po 147

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FIDE player card for Vladimir Borisovich Tukmakov


VLADIMIR BORISOVICH TUKMAKOV
(born Mar-05-1946, 69 years old) Ukraine

[what is this?]
Vladimir Borisovich Tukmakov was born in Odessa (Ukraine). He became a GM in 1972. He scored most of his best tournament results in the 1970s, including 2nd after Robert James Fischer at Buenos Aires (1970), 4th= with Tigran Vartanovich Petrosian after Anatoly Karpov, Leonid Stein and Vasily Smyslov at Moscow (1971) and half a point behind Anatoly Karpov at Madrid (1973).

Tukmakov participated in 14 USSR championships between 1967 and 1989, scoring approximately 50%, and finishing second at the USSR Championship (1970) and 50th USSR Championship (1983). He played on the USSR team at the 1984 Thessaloniki Olympiad.(1) He captained the victorious Ukrainian team at the 36th Olympiad (2004) in Calvia, Spain. He is a FIDE Senior Trainer.

(1) source: http://www.jewsinsports.org/

Wikipedia article: Vladimir Tukmakov


 page 1 of 96; games 1-25 of 2,400  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. A Vitolinsh vs V Tukmakov 1-034 1962 URS-ch sfB66 Sicilian, Richter-Rauzer Attack, 7...a6
2. V Tukmakov vs A Vooremaa  0-140 1962 URS-chTB03 Alekhine's Defense
3. V Tukmakov vs I Nemet  1-037 1962 URS-JUG2A45 Queen's Pawn Game
4. A Vitolinsh vs V Tukmakov  ½-½38 1962 URS-chTC77 Ruy Lopez
5. I Nemet vs V Tukmakov  0-137 1962 URS-JUG2B09 Pirc, Austrian Attack
6. V Tukmakov vs A Goikhman  0-139 1962 URS-chTC74 Ruy Lopez, Modern Steinitz Defense
7. V Tukmakov vs I Nemet  1-066 1962 URS-JUG2B98 Sicilian, Najdorf
8. A Kapengut vs V Tukmakov 1-020 1962 URS-chTB07 Pirc
9. M Ankerst vs V Tukmakov  ½-½47 1962 URS-JUG2C47 Four Knights
10. V Tukmakov vs V Faibisovich 1-058 1962 URS-chTB35 Sicilian, Accelerated Fianchetto, Modern Variation with Bc4
11. V Tukmakov vs M Ankerst  ½-½40 1962 URS-JUG2B97 Sicilian, Najdorf
12. A Dubinsky vs V Tukmakov  ½-½15 1962 URS-chTC81 Ruy Lopez, Open, Howell Attack
13. M Ankerst vs V Tukmakov 0-129 1962 URS-JUG2B88 Sicilian, Fischer-Sozin Attack
14. V Tukmakov vs A Butnorius  ½-½61 1962 URS-chTC75 Ruy Lopez, Modern Steinitz Defense
15. J I Zilber vs V Tukmakov  1-029 1962 URS-ch sfA07 King's Indian Attack
16. V Tukmakov vs M Klimenok  1-041 1962 URS-ch sfB98 Sicilian, Najdorf
17. A Zakharov vs V Tukmakov  1-024 1962 URS-chTB67 Sicilian, Richter-Rauzer Attack, 7...a6 Defense, 8...Bd7
18. I Platonov vs V Tukmakov  0-128 1963 UKR-chB78 Sicilian, Dragon, Yugoslav Attack, 10.castle long
19. V Tukmakov vs Y Kots  0-130 1963 UKR-chB97 Sicilian, Najdorf
20. V Tukmakov vs V A Tokarev  ½-½50 1963 UKR-chB09 Pirc, Austrian Attack
21. Gufeld vs V Tukmakov 1-025 1963 UKR-chE61 King's Indian
22. A Zakharov vs V Tukmakov  1-028 1963 URSA68 Benoni, Four Pawns Attack
23. V Tukmakov vs J Rotstein  1-045 1963 UKR-chC41 Philidor Defense
24. V Tukmakov vs R Romanovsky  ½-½36 1963 UKR-chC92 Ruy Lopez, Closed
25. N Levin vs V Tukmakov  1-024 1963 UKR-chB09 Pirc, Austrian Attack
 page 1 of 96; games 1-25 of 2,400  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2) | Tukmakov wins | Tukmakov loses  
 

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Feb-07-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  ray keene: tukmakov is a high quality player and his games will form a most useful study resource here!
Mar-15-06  BIDMONFA: Vladimir Borisovich Tukmakov

TUKMAKOV, Vladimir B.
http://www.bidmonfa.com/tukmakov_vl...
_

Mar-15-07  Laskerfan82: Glad to see him as player of the day. I will always remember how my former coach IM Ilya Botvinnik spoke with great reverence about Tukmakov. To translate one of his comments (our lessons were in Hebrew): "Tukmakov was a very strong Grandmaster. VERY strong."

Analyzing Tukmakov's games games is rewarding for the aspiring student. Many of them are strategically rich. His best games are from the late 1970s through the mid 1980s.

Mar-15-08  brankat: Happy Birthday Vladimir Borisovich!
Mar-15-09  brankat: Happy Birthday Vladimir!
Oct-05-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  amadeus: Khanty-Mansiysk 2010: http://www.chessvibes.com/plaatjes/...
Mar-15-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  wordfunph: Newspaper Komsomolskaya Pravda presented the results of the Chiburdanidze-Tukmakov game (USSR Championship 1st Division): Many Time Prize Winner of the USSR Championships GM Vladimir Tukmakov Lost to a 17-year-old Girl! The psychological effect on Tukmakov resulted in his losing seven games in a row!

happy 65th birthday GM Tukmakov!

Mar-15-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: Happy Birthday Vladimir Borisovich Tukmakov !
Mar-15-11  brankat: Happy Birthday GM Tukmakov!
May-17-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  wordfunph: IM Liu Wenzhe once asked GM Vladimir Tukmakov, an authority on the openings, what he thought of the Encyclopedia of Chess Openings. He told Liu that the book was written for children!

Source: Chinese School of Chess by Liu Wenzhe

Nov-27-11  ketchuplover: Due out 4-16-12 is Modern Chess Preparation:Getting Ready for Your Opponent in the Information Age
Dec-18-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  wordfunph: thanks <ketch>!

here's the book description..

<Opening, middlegame and endgame are the three universally recognized stages of a game of chess, but what about the art of preparation? Winning starts with planning before the game, teaches legendary chess trainer Vladimir Tukmakov in this enlightening and entertaining work on a neglected subject.

Exploring and understanding, prior to the game, the strengths and weaknesses of your next opponent and being aware of your own strong points and shortcomings, are a key to success. Tukmakov describes how planning has become a systematic process, how methodical preparation works, and which critical steps you have to take.

The role of the computer in preparing for a game has grown tremendously, and Modern Chess Preparation explains how it is used by top players to get organized for success. But you will also learn the limitations on the use of chess engines and databases and how disastrous it can be to overly respect them and rely on them. A separate chapter is devoted on how to prepare for all-important games, games that will decide a tournament, a match or a even an entire career. Modern Chess Preparation is about more than just opening preparation. It also teaches you how to immerse yourself in order to find the best approach to the game. With powerful anecdotes and many instructive high-level games, Tukmakov explains how, as a competitive chess player, you can organize your homework, focus your efforts, and arrive at a viable game plan.

Vladimir Tukmakov is a chess grandmaster and a former national champion of Ukraine. In his active career he won many tournaments as well as gold medals in international team competitions. He is universally acknowledged as an outstanding chess trainer and coach.>

http://www.amazon.com/Modern-Chess-...

this is the book i've been looking for ages, cheers to GM Tukmakov!

Mar-15-12  brankat: Wishing You a Happy Birthday!
Mar-15-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  wordfunph: "The courageous struggle."

- GM Vladimir Tukmakov (when asked what he valued most in chess)

Happy Birthday GM Tukmakov!

Mar-15-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Stonehenge: He was actually born on the 5th of March :) I changed the bio.
Mar-16-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  wordfunph: uh ohh :(

gracias amigo <Stonehenge>..

Jun-01-12  ketchuplover: Profession:ChessPlayer-Grandmaster at Work is now available via new-in-chess.

Enjoy!

Jun-01-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  wordfunph: thanks <ketchup>..

Profession: Chessplayer: Grandmaster at Work by Vladimir Tukmakov

http://www.amazon.com/Profession-Ch...

Dec-03-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  parisattack: I'll have to get this book; thanks <ketchuplover> and <wordfunph>.

Around 1970 or so the guessing game was who would be the next Soviet Super GM - Karpov or Tukmakov...

Jan-16-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  cro777: GM Vladimir Tukmakov, after his active career, became an esteemed chess coach. He is new coach and second of GM Anish Giri. Tata Steel Chess 2014 is Giri's first event with Tukmakov.
Jan-21-14  EvanTheTerrible: And the event has been a mighty success for Giri.
Sep-19-14  Mudphudder: 2400 games on this site?!!!!
May-11-15  zanzibar: 2400 games and they're still missing this gem from him:

<Tukmakov--Zilberman, Nathan R (UKR-ch Kiev 1966) 25 C05 1-0>

Lombardy uses this game anonymously, introducing it with <"The second player's penchant for originality gets him into trouble">.

I often differ with Lombardy's analysis (of course I have engines, he didn't back in 1972). Sometimes I differ with his lack of analysis. For instance in the game mentioned at White's 17th move:

(White to play - premoves: 15...c4 16.b5 Na5)


click for larger view

Now White has a subtle move to find to win, a move I find impressive but Lombardy doesn't even comment on.

Here's RUSbase's version of the game (I should submit it to <CG> for game 2401):

[Event "Ch Ukraine"]
[Site "Kiev (Ukraine)"]
[Date "1966.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Tukmakov Vladimir B (UKR)"]
[Black "Zilberman Nathan R (KYR)"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C05"]
[Annotator ""]
[Source ""]
[Remark ""]

1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nd2 Nf6 4.e5 Nfd7 5.Bd3 c5 6.c3 Nc6 7.Ne2 f6 8.Nf4 Qe7 9.Nf3 fxe5 10.Ng6 hxg6 11.Bxg6+ Kd8 12.Bg5 Nf6 13.dxe5 Kc7 14.O-O Bd7 15.b4 c4 16.b5 Na5 17.Re1 Qd8 18.Qd4 Be7 19.exf6 gxf6 20.Bf4+ Kc8 21.Bf7 e5 22.Nxe5 fxe5 23.Qxe5 Bc5 24.Qxd5 Qb6 25.Rad1 1-0

May-11-15  Retireborn: <z> That game is in Informator (presumably where Lombardy got it from) but it is annotated very superficially (by Yudovich) and the strength of 17.Re1 attracts no praise there either. 21.Bf7 does get a ! though.
May-23-15  TheFocus: <In Dortmund, as well as in Leningrad and in Sochi, I played pretty well, but clearly I did not score high enough. It was something new: usually I had more points than I deserved. It seemed that I had matured as a chessplayer. My positional understanding got deeper, my opening knowledge had grown, and in general my game had become more balanced and versatile. At the same time, I had the feeling that something was important was gone for good. The mental tension that previously had never left me during the game was now replaced by a calm and sober view of the position. I was not sure if it was for better or for worse> - Vladimir Tukmakov, writing in Profession:Chessplayer.
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