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Karpov vs Anand, 1998
Lausanne

Under the leadership of Ilyumzhinov, FIDE scrapped the well established system of interzonal tournaments and candidate matches and replaced them with a completely different system. The new format involved a 100 player knockout tournament consisting of short 2 game matches, using blitz games as tiebreakers. The winner of this tournament would (after three days rest) play Karpov for the title in a 6 game mini-match. The tournament was held in Groningen, Netherlands in December, 1997. Viswanathan Anand, Kasparov's opponent in the 1995 PCA championship suceeded in winning the event beating Nikolic, Khalifman, Almasi, Shirov, Gelfand, and Adams.

 Viswanathan Anand
 Viswanathan ("Vishy") Anand
Anand's talent was indisputed, and by 1998 he was firmly established in the chess world as one of the most likely challengers to the world title. Rated 2770 (35 points higher than Karpov), and famously proficient at rapid chess, Anand would seem to be the favorite in this contest. However, the scheduling of the match caused great controversy regarding the fairness of the contest: Anand was forced to play a fresh and prepared Karpov a mere three days after his exhausting performance at Groningen.

The Karpov-Anand match was played at the International Olympic Committee (IOC) Museum in Lausanne, Switzerland in January 1998. It started just three days after Anand's last game in Groningen. Anand played Karpov in a 6 game match match. In the even of a 3-3 tie, the match would be decided by a series of 2-game rapid matches. Anand fell behind 2 games to 1 but summoned enough strength and won the sixth game to bring the match into overtime. Karpov, however, won 2 speed games and remained FIDE champion.


click on a game number to replay game 12345678
Karpov10½1½011
Anand01½0½100

FINAL SCORE:  Karpov 5;  Anand 3
Reference: game collection WCC Index [Karpov-Anand 1998]

NOTABLE GAMES   [what is this?]
    · Game #1     Karpov vs Anand, 1998     1-0
    · Game #6     Anand vs Karpov, 1998     1-0
    · Game #4     Anand vs Karpov, 1998     0-1

FOOTNOTES

  1. The World Chess Championships by Graeme Cree

 page 1 of 1; 2 games  PGN Download 
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. Karpov vs Anand ½-½201998Karpov - Anand FIDE World Championship MatchD45 Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav
2. Karpov vs Anand ½-½551998Karpov - Anand FIDE World Championship MatchD45 Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  

Kibitzer's Corner
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Oct-18-08  slomarko: <It's true that Isreal is doing terrible things.> its Israel and i disagree. sure Israel made some mistakes but saying that he's doing terrible things is hate speech.

<As Obama said "No one is suffering more than the palistinian people" and he's right.> how the hell would he know?

Nov-02-08  VaselineTopLove: <<As Obama said "No one is suffering more than the palistinian people" and he's right.>>

Actually Obama clarified this point on TV when he said that what he meant by the above quote is that the Palestinians are suffering at the hands of their own people - Suicide bombers/Islamic extremists, corrupt officials etc.

Nov-02-08  VaselineTopLove: The outcome of this match was a sad one - Anand losing in rapid out of fatigue. Had Anand won this, I'm sure we would have seen a Kasparov-Anand re-unification match.
Nov-02-08  Vishy but not Anand: That was how FIDE is dictated by Russians and Anand is not Russian.

Karpov and his team were known to have so much influence in FIDE even way back Fischer's time. Karpov was very happy taking the crown of Fischer by forfeit.

Russians made sure that Karpov will never be like Spassky who was so gentleman who rather play chess win or loss for the crown. So they are more than happy for the opportunity to grab it back from Fischer by forfeit the better (equivalent to 100% no lose situation)

Nov-02-08  KamikazeAttack: Yeah, the Russians were also responsible for killing Santa Claus.
Nov-06-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  amadeus: Not much information on the match, but interesting. Patzer's Paradise: http://www.chesscafe.com/text/hans1...

This one is mostly about Las Palmas 1996, but a good reading too: http://www.chesscafe.com/text/hans0...

Btw, I have a collection concerning the whole Groningen KO: Game Collection: 1997 Groningen Candidates Tournament

Jun-03-09  WhiteRook48: This was to demonstrate that "the best minds live under the communist system, blah blah blah."
Jul-20-10  macartus: Creo que Karpov a sido un jugador fuera de serie pero desafortuna- damente para el las ocaciones que a ganado los match por el titulo mundial han sido de dudosa forma ya sea por favoritismo de la FIDE o por que sus rivales vienen agotados, pero a un asi su legado en el juego a sido muy valioso y didactico.
Apr-24-11  musicmanTRIBALx: someone should edit the description. typos abound!
Apr-24-11  I play the Fred: <Under the leadership of Kirsan Ilyumzhinov, FIDE scrapped the well-established Interzonal/Candidates system and replaced it with a 100-player knockout tournament. The new format consisted of two-game matches with blitz games serving as tiebreakers. The winner of the knockout would then play reigning FIDE champion Anatoly Karpov for the title in a six-game match. The tournament was held in Groningen, Netherlands in December, 1997. Viswanathan Anand, Kasparov's opponent in the 1995 PCA championship, won the knockout after beating Nikolic, Khalifman, Almasi, Shirov, Gelfand, and Adams.

Anand's natural talent was undisputed, and by 1998 he was firmly established as one of the most likely challengers for the world title. Rated 2770 (thirty-five points higher than Karpov) and famously proficient at rapid chess, Anand was regarded by many as the favorite in this contest. However, the controversial scheduling of the match seemed unfair to the challenger - Anand was forced to play a fresh and prepared Karpov just three days after his exhausting victory in the knockout.

The Karpov-Anand match was played at the International Olympic Committee (IOC) Museum in Lausanne, Switzerland in January 1998. In the event of a tie score, the title would be decided by a series of two-game rapid matches. Anand fell behind two games to one but summoned enough strength to win the sixth game and bring the match into overtime. But Karpov won two speed games and retained the FIDE World Championship.>

I did this quick little edit/rewrite. If you want to use it, feel free.

May-04-11  musicmanTRIBALx: <I play the Fred>:
umm, thanks? by "someone" i guess i meant "someone who can actually edit the description". i thought that went without saying...
May-31-12  RookFile: What a short match!
Jul-01-13  Everett: Karpov missed an opportunity to put Anand in a deep hole in game 2 Anand vs Karpov, 1998
Feb-26-14  schweigzwang: Dear chessgames.com: It appears that the FIDE Champs "next" link up there skips over the 1999 page and goes directly to 2000. The 2000 page's "previous" does point back to 1999, however.
Mar-30-15  kummatmebro: You can tell how rigged this match was especially bringing a tired Anand to the match.

Look at the Anand Karpov head to head score… Anand has Karpov buried.

Mar-30-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: what nonsense, <kum> Anand is 20 years younger. Of course the head to head favors the younger man. Karpov was world champion for ten years, and top five for 20 years. Anand is good, but not THAT good.
Nov-04-15  kamagong24: we need another Max Euwe to restore order and common sense to FIDE, yes, blitz matches are entertaining, but use it to determine a world champion??? if so, the winner should not be called a 'World Champion' but rather a 'blitz world champion' kirsan should ride his spaceship and play chess with the annunakis'
Nov-04-15  Petrosianic: Max Euwe, nothing. I'd take another Fridrik Olafsson. He was FIDE's last decent President.
Jan-23-17  todicav23: So many excuses for Anand. He knew ahead of time the schedule. Karpov was already 47 and way past his prime but he still managed to win the match. We all know who was the greater player.
Jan-02-18  Everett: Of note, game 2 saw Karpov missing a few wins. He could have been up 2-0 in a 6 game match. Pretty tough to come back from that.
May-06-18  ClockPunchingMonkey: Strange to me that Karpov won this match. Good for him.
May-06-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: Had the match been played with even a bit of time to allow Anand a respite, rather than the onerous conditions which were the case, the outcome may well have been different; but we shall never know.

It is to Anand's credit that he fought back to force overtime, despite his eventual defeat.

May-06-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: < The winner of this tournament would (after three days rest) play Karpov for the title in a 6 game mini-match.>

Actually, only two days' rest. If Anand had beaten Adams without requiring the playoff, he would have earned the additional luxury.

Apr-06-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  amadeus: The game listed as #3 is actually a blindfold game from Amber. This is the correct one: Karpov vs Anand, 1998
Aug-02-19  Chesgambit: If Kramnik play aganist Karpov he can become world champion
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