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Karpov vs Timman, 1993
Zwolle, Arnhem, Amsterdam, and Djakarta

 Karpov and Timman
 Cover art for Schach-WM 1993 by Pfleger and Metz
This match, played in various cities in the Netherlands, took place in the shadows of the Kasparov-Short World Championship. FIDE continued their world championship cycle as if the depature of Garry Kasparov had never happened. Karpov and Timman were chosen to play, as they were the players who had gone the farthest in the candidates cycle. (Yusupov may have also been considered an equally rightful participant, but was excluded by FIDE decision.)

Jan Timman had always been in the forefront of Dutch chess, and consistantly ranked among the world's elite. Although the significance of this match was questionable, it was nevertheless an exciting event for the Netherland's countless chess fans.

Known flippantly in some circles as "The Battle of the Losers" this match attracted little financial backing and little interest in the chess world. Most people regarded Kasparov (still unbeaten and still actively playing) as the real champion. Nevertheless, the FIDE Championship continued to exist as a separate title.[1]

After 21 games, with a score of 12½ to 8½, Karpov became the 1993 FIDE World Chess Champion.

click on a game number to replay game 123456789101112131415161718192021
Timman01½½½0½½½0½½½000½½½1½
Karpov10½½½1½½½1½½½111½½½0½

FINAL SCORE:  Karpov 12½;  Timman 8½
Reference: game collection WCC Index [Karpov-Timman 1993]

NOTABLE GAMES   [what is this?]
    · Game #6     Karpov vs Timman, 1993     1-0
    · Game #15     Timman vs Karpov, 1993     0-1
    · Game #16     Karpov vs Timman, 1993     1-0

FOOTNOTES

  1. The World Chess Championships by Graeme Cree

 page 1 of 1; 21 games  PGN Download 
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. Timman vs Karpov 0-1561993Karpov - Timman FIDE World Championship MatchB17 Caro-Kann, Steinitz Variation
2. Karpov vs Timman 0-1461993Karpov - Timman FIDE World Championship MatchE15 Queen's Indian
3. Timman vs Karpov ½-½491993Karpov - Timman FIDE World Championship MatchB17 Caro-Kann, Steinitz Variation
4. Karpov vs Timman ½-½201993Karpov - Timman FIDE World Championship MatchD39 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin, Vienna Variation
5. Timman vs Karpov ½-½551993Karpov - Timman FIDE World Championship MatchA29 English, Four Knights, Kingside Fianchetto
6. Karpov vs Timman 1-0331993Karpov - Timman FIDE World Championship MatchD39 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin, Vienna Variation
7. Timman vs Karpov ½-½211993Karpov - Timman FIDE World Championship MatchB17 Caro-Kann, Steinitz Variation
8. Karpov vs Timman ½-½281993Karpov - Timman FIDE World Championship MatchD39 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin, Vienna Variation
9. Timman vs Karpov ½-½491993Karpov - Timman FIDE World Championship MatchA46 Queen's Pawn Game
10. Karpov vs Timman 1-0531993Karpov - Timman FIDE World Championship MatchD85 Grunfeld
11. Timman vs Karpov ½-½111993Karpov - Timman FIDE World Championship MatchE15 Queen's Indian
12. Karpov vs Timman ½-½511993Karpov - Timman FIDE World Championship MatchD79 Neo-Grunfeld, 6.O-O, Main line
13. Timman vs Karpov ½-½271993Karpov - Timman FIDE World Championship MatchA07 King's Indian Attack
14. Karpov vs Timman 1-0531993Karpov - Timman FIDE World Championship MatchD39 Queen's Gambit Declined, Ragozin, Vienna Variation
15. Timman vs Karpov 0-1341993Karpov - Timman FIDE World Championship MatchE32 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
16. Karpov vs Timman 1-0591993Karpov - Timman FIDE World Championship MatchE81 King's Indian, Samisch
17. Timman vs Karpov ½-½331993Karpov - Timman FIDE World Championship MatchB12 Caro-Kann Defense
18. Karpov vs Timman ½-½381993Karpov - Timman FIDE World Championship MatchE81 King's Indian, Samisch
19. Timman vs Karpov ½-½431993Karpov - Timman FIDE World Championship MatchE12 Queen's Indian
20. Karpov vs Timman 0-1401993Karpov - Timman FIDE World Championship MatchA33 English, Symmetrical
21. Timman vs Karpov ½-½191993Karpov - Timman FIDE World Championship MatchE32 Nimzo-Indian, Classical
 page 1 of 1; 21 games  PGN Download 
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 8 OF 8 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jun-04-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Honza Cervenka: <unferth> I can't read French but Winter describes it thus:

<In the May 1986 Europe Echecs (pages 300-301) Jacques Le Monnier reported that before her death Grace Alekhine had passed a number of her late husband’s notebooks to a friend (unnamed). In 1958 Le Monnier was given access to the material and found, word for word and in Alekhine’s own handwriting, the text of the first anti-Semitic article, which had appeared in Pariser Zeitung of 18 March 1941. The word ‘Jew’ was almost invariably underlined, Le Monnier reported.>

That's really a strange story to put it mildly. One has to ask here not only why he waited with such a disclosure so long and why he had written in 1973 that "we will never know", but also why would Grace Alekhine, who defended her late husband up to her death, preserve and pass to anybody such a incriminating material? She was not ignorant on chess being several times Paris lady champion, and she would hardly forgot to read carefully, what she was giving away. It doesn't sound much believable to me.

Jun-05-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Honza Cervenka: Well, back to this match. I have found in the Czech journal Šachinfo, 6/93 a report written by Bretislav Modr, where he states that Timman was seeded into the match as finalist of the Candidate, and Karpov as a semifinalist with the highest ELO rating at the time.
Jun-05-12  LoveThatJoker: <Honza> This is an excellent post!

I haven't heard from GM Yusupov despite having sent an e-mail to the address on his website. Oh well, no big deal.

I saw a video on the 1993 Kasparov-Short Match - it was phenomenal!

Very entertaining match!

LTJ

Jun-05-12  uscfratingmybyear: <call me TC> "There were no hostilities in 1939, and as king of chess he probably felt entitled to remain castled behind the front ranks." By 1939 Germany had already taken Poland, France was at war with Germany and the British were landing troops in France and fighting along side the French.
Jun-05-12  unferth: Germany didn't invade Poland until September 1939, and there was little fighting on the Western front for many months. until May 1940, many people believed the war would be settled quickly with few casualties in the West.
Jun-06-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: <LoveThatJoker> re Yusupov in 1993

I've checked all 1993 issues of the German chess magazines "Schach-Report" and "Rochade Europa", but there was no comment/interview etc re his 'exclusion' from the Fide WC.

Additional thoughts:

- There was only a small timeframe for Fide for a decision (to get a championchip up in the same year as the Kasparov-Short match (for legitimacy reasons)).

- Therefore a new 'candidate match' with Timman, Karpov and Yusupov wouldn't work.

- If I'm not mistaken back in 1993 Yusupov though living in Germany was still with the Russian chess federation - who without doubt were 100% Karpov supporters.

In 1st half of 1993 Yusupov played a few of tournaments with mixed results, he wrote a new book of his series with Dvoretsky and his family had an addition - so it seems to me that he had made the best out of the situation.

Jun-06-12  LoveThatJoker: <whiteshark> Thanks a lot for your kind reply, man! I remember I asked you that over a week ago. I'm genuinely thankful that you remembered!

LTJ

Aug-24-13  offramp: This must be one of the most incongruous web pages to have a discussion about the Alekhine Nazi articles.
Jun-20-15  zanzibar: What <offramp> said.
Nov-04-15  Mr. V: So, what were the requirements to win the match? This seems like an important thing to be missing from an introduction.
Nov-07-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  thegoodanarchist: Timman was completely outclassed, losing by -4, yet both wins were with the Black pieces.

I find that quite intriguing.

May-27-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  alexmagnus: Both 1993 matches featured the largest and second largest Elo difference in a WC match ever, including all the disputed matches and FIDE KO finals.

Kasparov-Short: 150 points difference
Karpov-Timman: 140 points difference.

May-27-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: <alexmagnus>
Although there were no Elo ratings in 1910, surely Lasker - Janowski World Championship Match (1910) is worth a mention when discussing the largest strength gaps in a WC match.

Edochess rankings (1910): Lasker 2732, Janowsky 2511, gap 221 points

Chessmetrics rankings (Nov. 1910): Lasker 2820, Janowsky 2647, gap 173 points

Sep-02-22  Allanur: With my current mind, I think I would have never ever played this match. It is just like accepting remnants of someone's fame. Especially for a person who had career of Karpov, it us unacceptable.

You were World Chess Champion for 10 years, you dominated tournaments, you were beaten in the semi-final of the current championship cycle - the chance for championship has been brought in front of you. And you take it?

Karpov... Karpov... You were the man that was resenting to assume the championship by default even if it was not your fault - 18 years later, you are almost begging for the title. Pity...

Sep-02-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: Timman did win two games.

The blame falls on Kasparov, for turning professional chess into professional wrestling.

Sep-02-22  thebully99: This match was illegitimate.

You can't have a world championship match between losers.

You can only have a match between winners.

Sep-03-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  plang: There are other examples - for instance Kramnik "earned" his shot against Kasparov after losing his match to Shirov.
Sep-03-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  Williebob: You can call it a "FIDE World Championship" without claiming the winner is the best player in the world - Khalifman said as much after winning his title. But, of course, nobody will like that title applied to anyone who isn't the #1 rated player, or very close to achieving it. (Kramnik being an interesting exception, ranking #1 only briefly in years he wasn't WC).

The FIDE matches and tournaments during the Kasparov Insurrection were great events, chess-wise. The titles were an unfortunate distraction, but then what else could FIDE have done during that period? Credibility was on the line!
Sep-03-22  nok: <you were beaten in the semi-final...>

Kasparov might have lost a semifinal too, had he played it. We'll never know.

Sep-03-22  Olavi: <thebully99: This match was illegitimate. You can't have a world championship match between losers.

You can only have a match between winners.>

Wrong. FIDE's rules catered for all possibilities of Champion, Challenger and their substitutes refusing to play the match. Kasparov and Short refused.

<plang: There are other examples - for instance Kramnik "earned" his shot against Kasparov after losing his match to Shirov.>

Shirov - Kramnik and Kasparov - Kramnik were played under two completely different organizations. Brain Games, the organizers of K-K London 2000, had no responsibilities at all towards Shirov. There is no connection.

Sep-03-22  thebully99: < Wrong. FIDE's rules catered for all possibilities of Champion, Challenger and their substitutes refusing to play the match. Kasparov and Short refused. >

Kasparov and Short had major disputes with the way corrupt FIDE was arranging the match, which led them to form their own association.

It's a fact that Short won an official, undisputed Candidates tournament whereas Karpov and Timman lost (Karpov didn't even make it to the finals).

It's a fact that Kasparov was the world's strongest player.

A match between those who lost the Candidates can never be legitimate. That's like having a 2023 title match between 3rd place Hikaru Nakamura and 2nd place Ding Liren. Complete devaluing of the title.

Sep-03-22
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: But what did you expect FIDE to do in response? Meekly cave in and simply hand over the keys to the world title to Kasparov? Forget Short, he was merely along for the ride.

The PCA, of course, was never arguing that it should completely replace FIDE and its constituent national/regional bodies. They envisaged FIDE continuing largely as before - organising the Olympiads, championships for women, seniors, juniors, etc., training arbiters, awarding titles - in other words, all the necessary and humdrum administrative work. They merely wanted to skim the lucrative cream off the glamorous top.

Sep-04-22  Olavi: Clearly Kasparov and Carlsen must be declared Champions for Life, with absolute control of all things Chess World Championship, with neither claim devaluing the other's title in any way. Thank God Bobby died.
Sep-04-22  RookFile: Fischer should have done what Kasparov did. Just play matches outside of FIDE. He could have arranged a match with Gligoric in 10 minutes, but better still would have been a Korchnoi match. I think either one of these guys would have agreed to play by Fischer's rules.
Sep-04-22  Olavi: The Gligoric - Fischer match was made in 1978, Bobby came to Belgrad in 1978, then backed off. Therefore Gligoric was no longer so keen on winning the FIDE presidential election in Buenos Aires, and Olafsson was a good choice.
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