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Carlsen - Caruana World Championship Match (2018)

The World Championship 2018 between reigning world champion since 2013, Magnus Carlsen, and challenger Fabiano Caruana, a 12-game match organized by FIDE and its commercial partner Agon, was played in London, at The College in Holborn, 9-28 November. Caruana qualified as challenger at the World Championship Candidates (2018). The time control was 100 minutes for the first 40 moves, then 50 more minutes for the next 20 moves, and 15 more minutes for the rest of the game, with a 30-second increment per move from move 1. Colors alternated between games except after game 6, so the same player played with White in games 6 and 7. Draw agreements were not allowed before Black's 30th move. If the match was tied 6-6 after 12 games, tiebreak games would be played on 28 November to determine the winner, starting with a best-of-four Rapid match at 25 minutes per player with a 10-second increment; if still tied, up to five two-game Blitz minimatches at 5 minutes per player with a 3-second increment, the winner of any minimatch winning the championship. If still tied, an Armageddon game to determine the champion. All Classical games, and the first Rapid tiebreak game, began at 15:00 UTC (10:00 USA/Eastern). Ten-minute breaks between tiebreak games were stipulated in the regulations but could be waived by the chief arbiter Stephane Escafre.

After 12 consecutive draws in the Classical games, Carlsen won the first three Rapid tiebreak games and defended the title for the third time.

Elo Classical Rapid Carlsen 2835 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 1 9 Caruana 2832 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 0 0 6

Official site: https://web.archive.org/web/2018113...
Regulations: https://www.fide.com/FIDE/handbook/...
Scheduling: https://worldchess.com/tournament/1...
Chess.com 1: https://www.chess.com/article/view/...
Chess.com 2: https://www.chess.com/article/view/...
ChessBase: https://en.chessbase.com/post/magnu...
chess24: https://chess24.com/en/watch/live-t...
TWIC: https://theweekinchess.com/chessnew...
FIDE: https://ratings.fide.com/tournament...

Previous: Carlsen - Karjakin World Championship Match (2016)

 page 1 of 1; 15 games  PGN Download 
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. Caruana vs Carlsen ½-½1152018Carlsen - Caruana World Championship MatchB31 Sicilian, Rossolimo Variation
2. Carlsen vs Caruana ½-½492018Carlsen - Caruana World Championship MatchD37 Queen's Gambit Declined
3. Caruana vs Carlsen ½-½492018Carlsen - Caruana World Championship MatchB31 Sicilian, Rossolimo Variation
4. Carlsen vs Caruana ½-½342018Carlsen - Caruana World Championship MatchA29 English, Four Knights, Kingside Fianchetto
5. Caruana vs Carlsen ½-½332018Carlsen - Caruana World Championship MatchB31 Sicilian, Rossolimo Variation
6. Carlsen vs Caruana ½-½802018Carlsen - Caruana World Championship MatchC42 Petrov Defense
7. Carlsen vs Caruana ½-½402018Carlsen - Caruana World Championship MatchD37 Queen's Gambit Declined
8. Caruana vs Carlsen ½-½382018Carlsen - Caruana World Championship MatchB33 Sicilian
9. Carlsen vs Caruana ½-½562018Carlsen - Caruana World Championship MatchA29 English, Four Knights, Kingside Fianchetto
10. Caruana vs Carlsen ½-½542018Carlsen - Caruana World Championship MatchB33 Sicilian
11. Carlsen vs Caruana ½-½552018Carlsen - Caruana World Championship MatchC42 Petrov Defense
12. Caruana vs Carlsen ½-½312018Carlsen - Caruana World Championship MatchB33 Sicilian
13. Carlsen vs Caruana 1-0512018Carlsen - Caruana World Championship MatchB40 Sicilian
14. Caruana vs Carlsen 0-1282018Carlsen - Caruana World Championship MatchB33 Sicilian
15. Carlsen vs Caruana 1-0552018Carlsen - Caruana World Championship MatchA22 English
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 132 OF 132 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Oct-16-19  Chesgambit: Caruana plays solid
Oct-25-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <<john barleycorn> Now, of course, it would be interesting to see how "Fischer" rules (10 to win, 9-9) would do?>

I just noticed this and, OK, you aroused my curiosity. But not only will it take several pages to post my response but it is really off-topic for this page so I've posted my findings on my forum starting at AylerKupp chessforum (kibitz #1537).

<WARNING> It's a 9-part post so it is longer than my usual "concise" posts. :-) As Dante might have said, "Abandon all hope ye who enter there."

Feb-11-20  1d410: Why is this hidden it is almost not worth finding it it is so hard. I smell corruption.
Feb-11-20  Carrots and Pizza: I followed this match very closely and found it highly entertaining. It was hard fought, most of the way through, and showed some interesting creativity and new lines. I was really pulling for Caruana because I want an American champion again, but Magnus won the coin toss so he remained champ. I like Magnus too.
Feb-11-20  parmetd: What coin toss might that be?
Feb-12-20  Carrots and Pizza: < parmetd: What coin toss might that be?>

The blitz games. I consider blitz a chess variant.

Feb-12-20  Muttley101: <Carrots and Pizza: < parmetd: What coin toss might that be?> The blitz games. I consider blitz a chess variant.>

Except it was rapid games, not blitz, and rapid with 25 minutes main time with 10 second increment (rather than the shorter 15 or 10 minute main in some events). All the same, a world championship in classical chess shoukd be decided by wins in classical chess, no?

Feb-12-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  Messiah: <Tabanus: I have emails from Henrik Carlsen for sale.>

Elaborate please.

Feb-12-20  Lambda: There's nothing coin toss-y about rapid or blitz. They are decided by skill just as much as classical, that's why different players have very different rapid and blitz ratings just like they do in classical. The objection to tie breaking short-ish classical matches with faster games is that if there's a high probability of the winner being decided in rapid or blitz, it's not really a classical match any more.
Feb-12-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <<Lambda> The objection to tie breaking short-ish classical matches with faster games is that if there's a high probability of the winner being decided in rapid or blitz, it's not really a classical match any more.>

But length of match has nothing to do with it. Sure, the more games in the Classic portion of the match the lower the probability that the score will be tied at the end since the stronger player is more likely to prevail. And once the score is tied at the end of the match, if faster games are used as a tie breaker, it's not really a classical match any more either.

Back in the days of 24-game matches 3 out of 16 (18.8%) ended in a 12-12 score (Botvinnik - Bronstein World Championship Match (1951), Botvinnik - Smyslov World Championship Match (1954), Kasparov - Karpov World Championship Rematch (1986)) and the winner decided by the clause that the champion retains his title in case of a draw. So clearly 24 games is not sufficient to completely avoid this issue.

In any fixed-length match the probability of the match ending in a tie is never zero. So how many games are sufficient in order to determine the better player in a fixed-length match in a statistically significant way? I don't know, and I haven't yet figured out a way to calculate it. I suspect that the number of games required would be smaller the greater the rating difference between the two player since the stronger of the two would have a higher scoring probability. But I'm not sure.

If that were the case then, given the 3-point rating differential between these two players at the time the match was held, this match might still be going on.

Feb-12-20  RookFile: Caruana kept playing it safe. You don't get to be champ by doing that. He had to take chances and get a victory in that 12 game set. As we saw, he had no chance in the rapid section. By playing it safe, he guaranteed himself a respectable loss.
Feb-12-20  0o0o0o0o0: I won't pretend for a second that I had any depth of understanding in any of the games that they played.Instead I looked towards commentaries that I respect. When I watched these it became clear that Carlsen was preferable for a win in the 1st and last game. As I remember, Caruana was not particularly favorable in any of the 12. This makes me think that spectators need to look a little beyond the classical result.

For example, I like soccer/football, sometimes a weaker team earns a draw, but the stronger team have hit the goal posts 2 times, the weaker team did not have a shot on goal, yet it is a draw.

In chess, not all draws are equal, but the rewards are.

Feb-12-20  SChesshevsky: <Caruana kept playing it safe...> Certainly seems that way. Especially when compared to Carlsen's astonishing use of the Sveshnikov. Don't think it's ever been used in a world championship. Maybe not even in any WC related match.

Think if Caruana was willing to really battle, and maybe go down in flames, he would've at least tried the white Bg5 line.

Feb-13-20  fabelhaft: <<parmetd: What coin toss might that be?> The blitz games. I consider blitz a chess variant>

Carlsen sure is lucky with the coin tosses, 5 wins and 2 draws (missing a win in one of them) in 7 played ”chess variant blitz” rapid tiebreak games.

Feb-13-20  rcs784: <SChesshevsky> I believe the Sveshnikov was played in the 2012 Anand-Gelfand WC match. Maybe others, too.
Feb-18-20  RookFile: Technically, you can say that Lasker used it against Schlechter, too, although the latter chose a quiet line with white.
Apr-24-20  Eisenheim: I’m not sure if anyone’s ever flushed out this quirky fact. But is Caruana the only player who played in a world championship to be able to say that he never lost a game in normal time format during championship play. For example, Carlson can’t say this since he lost a games in other world championships.
Apr-24-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  moronovich: Good call-sounds like you are right <Eisenheim> !
Apr-24-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  Messiah: <Eisenheim: I’m not sure if anyone’s ever flushed out this quirky fact. But is Caruana the only player who played in a world championship to be able to say that he never lost a game in normal time format during championship play. For example, Carlson can’t say this since he lost a games in other world championships.> Interesting! And now, that I am thinking about it, must be true.

(Let's make jokes about Khalifman and Ponomariov.)

Apr-24-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <<Eisenheim> I’m not sure if anyone’s ever flushed out this quirky fact. But is Caruana the only player who played in a world championship to be able to say that he never lost a game in normal time format during championship play.>

No. Lasker in Lasker - Marshall World Championship Match (1907) and Lasker - Janowski World Championship Match (1910) went undefeated. Likewise Capablanca in Lasker - Capablanca World Championship Match (1921), Kramnik in Kasparov - Kramnik Classical World Championship Match (2000), Anand in Anand - Kramnik World Championship Match (2008), and Carlsen in Anand - Carlsen World Championship Match (2013). So, yes, Carlsen can say that he never lost a game in normal (i.e. Classic) time format during championship play.

If you meant to ask whether any <challenger> went undefeated in classic time format during championship play the answer is still no. Capablanca in 1921, Kramnik in 2000, and Carlsen in 2013 all were undefeated as challengers in their WCC matches against defending champions Lasker, Kasparov, and Anand respectively.

Apr-24-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  nok: One counterexample disproves a proposition. Give two and you're on the wordy side.
Apr-24-20  Eisenheim: I’m referring to the anomaly of the cumulative. Not a single world championship match. Lasker for example lost a game in normal time format to Steinitz so he wouldn’t qualify. Carlsen lost a game to Karjakin and Anand if I remember. Kramink lost a game to Topalov etc. So none of them would qualify under my trivia. Anyone else?
Apr-24-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: <Eisenheim>
Are you counting the FIDE title during the split-title era? For example Ponomariov played Ponomariov-Ivanchuk for the 2002 final without losing a game, and no other title matches.
Apr-25-20  Petrosianic: The FIDE Title wasn't the world title. And even if it had been, Ponomariov lost a game to Morozevich in that tournament.
Apr-25-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: <Petrosianic>

<The FIDE Title wasn't the world title.> The FIDE title did indeed claim to be of world scope. Whether it was legitimate or not is a matter of debate. I happen to share your opinion, but what I asked for now is <Eisenheim>'s opinion.

<Ponomariov lost a game to Morozevich in that tournament.> Yes, and in 2018 Caruana also lost a game to Karjakin in the tournament that qualified him for the final. We are discussing the <match> between the two finalists, are we not?

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