chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

🏆
MATCH STANDINGS
Ju - Goryachkina Women's World Championship Match

Ju Wenjun8.5/16(+4 -3 =9)[games]
Aleksandra Goryachkina7.5/16(+3 -4 =9)[games]

Chessgames.com Chess Event Description
Ju - Goryachkina Women's World Championship Match (2020)

The 2020 FIDE Women's World Chess Championship was a 12-game match between Chinese reigning champion Ju Wenjun and Russian challenger Aleksandra Goryachkina, who had won the FIDE Candidates (Women) (2019) tournament. The first six games were played in Shanghai, China (5-12 January) and the remaining games in Vladivostok, Russia (15-24 January). The prize fund was 500,000 euros, split 55:45 due to the match reaching playoffs (else it would have been 60:40). The players received 90 minutes for the first 40 moves, followed by 30 minutes for the rest of the game, with 30 seconds added per move from move one. No draw offers were allowed before move 40. Tiebreaks were four 25+10 rapid games, that would have been followed if necessary by up to 5 pairs of 5+3 blitz games and an Armageddon game. Chief arbiter: Shohreh Bayat. Deputy chief arbiter: Marika Japaridze.

After 6-6 in the Classical games, Ju Wenjun won the Rapid tiebreak games and defended her title for the second time.

Classical Rapid Elo 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 1 2 3 4 Ju Wenjun 2584 ˝ ˝ ˝ 1 0 ˝ ˝ 0 1 1 ˝ 0 ˝ ˝ 1 ˝ 8˝ Goryachkina 2578 ˝ ˝ ˝ 0 1 ˝ ˝ 1 0 0 ˝ 1 ˝ ˝ 0 ˝ 7˝

Official site: https://wwcm2020.fide.com/
Regulations: https://handbook.fide.com/files/han...
Chess.com: https://www.chess.com/news/view/202...
ChessBase: https://en.chessbase.com/post/women...
Chess24: https://chess24.com/en/watch/live-t...
TWIC: https://theweekinchess.com/chessnew...
FIDE 1: https://ratings.fide.com/tournament...
FIDE 2: https://ratings.fide.com/tournament...
Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0KP...
Wikipedia article: Women's World Chess Championship 2020

Previous: Women's World Championship Knockout Tournament (2018)

 page 1 of 1; 16 games  PGN Download 
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. Goryachkina vs Ju Wenjun ½-½972020Ju - Goryachkina Women's World Championship MatchD37 Queen's Gambit Declined
2. Ju Wenjun vs Goryachkina ½-½402020Ju - Goryachkina Women's World Championship MatchC67 Ruy Lopez
3. Goryachkina vs Ju Wenjun ½-½852020Ju - Goryachkina Women's World Championship MatchD41 Queen's Gambit Declined, Semi-Tarrasch
4. Ju Wenjun vs Goryachkina 1-0632020Ju - Goryachkina Women's World Championship MatchD16 Queen's Gambit Declined Slav
5. Goryachkina vs Ju Wenjun 1-0512020Ju - Goryachkina Women's World Championship MatchA18 English, Mikenas-Carls
6. Ju Wenjun vs Goryachkina ½-½1052020Ju - Goryachkina Women's World Championship MatchC67 Ruy Lopez
7. Ju Wenjun vs Goryachkina ½-½672020Ju - Goryachkina Women's World Championship MatchC65 Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defense
8. Goryachkina vs Ju Wenjun 1-0452020Ju - Goryachkina Women's World Championship MatchD35 Queen's Gambit Declined
9. Ju Wenjun vs Goryachkina 1-0622020Ju - Goryachkina Women's World Championship MatchA06 Reti Opening
10. Goryachkina vs Ju Wenjun 0-1622020Ju - Goryachkina Women's World Championship MatchD35 Queen's Gambit Declined
11. Ju Wenjun vs Goryachkina ½-½402020Ju - Goryachkina Women's World Championship MatchC67 Ruy Lopez
12. Goryachkina vs Ju Wenjun 1-0602020Ju - Goryachkina Women's World Championship MatchD02 Queen's Pawn Game
13. Ju Wenjun vs Goryachkina  ½-½672020Ju - Goryachkina Women's World Championship MatchA06 Reti Opening
14. Goryachkina vs Ju Wenjun ½-½722020Ju - Goryachkina Women's World Championship MatchD35 Queen's Gambit Declined
15. Ju Wenjun vs Goryachkina 1-0452020Ju - Goryachkina Women's World Championship MatchA06 Reti Opening
16. Goryachkina vs Ju Wenjun  ½-½772020Ju - Goryachkina Women's World Championship MatchD35 Queen's Gambit Declined
 page 1 of 1; 16 games  PGN Download 
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 6 OF 6 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jan-24-20  jphamlore: Especially with 4 and not 2 rapid games, I think the superior rapid player will grind down the weaker.
Jan-24-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sokrates: I agree with you, <Count>, that Ju Wenjun is likely to win the tie-breaker. They can't play on forever, a winner has to be found, but regardless of the tie-breaker, I think both women have great honour of this match; it offered exciting fighting games and a constant tension in the match stand.

Both players had their moments of triumph, and although AG probably loses in the end, she can walk away with her head held high. Ju will by no means be an undeserved winner - she is a great world champion.

Jan-24-20  JimNorCal: How can AG be so easily discarded? In these high tension events, sometimes youth will triumph.
Jan-24-20  JimNorCal: Game 1, AG had a better position and more time but they drifted to a draw. JWJ will be glad to have survived but she's spent one of her whites.
Jan-24-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: These text commentaries really bring the match alive.
Jan-24-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: On my computer I am watching the third rapid game, and listening to the cricket from Port Elizabeth on Radio2000 (start delayed: rain) AND I have <The Super Inframan> on the telly!

JACKPOT!

Jan-24-20  JimNorCal: WJW wins game 3 of the rapids, AG must win game 4 to continue. She has white and an open position ...
Jan-24-20  chessmoron: Goryachkina should be very proud.
Jan-24-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sokrates: AG in a slightly better endgame position, but enough to win - it would be on a very close margin.
Jan-24-20  JimNorCal: JWJ holds the draw as both players are reduced to playing on increment. She holds her title.
Congrats AG for a spirited challenge!
Jan-24-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  Octavia: well done, Wenjun Ju !!!
Jan-24-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sokrates: Yes of course, Ju Wenjun is the winner, congratulations are absolutely in order. She is a worthy world champion, indisputably.

I feel a bit sorry for AG, though. She was so close - you couldn't get closer, in fact.

But this was a great match that gave honour to the players and lots of prestige to the world championship of women. Well done, both of them.

Jan-24-20  dumbgai: < you couldn't get closer, in fact.>

I’m still waiting for the day when a world championship match (women’s or overall) is decided with a draw in an Armageddon game.

Jan-24-20  JimNorCal: In the post game interview JWJ stated she felt she was lost in game 1 of the Rapid playoff.

That's how close it came ...

Jan-24-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  Check It Out: Congrats Ju Wenjun! A great match full of ups and downs.
Jan-24-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: Is anyone out there prepared to admit they'd never heard of Goryachkina before this match began?

Copy and co-sign below:

User: MissScarlett

Jan-24-20  JimNorCal: Copy and co-sign below:

User: MissScarlett
User: JimNorCal

Jan-24-20  botvinnik64: A great match, plenty of ups and downs, mistakes heartaches. Yes, this chess fan had heard of AG (well) before this match: she has been playing in the strongest Open tournaments she can find for the last 5-6 years. My feeling going into this match was that this experience in Open company gave her a real shot against a very strong Champ. Congratulations WenJu! You survived. In chess that's often enough.
Jan-24-20  notyetagm: <MissScarlett: Is anyone out there prepared to admit they'd never heard of Goryachkina before this match began?>

She dominated the FIDE Candidates (Women) (2019).

FIDE Candidates (Women) (2019)/Aleksandra Goryachkina

She went <+6 =7 -0> in the first 13 rounds to win the tournament running away and then lost her last game which meant nothing.

Jan-24-20  dumbgai: Yeah AG has shot up the world rankings with lots of excellent results. She will definitely be back in the future. As of right now I would consider her the favorite to win the candidates tournament.
Jan-25-20  Tal1949: I am still surprised that Ju defended her title. She was outplayed in Shanghai in the first half and looked to be playing scrambling, defensive chess. Her openings and middle game were very lackluster for a world champ.

The turning point was when Gorya missed the strong continuation in game nine (27..Qb4) and suddenly the match was lost. Really it was just those critical moments where the game is hanging in the air is all that counts. She was that close. Fischer, Kasparov and Carlsen seize that moment- the rest miss it. Gorya lost game 9 and 10 and it was all over.

Once it got to the rapids- not surprising there- Ju is a better player in that format.

Jun-13-20  jith1207: So, is it WJW or JWJ?
Jul-23-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  carpovius: <MissScarlett: Is anyone out there prepared to admit they'd never heard of Goryachkina before this match began?>

I prepare to admit that'd never heard about Ju before this match began. Who's she/he, who taught it to play chess, when and where???

Jul-23-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  WannaBe: <jith1207> Ju is the family name.

http://ratings.fide.com/card.phtml?...

<carpovius> The title of this page on top says Women's Championship, and you are not sure if she/he?!

She won in 2018, so she (Ju) is 2x champion.

Jul-23-20  JimNorCal: "So, is it WJW or JWJ?"

Ju Wen Jun is where the JWJ is coming from. Since Ju is her surname/lastname I guess Euro cultures could call her WJJ

Jump to page #    (enter # from 1 to 6)
search thread:   
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 6 OF 6 ·  Later Kibitzing>

NOTE: Create an account today to post replies and access other powerful features which are available only to registered users. Becoming a member is free, anonymous, and takes less than 1 minute! If you already have a username, then simply login login under your username now to join the discussion.

Please observe our posting guidelines:

  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, duplicate, or gibberish posts.
  3. No vitriolic or systematic personal attacks against other members.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No cyberstalking or malicious posting of negative or private information (doxing/doxxing) of members.
  6. No trolling.
  7. The use of "sock puppet" accounts to circumvent disciplinary action taken by moderators, create a false impression of consensus or support, or stage conversations, is prohibited.

Please try to maintain a semblance of civility at all times.

Blow the Whistle

See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform a moderator.


NOTE: Please keep all discussion on-topic. This forum is for this specific tournament only. To discuss chess or this site in general, visit the Kibitzer's Café.

Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors.
All moderator actions taken are ultimately at the sole discretion of the administration.

Spot an error? Please suggest your correction and help us eliminate database mistakes!

Copyright 2001-2021, Chessgames Services LLC