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Annotations v.07: Corus Edition
Compiled by chessmoron
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A collection/Analysis of 2007 games (CORUS CHESS TOURNAMENT) that I think deserves recognition and be "Game of the Day."

#1: <1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 g6 3 Nc3 Bg7 4 e4 d6 5 Be2 0-0 6 Nf3 e5 7 0-0 Nc6 8 d5 Ne7 9 b4 Nh5 10 Re1 f5 11 Ng5 Nf6 12 f3> Usual, though Kramnik prefers 12 Bf3. <12...Kh8 13 Ne6 Bxe6 14 dxe6> The pawn at e6 may fall, but White opens the d-file and gains d5 for a Knight. <14...Nh5 15 g3 Bf6 16 c5 f4 17 Kg2 Nc6 18 cxd6 cxd6 19 Nd5 Nd4 20 Bb2> After 20 gxf4 Nxe6, White's King is too vulnerable. <20...Nxe6 21 g4 Nhg7 22 Nxf6 Rxf6 23 Qd5 Qe7 24 Red1 Rd8 25 Qa5> What else? The Bishops do little, and Black intends to open a file by ...h7-h5. <25...b6> Weakening c6. However, Radjabov feared 25...a6 26 Qb6, followed by 27 Rd5 and 28 Rad1. <26 Qd5 Rff8 27 Rac1 h5> Threatening 28...hxg4 29 fxg4 f3+! 30 Bxf3 Nf4+. <28 gxh5> Neither 28 h3? Qh4 29 Rh1 Qg3+ 30 Kf1 Ng5 nor 28 g5 Nxg5 29 Rc6 Nf7 helps White. <28...Qh4!> Black must attack before his doomed Queenside collapses. Too slow is 28...Nxh5 29 Rc6 Nf6 because 30 Bxe5! dxe5 31 Qxe6 breaks through. <29 Rc6> Or 29 hxg6 Rf6 30 Rg1 Nh5! 31 Kf1 Qxh2, and Black's attack should succeed. <29...g5!> Shirov, a terrific attacker, reportedly overlooked this idea. <30 Rxd6 g4 31 Rxe6!?> Trappy. Black refutes 31 Bxe5 by 31...Qh3+ 32 Kg1 g3, not fearing 33 Bxg7+ Kxg7 34 Qe5+ Kh7. If 31 Qxe5 Qh3+ 32 Kg1, not 32...g3? because 33 Qxg7+! Nxg7 34 Rh6+ Kg8 35 Bc4+ Ne6 36 Rh8+ Kf7 37 Rh7+ Kg8 38 Rh8+ salvages a draw. But 32...Rxd6 33 Rxd6 g3 is convincing. <31...Rxd5 32 Rh6+ Kg8 33 Bc4 gxf3+ 34 Kh1> White cannot stand 34 Kxf3 Qh3+ 35 Kf2 Qe3+ 36 Kg2 Qxe4+ or 34 Kf1 Qh3+ 35 Ke1 f2+! 36 Kxf2 Qe3+. <34...Nxh5!?> fantastic conception, but the computer points out that the less spectacular 34...Qh3 35 Bxd5+ Rf7 36 Rg6 f2 37 Rg2 Qd3! wins more cleanly. <35 Rg1+ Ng3+ 36 Rxg3+ fxg3 37 Rxh4> The greedier 37 Bxd5+ Kg7 38 Rxh4 permits 38...g2+ 39 Kg1 f2+ 40 Kxg2 f1Q+ 41 Kg3 Qf3 mate. <37...g2+ 38 Kg1 f2+ 39 Kxg2 f1Q+ 40 Bxf1> White has captured two Queens in four moves, but he's still suffering. <40...Rd2+ 41 Kg3 Rxb2 42 Bc4+ Kg7 43 Bb3 Rb1> Black makes progress by harassing White's King. <44 Kg2 Rc8! 45 Kf3?!> Tougher is 45 Rh5 Rc3 (threatening mate by 46...Rb2+) 46 Rg5+ Kh6 47 Rg3. <45...Rc3+ 46 Kg4 Rf1!> Anticipating mate after 47 Bd5 Kg6 or 47 Rh5 Rf4+ 48 Kg5 Rc6. <47 Kh5 Kf6!, 0-1>

#2: <1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 d6 3 d4 cxd4 4 Nxd4 Nf6 5 Nc3 Nc6 6 Bg5 e6 7 Qd3> Varying from the usual 7 Qd2. <7...Be7 8 0-0-0 0-0 9 f4 Qb6> Reasonable, although 9 ... h6 is most critical. <10 Ndb5 Rd8 11 Qg3> Inviting 11 ... a6 12 Nxd6!, when 12 ... Nh5 13 Nc4! and 12 ... Rxd6 13 Rxd6 Nh5 14 Rxc6! keep the extra pawn. <11...Ne8 12 Bxe7 Nxe7 13 Bc4 Qc5 14 Bb3 Bd7 15 Nd4 b5> Counterplay! <16 f5 exf5> Not bad is 16 ... e5 17 Nf3 Nf6. <17 Rhe1! Nf6> Sharpest. Not 17 ... fxe4? 18 Nxe4 Qb6 19 Ng5. <18 e5!?> White wants more than recovering the pawn by 18 exf5 Nxf5 19 Nxf5 Bxf5 20 Nd5 Nxd5 21 Rxd5 Qc8 22 Rxb5. <18...f4! 19 Qg5 Ng6> Or 19 ... h6 20 Qxf4 Ng6 21 Qe3 dxe5 22 Ndxb5, with even chances. <20 Bxf7+?!> Imaginative but flawed. Correct is 20 Nf3. <20...Kxf7 21 Nb3 Qc6??> After 21 ... Qxe5! 22 Rxe5 dxe5, White must give up material to rescue his Queen. <22 exf6> Crushing. Now 22 ... h6? gets mated by 23 Re7+. <22...gxf6 23 Qh6 Rh8> No better is 23 ... Kg8 24 Nd5 Rf8 25 Re7!. <24 Nd4 Qa6?> Fatal. Black lingers into the endgame by 24 ... Qxg2 25 Ndxb5 Qg5, although White still wins with 26 Nxd6+. <25 Nd5> Seeing 25 ... Qxa2 26 Re7+! Nxe7 27 Qxf6+. <Rae8 26 Rxe8 Bxe8 27 Re1 Qb7 28 Nf5, 1-0>

#3: <1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 g6 3 Nc3 d5 4 cxd5 Nxd5 5 e4 Nxc3 6 bxc3 Bg7 7 Bc4 c5 8 Ne2 Nc6 9 Be3 0-0 10 0-0 Bg4> Smyslov advocated 10 ... Qc7. <11 f3 Na5 12 Bd3> The pawn-grabbing 12 Bxf7+ Rxf7 13 fxg4 Nc4 is fine for Black. <12...cxd4 13 cxd4 Be6 14 d5!?> Bronstein's 1950 innovation, still considered critical. <14...Bxa1 15 Qxa1 f6> Without his Bishop, Black must beware of an invasion on the dark squares. However, analysis has never proved an advantage for either side. <16 Qd4> Recently revived. For years, 16 Rb1 and 16 Qb1 were most popular. <16...Bf7> Another branch begins 16 ... Bd7 17 e5 fxe5 18 Qxe5 Qb8 19 Qxe7 Re8 20 Qc5 b6 21 Qc1. <17 Bh6 Re8 18 Bb5 e5 19 Qf2 Re7 20 f4> Welcoming 20 ... Qb6, as 21 Qxb6 axb6 22 fxe5 Rxe5 23 Ng3 f5 24 Bf4 recovers the exchange. And 22 ... fxe5 23 Nc1 gives Black problems with his e-pawn and his stranded Knight. <20...exf4 21 Qxf4 Qb6+ 22 Kh1 Bxd5> Not 22 ... Qxb5?? 23 Qxf6 Bxd5 because 24 Qf8+ mates. <23 exd5 Qxb5 24 Qxf6 Qe8> The game remains precariously balanced. <25 Qd4> Black would not mind 25 Bd2 Nc4 26 Bc3 Ne5 27 Ng3 Rc8. <25...Rd8> Or 25 ... Rf7 26 Rxf7 Qxf7 27 h3 Rd8 28 Qc3!, as in the game. <26 h3 Rf7 27 Rxf7 Qxf7 28 Qc3!> Undoubtedly found in pre-game analysis. The obvious 28 Nf4? favors Black after 28 ... Nc6! 29 Qa1 Ne7 30 Ne6 Rxd5 31 Ng5 Rxg5 32 Bxg5 h5. <28...b6 29 Ng3> Heading for f6. <29...Nb7?!> Better is 29 ... Re8 30 Qd4 Qc7, foreseeing 31 Ne4? Qe5 or 31 d6 Re1+ 32 Kh2 Qd7 33 Qf4 Re8, when 34 Ne4 Qf5 still appears equal. <30 Ne4 Qe7> Black must shed material. If 30 ... Nc5 31 Nf6+ Kh8, White makes progress by 32 d6 Ne6 33 Qe5 Rc8 (or 33 ... Ng7 34 Qe7) 34 Nd5+ Ng7 35 Nc7. <31 Nf6+ Kf7> As 31 ... Kh8? 32 d6! sets up a deadly discovery. <32 Nxh7 Kg8 33 Nf6+ Kf7 34 Ng4 Kg8 35 Qd2 Re8> White's initiative continues even after the slightly tougher 35 ... Rc8 36 Qf4. <36 Qf4 Qd6 37 Qf2> Typical Topalov! Most grandmasters would enter the endgame by 37 Nf6+ Kf7 38 Nxe8+ Qxf4 39 Bxf4 Kxe8 40 g4, but he wants a middlegame knockout. <37...Qc5 38 Qg3> Also powerful is 38 Nf6+ Kf7 39 Qf1. <38...Qd4?!> Losing. However, 38 ... Qe7 39 Qf4 Qd6 gives White a second chance for the pawn-ahead endgame. <39 Kh2> Threatening 40 Qc7. <39...Nd8> If 39 ... Rc8 40 Qe1!, White invades at e6 or e7. And 39 ... Nc5 40 Qd6 Kf7 41 Bg5! creates unstoppable threats of 42 Bf6 and 42 Nh6+. <40 Qd6 Ne6 41 Be3!, 1-0>

#4: <1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bb5 a6 4 Ba4 Nf6 5 0-0 b5 6 Bb3 Bb7 7 Re1 Bc5 8 c3 0-0> Usual is 8...d6 9 d4 Bb6, but Black has an interesting new idea. <9 d4 Bb6 10 Be3> The obvious tries 10 dxe5 Ng4 and 10 Nxe5 Nxe5 11 dxe5 Nxe4 only produce equality, while 10 d5 Na5 11 Nxe5? Re8 favors Black. <10...exd4 11 cxd4 Na5> Hitting e4. Of course, 11...Nxe4?? loses a piece to 12 d5. <12 Bg5> Aggressive play from the world's youngest grandmaster. Black has less to fear from 12 d5 Bxe3 13 Rxe3 Re8. <12...Nxb3 13 Qxb3 h6 14 Bh4 g5?> Correct is 14...Re8. Black parries 15 e5? by 15...Bxf3 16 Qxf3 Bxd4, while 15 Nc3 g5 16 Bg3 Nxe4 17 Ne5 Nd6 gives White barely enough for the pawn. <15 Nxg5! Nxe4> Did Black count on this reply, or did he overlook that 15...hxg5 16 Bxg5 Bxd4 loses to 17 Qg3 Kh7 18 e5? <16 Rxe4! Bxe4 17 Qg3> Threatening discoveries against Black's King and Queen. <17...hxg5> Hopeless is 17...Bg6 18 Nxf7 Kxf7 19 Bxd8 Raxd8 20 Nc3. <18 Bxg5 Qe8 19 Bf6+ Bg6 20 Nc3> Preparing 21 Qh4. <20...Qe6?!> Black gets almost enough for the Queen by 20...Bxd4! 21 Nd5! Qe4 22 Ne7+ Qxe7 23 Bxe7 Rfe8, but 24 Qg5 Bxb2 26 Rd1 d6 27 f4 continues White's attack. <21 Qh4 Bh7 22 Qg5+ Bg6 23 Nd5 Bxd4> After 23...Rfe8 24 h3, Black has no remedy for 25 Qh6. <24 Bxd4 c5> Or 24...f5 25 Qh6 Kf7 26 Qg7+ Ke8 27 Nxc7+. <25 Nf6+ Kg7 26 Ne8+ Kg8 27 Qh6, 1-0.>

#5: <1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 g6 3 Nc3 d5 4 cxd5 Nxd5 5 e4 Nxc3 6 bxc3 Bg7 7 Bc4 c5 8 Ne2 Nc6 9 Be3 0-0 10 0-0 Bd7> A rare choice, probably designed to avoid 10 ... Qc7 11 Rc1 Rd8 12 Bf4. <11 Rb1 Qc7 12 Bf4 Qc8> Slightly awkward, but White's edge is minimal. Nor does 12 ... e5 13 Bg3 completely equalize. <13 Rc1 a6 14 Qd2 b5 15 Bd3 Qb7 16 Bh6 Bxh6> Safer is 16 ... Qb6, not fearing 17 Bxg7 Kxg7 18 Qe3 cxd4 19 cxd4 e5. <17 Qxh6 cxd4?!> Opening the c-file will have drastic consequences. First 17 ... Qb6 limits White's activity. <8 cxd4 Qb6 19 Rc5!> Foreseeing 19 ... Nxd4? 20 Rh5! gxh5 21 Qxb6. <19...Bg4?> Losing. Black's last chance is 19 ... Rfd8 20 Rfc1 Rac8. <20 Nf4!> One threat is 21 Nd5 Qb7 22 Rxc6 Qxc6 23 Nxe7+. <20...Nxd4> White refutes 20 ... Rfc8 by 21 Rg5 Bd7 22 Nh5 Qxd4 23 e5. <21 Rg5 Bf3> No better are 21 ... Be6 22 Nh5 and 21 ... Bd7 22 Rh5, while 21 ... e5 loses a piece to 22 Nd5 Qe6 23 Rxg4. <22 Rg3, 1-0.>

#1
Shirov vs Radjabov, 2007 
(E97) King's Indian, 47 moves, 0-1

#2
W Spoelman vs N Kosintseva, 2007 
(B62) Sicilian, Richter-Rauzer, 28 moves, 1-0

#3
Topalov vs Shirov, 2007 
(D86) Grunfeld, Exchange, 41 moves, 1-0

#4
Negi vs W Spoelman, 2007 
(C78) Ruy Lopez, 27 moves, 1-0

#5
Van Wely vs Svidler, 2007 
(D86) Grunfeld, Exchange, 22 moves, 1-0

5 games

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