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WCC : Steinitz-Zukertort 1886
Compiled by WCC Editing Project
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ORIGINAL: Steinitz - Zukertort World Championship Match (1886)

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LATEST REVISED DRAFT by Karpova

Wilhelm Steinitz was born in Prague, Bohemia (today Czech Republic) in 1836.<1> He dominated the chess world for most of the second half of the 1800s,<2> and beat his strongest active contemporaries in matches: Anderssen - Steinitz (1866), Steinitz - Zukertort (1872) and Steinitz - Blackburne (1876). Steinitz considered his world championship tenure to have started with his win over Adolf Anderssen,<3> although in these matches the title of world champion was probably not officially at stake.<4> In 1882, Steinitz challenged Johannes Zukertort to another match but the negotiations failed.<5> Zukertort was born in Lublin, Poland in 1842,<6> and by the 1870s he had become one of the world's strongest chessplayers.<7> Zukertort scored an overwhelming victory at London (1883) ahead of Steinitz. Contemporaneous periodicals openly questioned Steinitz's superiority.<8> At the end of June 1883, Steinitz again challenged Zukertort to a match, and proposed conditions.<9> Zukertort agreed in principle to the match, but his poor health after his tournament victory did not permit the stress of such a match in the near future.<10>

Steinitz emigrated to the USA in late 1883.<11> The negotiations for a match with Zukertort now dragged on. The main disagreement was location: Steinitz wanted to play in the USA, but not in London, where he had encountered unfairness and hostility.<12> Zukertort, on the other hand, insisted on a match in London, where his financial backers resided.<13> Finally, in mid-1885 Zukertort agreed to a match in the USA and Steinitz agreed to play a return match in London.<14> At first, the preliminary seconds were to be Gustave Simonson for Steinitz and James Innes Minchin for Zukertort, but by the time the match started, Steinitz had chosen Thomas Frere and Zukertort Charles Moehle as their respective seconds. Frère and Minchin went on to conduct the match negotiations.<15> A forfeit deposit of $250 was imposed.<16> Steinitz forwarded the sum at the beginning of December 1885.<17> Zukertort arrived in New York on December 13 but the transmission of his deposit was delayed, so the match began later than originally planned.<18>

The conditions for the first official world chess championship match were signed on December 29, 1885. The stakes were $2,000 a side,<19> with a guarantee of at least $750 to the winner and $500 to the loser.<20> The winner would be the first to win 10 games. In case of 9:9 (draws not counting), the match was to be declared drawn. The time control was 30 moves in 2 hours and then 15 moves in 1 hour. The match was to begin in New York and remain in that venue until one player had scored 4 wins. Then it would move to St. Louis until one player had won 3 games there. The rest of the match was to take place in New Orleans. An umpire for each player was chosen from the chess club hosting the match during each of the three legs. The two umpires supervised the games and settled all disputes. In the case of a disagreement between the umpires, or of a player feeling that an umpire's decision contradicted the rules, the referee had the final say.<19> A change was made in St. Louis that the match would be considered drawn if the score reached 8:8, draws not counting.<21>

The match began on January 11, 1886 <18> in Cartier's Hall, Fifth Avenue, in New York.<22> The New York leg ended January 20, when Zukertort scored 4 consecutive victories after losing the first game. Play was resumed on February 3 in St. Louis.<23> The games were played during the day in the Harmonie Hall and at night in the Chess, Checkers and Whist Club.<24> The umpires were Ben R. Foster for Steinitz and William Duncan for Zukertort.<25> The St. Louis leg ended on February 10 after Steinitz scored 3 wins and a draw.<23> After a rest of almost 2 weeks, the New Orleans leg began on February 26.<26> Charles Francis Buck was the referee. The umpires were Fernand Clairborne for Steinitz and Charles Maurian for Zukertort.<27> Play took place in the New Orleans Chess, Checkers and Whist Club at the corner of Baronne and Canal Street.<28> Carnival activities led to a suspension of the match for a few days.<29> After a draw, Steinitz pulled ahead with 2 wins. Zukertort struck back with a win, but managed only 3 draws and another loss in the next games. Steinitz then went on to win the last 3 games, becoming the first official world champion on March 29, 1886 with a final score of (+10 -5 =5).<23>

1. Jeremy Gaige, "Chess Personalia: A Biobibliography", (McFarland 1987, softcover reprint 2005), p. 406

2. Rod Edwards, <Wilhelm Steinitz> http://www.edochess.ca/players/p34....

3. Obituary in the "New York Times", 14 October 1900, quoting Steinitz from "My advertisement to anti-Semites in Vienna and Elsewhere." In Edward Winter, <Early Uses of ‘World Chess Champion’> http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/...

4. Edward Winter, <Early Uses of ‘World Chess Champion’> http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/...

5. Kurt Landsberger, "William Steinitz - Chess Champion 2d ed." (McFarland 1995), p. 168

6. Gaige, pp. 481-482

7. Rod Edwards, <Johannes Zukertort> http://www.edochess.ca/players/p39....

8. The "Chess Player's Chronicle" mentions that Zukertort had become champion "in the opinion of some" (18 July 1883, p. 50. In Edward Winter, <Early Uses of ‘World Chess Champion’> http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/...). According to the "Cincinnati Commercial", the "indications are that Mr. Z. is the strongest living player" (7 July 1883. Reprinted in Jacques N. Pope, <Chess Archaeology> http://www.chessarch.com/excavation...). The "Baltimore Sunday News" was quoted as saying that Zukertort was "now the acknowledged world champion chessplayer" ("Newark Sunday Call", 8 July 1883. Reprinted in Jacques N. Pope, <Chess Archaeology> http://www.chessarch.com/excavation...) and the " New York Turf, Field and Farm" announced Steinitz's soon to be published match challenge to be a challenge to Zukertort's "title to the championship" (6 July 1883. Reprinted in Jacques N. Pope, <Chess Archaeology> http://www.chessarch.com/excavation...). Johannes Minckwitz writes, that their rivalry grew more and more acute after the tournament, and a match between them moved closer and closer (Source 15, pp. 4-5. Reprinted in <Internet Archive> https://archive.org/stream/bub_gb_D...). Charles Devide described the tournament as "a bitter disappointment" and that then all of Steinitz' "energies were bent on securing a match" (Devidé, "A Memorial to William Steinitz", New York and London, 1901, p. 7. Reprinted in <Internet Archive> https://archive.org/stream/cu319240...).

9. "New York Turf, Field and Farm", 13 July 1883. Reprinted in Jacques N. Pope, <Chess Archaeology> http://www.chessarch.com/excavation...

10. "British Chess Magazine", August-September 1883, pp. 282-283

11. Landsberger, p. 138

12. Landsberger, p. 146

13. Landsberger, p. 145

14. Landsberger, p. 148

15. Johannes von Minckwitz, "Der Entscheidungskampf zwischen W. Steinitz und J. H. Zukertort um die Meisterschaft der Welt", Leipzig, 1886, pp. 7-8. Reprinted in <Internet Archive> https://archive.org/stream/bub_gb_D...

16. Landsberger, p. 150

17. "Nashville Union", 6 December 1885 (originally from the New Orleans "Times Democrat"). Reprinted in Jacques N. Pope, <Chess Archaeology> http://www.chessarch.com/excavation..., Item 3

18. "British Chess Magazine", February 1886, p. 69

19. "Chess Monthly", January 1886, pp. 136-137. In Edward Winter's <World Chess Championship Rules> http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/...

20. Landsberger, p. 150

21. "British Chess Magazine", May 1886, p. 184

22. "British Chess Magazine", February 1886, p. 54

23. Rod Edwards, <Steinitz-Zukertort (1886)> http://www.edochess.ca/matches/m836...

24. "British Chess Magazine", March 1886, p. 116

25. "St. Louis Globe-Democrat", 3 February 1886. Reprinted in Jacques N. Pope, <Chess Archaeology> http://www.chessarch.com/excavation...

26. "Charleston Sunday News", 21 February 1886. Reprinted in Jacques N. Pope, <Chess Archaeology> http://www.chessarch.com/excavation..., Item 1

27. "British Chess Magazine", April 1886, pp. 139-140 (originally from the New Orleans "Times-Democrat", 28 February 1886)

28. Landsberger, p. 163

29. "Brooklyn Chess Chronicle", 15 March 1886, volume 4, number 6, p. 81. Reprinted in <HathiTrust Digital Library> http://hdl.handle.net/2027/hvd.hn43...

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Wilhelm Steinitz (1836-1900) dominated the chess world for most of the second half of the 1800s.1 He beat his strongest active contemporaries in matches: Anderssen - Steinitz (1866), Steinitz - Zukertort (1872) and Steinitz - Blackburne (1876). Steinitz considered his world championship tenure to have started with his win over Adolf Anderssen, 2 although in these matches the title of world champion was not officially at stake.2 In 1882, Steinitz challenged Johannes Zukertort to another match but the negotiations failed.3 Zukertort had become one of the world's strongest chessplayers in the 1870s.4 After Zukertort's overwhelming victory at London (1883) ahead of Steinitz, the question of who was the strongest chess player in the world became urgent. Therefore, Steinitz challenged Zukertort to a match after the tournament. Zukertort agreed in principle to the match, but his poor health after his tournament victory did not permit the stress of such a match in the near future.5

Steinitz emigrated to the USA in late 1883.6 The negotiations now dragged on. The main disagreement was the location of a match. Steinitz wanted to play in the USA preferably, but not in London where he had encountered unfairness and hostility.7 Zukertort on the other hand insisted on a match in London, where his financial backers were.8 Finally, in mid-1885 Zukertort agreed to a match in the USA and Steinitz to play a return match in London.9 The seconds were Thomas Frere for Steinitz 10 and James Innes Minchin for Zukertort.9 A forfeit deposit of $250 was imposed.11 Steinitz forwarded the sum at the beginning of December 1886.12 Zukertort arrived in New York on December 13 but the transmission of his stakes was delayed, so the match began later than originally planned.13

The conditions for the first official world chess championship match were signed on December 29, 1885. The stakes were $2,000 a side. The winner would be the first to win 10 games. In case of 9:9 (draws not counting), the match was to be declared drawn. The time control was 30 moves in 2 h and then 15 moves in 1 h. The match was to begin in New York and last until one player had scored 4 wins. Then it would move to St. Louis until one player had won 3 games there. The rest of the match was to take place in New Orleans. An umpire for each player was chosen from the chess club hosting the match during each division.14 A change was made in St. Louis that the match would be considered drawn if the score reached 8:8, draws not counting.15 Expenses were $500 for the winner and $750 for the loser.16

The match began on January 11, 1886 13 in Cartier's Hall, Fifth Avenue, in New York.17 The umpires were Thomas Frere for Steinitz and Adolph Mohle for Zukertort.18 The New York leg ended January 20 when Zukertort scored 4 consecutive victories after losing the first game. Play was resumed on February 3 in St. Louis.19 The games were played during the day in the Harmonie Hall and at night in the Chess, Checkers and Whist Club.20 The umpires were Ben R. Foster for Steinitz and William Duncan for Zukertort.21 The St. Louis leg ended on February 10 after Steinitz scored 3 wins and a draw.19 After a rest of almost 2 weeks, 22 the New Orleans leg began on February 26. Charles Francis Buck was the referee.23 The umpires were Fernand Clairborne for Steinitz and Charles Maurian for Zukertort.23 Play took place in the New Orleans Chess, Checkers and Whist Club at the corner of Baronne and Canal Street.24 After a draw, Steinitz pulled ahead with 2 wins. Zukertort struck back with a win, but managed only 3 draws and another loss in the next games. Steinitz then went on to win the last 3 games, becoming the first official world champion on March 29, 1886 with a final score of (+10 -5 =5).

1 Rod Edwards, http://www.edochess.ca/players/p34....

2 Obituary in the "New York Times", October 14, 1900, quoting Steinitz from "My advertisement to anti-Semites in Vienna and Elsewhere." http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/...

3 Kurt Landsberger, "William Steinitz - Chess Champion 2d ed." (McFarland 1995), p. 168

4 Rod Edwards, http://www.edochess.ca/players/p39....

5 "British Chess Magazine", August-September 1883, pp. 282-283

6 Landsberger, p. 138

7 Landsberger, p. 146

8 Landsberger, p. 145

9 Landsberger, p. 148

10 Landsberger, p. 147

11 Landsberger, p. 150

12 "Nashville Union", December 6, 1885 (originally from the New Orleans "Times Democrat"). In Jacques N. Pope, http://www.chessarch.com/excavation...

13 "British Chess Magazine", February 1886, p. 69

14 "Chess Monthly", January 1886, pp. 136-137. In Edward Winter's "World Chess Championship Rules", http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/...

15 "British Chess Magazine", May 1886, p. 185

16 Landsberger, p. 150

17 "British Chess Magazine", February 1886, p. 54

18 "Brooklyn Daily Eagle", December 22, 1885. In Jacques N. Pope, http://www.chessarch.com/excavation...

19 Rod Edwards, http://www.edochess.ca/matches/m836...

20 "British Chess Magazine", March 1886, p. 116

21 "St. Louis Globe-Democrat", February 3, 1886. In Jacques N. Pope http://www.chessarch.com/excavation...

22 "Charleston Sunday News", February 21, 1886. In Jacques N. Pope http://www.chessarch.com/excavation...

23 "British Chess Magazine", April 1886, p. 140 (originally from the New Orleans "Times-Democrat", February 28, 1886)

24 Landsberger, p. 163

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Karpova

But before this reaches our readers a challenge will have been received by Mr. Zukertort from Mr. Steinitz for a match at chess for a stake of three hundred pounds sterling a side. Mr. Steinitz, for reasons which he will himself express in his correspondence in this journal, declines to accept the result of the late tournament, in which he receives the second prize, as a true test of the relative chess powers of himself and Mr. Zukertort. This is but natural, and Zukertort could not expect that his title to the championship should remain unchallenged for an instant after the close of the contest. New York Turf, Field and Farm, 1883.07.06,
http://www.chessarch.com/excavation...

The indications are that Mr. Z. is the strongest living player. ... <It is reported that Steinitz has challenged Zukertort to play a match of seven games for $2,000.>

Cincinnati Commercial, 1883.07.07, http://www.chessarch.com/excavation...

Now that the London affairs is well over attention is drawn to the probable match between Zukertort and Steinitz. Rumor has it that the Hungarian has actually challenged "the Doctor" to a contest of seven games for a stake of $2,000. As well as we can learn, however, there is nothing definite. (the "Hungarian" is probably Steinitz and the "Doctor" Zukertort) ... <The victor must certainly be placed high up in the rank of first-class players, while the question naturally suggests itself to one's mind, "Is Steinitz falling off as a player?" - 'Leeds Mercury'.> (note that the victor is Chigorin, who beat Steinitz in both encounters).

Charleston Sunday News, 1883.07.08, http://www.chessarch.com/excavation...

Zukertort "is now the acknowledged world champion chessplayer, and should Steinitz challenge him to play a match he would probably not refuse without giving a better excuse than that Steinitz gave Mason for the reason it is impossible to conceive of a poorer one." - Baltimore Sunday News.

Newark Sunday Call, 1883.07.08, http://www.chessarch.com/excavation...

<MR. STEINITZ'S CHALLENGE.

Under date of June 27, Mr. Steinitz writes to us as follows: "Mr. R. Steel, of Calcutta, has sent the following letter to Mr. J. I. Minchin, the Honorable Secretary of the St. George's Chess Club, who, on former occasions, has acted as Mr. Zukertort's second:

Oriental Club, June 24, 1883.
"Dear Sir: Referring to our recent conversation on the subject of a match between Messrs. Steinitz and Zukertort, I now have the pleasure to inform you that Mr. Steinitz has authorized me to propose such a match. I trust you will use your influence to promote a contest which will be of extreme interest to the public, and will form a fitting sequel to the late successful tournament.>
... Then follow Steinitz suggested conditions, i. e. victor is the winner of either the first eight or ten games, 15 moves per hour, etc..

New York Turf, Field and Farm, 1883.07.13, http://www.chessarch.com/excavation...

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Resource from <Karpova> "Games Played in the London International Chess Tournament 1883":

http://hdl.handle.net/2027/njp.3210...

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EDIT <Karpova>

<On Game Collection: Game Collection: WCC : Steinitz-Zukertort 1886 A possibility is to cite the obituary of Steinitz in the Wiener Schachzeitung instead of Edwards, to have less work (source 1).

Wiener Schachzeitung, August-September 1900, pp. 157-161.

This is the source for the whole obituary, but if you want it more specific, on pp. 159-160 are his match and tournament successes.

Here you can click through the article to see what it looks like: http://anno.onb.ac.at/cgi-content/a...

I think it also gets the point across that <Wilhelm Steinitz (1836-1900) dominated the chess world for most of the second half of the 1800s.> (btw, maybe delete the <(1836-1900)> as this was not well-liked?)>

===

Karpova

<<"During the mid-1880s, he established himself as one of the strongest chessplayers in the world.<1>"> It may indeed look like that. But what is actually cited is Gunsberg's match and tournament record according to Rod Edwards. And in order to compile this information, he used all those sources. If this is not clear enough, the section with Edwards' sources could be introduced with a short sentence to the effect <These are the sources cited by Rod Edwards> or something similar.>

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EDIT information <Karpova>:

While it would certainly be interesting to find out when they decided to turn it into an official worldchampionship match, this may not be so easy.

See http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/... the item from 1883.

It is clear that Steinitz considered himself to be the champion of the world and there were certainly many people who agreed with him (yet Morphy was still alive). With Zukertort's great triumph, it was not so clear anymore. Some considered Zukertort to be the strongest now. The problem is the transition from the <recognized> champion of the world to the <official> one.

I would say that for this statement <This match was proposed to be for the official chess championship (source).> we would need a source specifying the introduction of the official worldchampionship. A statement about settling who was the strongest would not be enough, in my opinion.

I quote Winter's C.N. 3325 <In January 1885 Steinitz had begun publication of his International Chess Magazine, which contained much documentary material about the protracted match negotiations. At first the references were merely to the ‘championship’ or ‘the champion title’, without ‘world’.>

The earliest point of time may be December 1885 (see again C.N. 3325 <The two players will soon enter on their heavy trial for the coveted championship of the world …>), i. e. shortly before the conditions were agreed upon (December 29: http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/... ).

It would be nice if the matter could be settled but I do not think that it is an absolute requirement, especially considering how much time it consumes and how few additional info is gained.

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Edward Winter, "Steinitz Quotes"

http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/...

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Edward Winter C.N. 3324:

<It is indeed true that Steinitz and Zukertort’s contract (29 December 1885) stipulated:

‘The Score at Nine Games. Should the score stand at nine (9) games won to each of the players, then the match shall be declared drawn.’

Source: The Chess Monthly, January 1886, pages 136-137.

However, on page 118 of the May 1886 International Chess Magazine Steinitz reported that this provision had been amended before the final series of games began in New Orleans on 26 February 1886:

‘Two of the conditions of the match one of them omitted here, being a minor matter concerning playing hours were altered by mutual consent of the players, who had agreed, in the first place, to reduce the score, which rendered the match a draw, to eight all, instead of nine all, as previously stipulated. There can be no doubt that both the principals acted bona fide and chiefly in the interest of their backers in agreeing to such a modification of the original terms of the match, for their main reason in adopting the alteration was to exclude all element of chance as much as possible and to avoid risking the issues at stake on the result of two games. But, on consideration and in order not to establish a questionable precedent, we feel bound to say that the opinions of some critics, who, without in the least impugning the motives of the two principals, have expressed doubts on the legality of such proceeding, now appear to us reasonable. For it is justly contended that the two players had no right to alter any of the main conditions of the match without consulting their backers, who had deposited their stakes after the chief terms had apparently been finally settled…’>

From C.N. 3325

The first sentence of the contract between the two players (The Chess Monthly, January 1886, pages 136-137) specified that the match was ‘for the Championship of the World’.

#####################

Edward Winter, Chessnote 3750. "Steinitz’s world championship tenure"

http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/...

C.N. 3325 gave a series of quotes illustrating various contemporary writers’ views on when Steinitz became world champion. The clearest statement we have seen from Steinitz himself was quoted in his 14 August 1900 obituary in the New York Times, from a pamphlet entitled My advertisement to anti-Semites in Vienna and Elsewhere:

‘And since 1895 I have been obliged at an advanced age and while I was half crippled to export myself in order to import only a portion of my living for myself and family, and this portion did not amount to $250 per annum within the last two years when I deduct traveling expenses and increased cost for staying abroad, although I was chess champion of the world for 28 years!!!’

We also now add a paragraph from page 50 of the Chess Player’s Chronicle, 18 July 1883, i.e. shortly after Zukertort won the London, 1883 tournament, three points ahead of Steinitz:

‘The chess championship of the world is a subject which will form a topic of discussion in the chess press for some time to come. The last issue of the Bradford Observer contains some remarks on it. The writer argues that Zukertort may hold the title and yet be “quite right in refusing to enter into so hard an engagement” (the match recently proposed is referred to) “after the trial he had to go through in the International”. We disagree. It is very certain that Steinitz was, at one time, fairly entitled to the position of champion, and under such circumstances would hold it so long as he could defend himself against all comers. He has just taken an inferior place to Zukertort, in a tournament, and for the time being Zukertort, in the opinion of some, becomes champion, but if he desires to hold that title he must defend himself against all comers; so soon as he declines to play a match, unless under very exceptional circumstances, he loses his position, and this is more particularly the case when his would-be opponent happens to be the man who for years past has been recognized as the champion. A tournamental advantage is not considered of much moment as regards the chess championship, and unless it can be maintained by after play we should be inclined to dismiss it as one of the freaks of fortune. Steinitz has challenged the only man who has beaten him since he has been chess champion; if he will not play, then Steinitz will be right in resuming his old title.’

A noteworthy point is that the item made no mention of Morphy, who was still alive.

########################################

Edward Winter, Chessnote 4163. "Steinitz v Zukertort"

http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/...

Russell Miller (Chelan, WA, USA) quotes from page 169 of the Brooklyn Chess Chronicle, 15 July 1883:

‘The Glasgow Herald furnishes the following intelligence: “Some important results are likely to spring from the positions occupied in the International Tourney by the ultimate prize winners. We understand that Steinitz is about to challenge Zukertort to play a match for the sum of £300 to £500 and the championship of the world, and it is the opinion of some who are in a position to judge of the matter that the match will come off.”’

Noting that Zukertort was reported by the Brooklyn Chess Chronicle to have turned down the match because he intended ‘to make a year’s tour’, our correspondent asks if Steinitz called himself world champion at that time.

Steinitz’s proposal of a match was reported on page 323 of the July 1883 Chess Monthly (edited by Hoffer and Zukertort):

‘Mr Steinitz has authorized Mr Steel to communicate with Mr Minchin with reference to a match which he seems willing to play with Mr Zukertort. The conditions are £200 a side or more if agreeable; the match to consist of eight or ten games; three or four games to be played a week; £50 to be deposited as forfeit money; and play to commence between October and January. Mr Zukertort has authorized Mr Minchin to reply to Mr Steel that he cannot make arrangements for a match at such a remote future.’

This does not seem an altogether fair reflection of Robert Steel’s letter to Minchin (dated 24 June 1883, the day after the London, 1883 tournament ended), which was published on page 42 of the Chess Player’s Chronicle, 11 July 1883:

‘... The following are the conditions for the match suggested by Mr Steinitz. If they be approved by Mr Zukertort, any minor conditions may be easily arranged.

1. That the winner of the first eight or ten games be the victor. 2. That the games be played under a time-limit of 15 moves per hour. 3. That play shall be carried on either three days or four days per week, as Mr Zukertort prefers. 4. That Mr Steinitz will accept any suggestion of Mr Zukertort’s as to the hour of the day when play shall commence. 5. That the time for commencement of the match shall be fixed for any date between 1 October and 1 January, which may best suit Mr Zukertort. 6. That the stakes be for any sum not less than £200 a side which Mr Zukertort prefers. 7. That the games shall be the property of both players. Mr Steinitz is of opinion that the contest should, in the interest of both players, take place in a private room, and that admission should be allowed to friends of both parties.

Mr Steinitz is prepared to make an immediate deposit of £50, to bind a match on the basis herein suggested.’

Minchin’s reply to Steel, dated 27 June 1883, was given on the following page of the Chronicle:

‘... Zukertort begs me to point out to you that owing to his health and avocations he has always, as Mr Steinitz is aware, refused to bind himself down to play a match of chess at any future period. He cannot, therefore, now accept the conditions offered of binding himself to play at any time between October and January next. As a fact, I fear that Dr Zukertort will not be in England at that period, as I believe he purports starting almost immediately on a protracted tour round the world.

I have no doubt that on his return from this tour Dr Zukertort will be quite ready to make a match with Mr Steinitz on reasonable conditions, such as those offered, to promote which, when the time arrives, I shall be happy to use my good offices.’

It will be noted that no reference to the world championship occurred in these exchanges. However, it was evoked in a follow-up item in the next issue of the Chronicle (18 July 1883, page 50). We quoted it in full in C.N. 3750.

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EDIT <Boomie>

"The Polish-Jewish master Johannes Zukertort"

I don't think appending "Jewish" here is appropriate.

#############################################

EDIT <OhioChessFan>

<<Born in Prague, Wilhelm Steinitz was regarded as the best player in the world ever since his victory over Adolf Anderssen in their 1866 match.1 >

I think it was before that. In any case, surely there's a better source than Wiki.

In 1883, he won the international tournament in London, defeating nearly every leading player in the world.

I don't like that construction. It just seems clunky. Maybe list the leading players he beat?

In 1886 these two great chess minds sat down to play what is now regarded by most chess historians as the first official World Chess Championship.

This demands a footnote. Yes, there is no doubt as to its truthfulness, but it needs to be cited. Kaspy's work would be a good source methinks.>

Zukertort vs Steinitz, 1886 
(D10) Queen's Gambit Declined Slav, 46 moves, 0-1

Steinitz vs Zukertort, 1886 
(C45) Scotch Game, 46 moves, 0-1

Zukertort vs Steinitz, 1886 
(D10) Queen's Gambit Declined Slav, 47 moves, 1-0

3 games

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