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Dr. Carl was a Romantic!
Compiled by fredthebear
--*--

Dr. Carl Hartlaub of Germany did not hesitate to sacrifice a piece!

* Here's a link to some fabulous chess brilliancies: https://www.chess.com/article/view/...

* Glossary of Chess Terms: http://www.arkangles.com/kchess/glo...

* Garry Kasparov Teaches Chess (Batsford 1986): Game Collection: Garry Kasparov Teaches Chess

* By date: Game Collection: King's Gambit attacking games

* POTD: Game Collection: POTD Kings Gambit Accepted - KGA

* Vienna 1903 KG games: Game Collection: Vienna 1903

* Short Selection for White:
Game Collection: Repertoire for White

* Oskar plays 1e4: Oskar Oglaza

* Chess Principles: https://www.reddit.com/r/chess/comm...

* Linus: https://zoboko.com/text/o1qn0yy8/ch...

* List of gambits: https://detailedpedia.com/wiki-List...

* Freaky Fridays: https://allchessopenings.blogspot.c...

"Chess first of all teaches you to be objective." – Alexander Alekhine

"Among a great many other things that chess teaches you is to control the initial excitement you feel when you see something that looks good. It trains you to think before grabbing and to think just as objectively when you're in trouble." -- Stanley Kubrick

"Chess helps you to concentrate, improve your logic. It teaches you to play by the rules, take responsibility for your actions, how to problem solve in an uncertain environment." – Garry Kasparov

"Daring ideas are like chessmen moved forward. They may be beaten, but they may start a winning game." – Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe

"To avoid losing a piece, many a person has lost the game." – Savielly Tartakower

"Battles are won by slaughter and maneuver. The greater the general, the more he contributes in maneuver, the less he demands in slaughter." ― Winston S. Churchill

The Two Friends

Two friends, in Monomotapa,
Had all their interests combined.
Their friendship, faithful and refined,
Our country can't exceed, do what it may.
One night, when potent Sleep had laid
All still within our planet's shade,
One of the two gets up alarmed,
Runs over to the other's palace,
And hastily the servants rallies.
His startled friend, quick armed,
With purse and sword his comrade meets,
And thus right kindly greets:
"You seldom com'st at such an hour;
I take you for a man of sounder mind
Than to abuse the time for sleep designed.
Have lost your purse, by Fortune's power?
Here's mine. Have suffered insult, or a blow,
I have here my sword – to avenge it let us go." "No," said his friend, "no need I feel
Of either silver, gold, or steel;
I thank you for your friendly zeal.
In sleep I saw you rather sad,
And thought the truth might be as bad.
Unable to endure the fear,
That cursed dream has brought me here."

Which think you, reader, loved the most!
If doubtful this, one truth may be proposed:
There's nothing sweeter than a real friend:
Not only is he prompt to lend –
An angler delicate, he fishes
The very deepest of your wishes,
And spares your modesty the task
His friendly aid to ask.
A dream, a shadow, wakes his fear,
When pointing at the object dear.

Drive sober or get pulled over.

The Old Man And His Sons

All power is feeble with dissension:
For this I quote the Phrygian slave.
If anything I add to his invention,
It is our manners to engrave,
And not from any envious wishes; –
I'm not so foolishly ambitious.
Phaedrus enriches often his story,
In quest – I doubt it not – of glory:
Such thoughts were idle in my breast.
An aged man, near going to his rest,
His gathered sons thus solemnly addressed:
"To break this bunch of arrows you may try;
And, first, the string that binds them I untie." The eldest, having tried with might and main,
Exclaimed, "This bundle I resign
To muscles sturdier than mine."
The second tried, and bowed himself in vain.
The youngest took them with the like success.
All were obliged their weakness to confess.
Unharmed the arrows passed from son to son;
Of all they did not break a single one.
"Weak fellows!" said their sire, "I now must show What in the case my feeble strength can do."
They laughed, and thought their father but in joke, Till, one by one, they saw the arrows broke.
"See, concord's power!" replied the sire; "as long As you in love agree, you will be strong.
I go, my sons, to join our fathers good;
Now promise me to live as brothers should,
And soothe by this your dying father's fears."
Each strictly promised with a flood of tears.
Their father took them by the hand, and died;
And soon the virtue of their vows was tried.
Their sire had left a large estate
Involved in lawsuits intricate;
Here seized a creditor, and there
A neighbour levied for a share.
At first the trio nobly bore
The brunt of all this legal war.
But short their friendship as It was rare.
Whom blood had joined – and small the wonder! – The force of interest drove asunder;
And, as is wont in such affairs,
Ambition, envy, were co-heirs.
In parcelling their sire's estate,
They quarrel, quibble, litigate,
Each aiming to supplant the other.
The judge, by turns, condemns each brother.
Their creditors make new assault,
Some pleading error, some default.
The sundered brothers disagree;
For counsel one, have counsels three.
All lose their wealth; and now their sorrows
Bring fresh to mind those broken arrows.

"What is the object of playing a Gambit opening? To acquire a reputation of being a dashing player at the cost of losing a game." — Siegbert Tarrasch

"Do the things that interest you and do them with all your heart. Don't be concerned about whether people are watching you or criticizing you. The chances are that they aren't paying any attention to you. It's your attention to yourself that is so stultifying. But you have to disregard yourself as completely as possible. If you fail the first time then you'll just have to try harder the second time. After all, there's no real reason why you should fail. Just stop thinking about yourself." — Eleanor Roosevelt

"It doesn't require much for misfortune to strike in the King's Gambit, one incautious move, and Black can be on the edge of the abyss." — Anatoly Karpov

Chess Explorations (13) By Edward Winter -- see blue link
Schuster vs C Carls, 1914 
(B15) Caro-Kann, 11 moves, 0-1

KGD Falkbeer Cntrgambit. Staunton (C31) 0-1 Philidor's Legacy
G Schaaff vs C Hartlaub, 1907 
(C31) King's Gambit Declined, Falkbeer Counter Gambit, 16 moves, 0-1

Italian (C50) 1-0 f6 is bad, g5 worse! Move pieces, not pawns!
C Hartlaub vs H Rosenbaum, 1892 
(C50) Giuoco Piano, 6 moves, 1-0

Scotch Gambit. Anderssen Attack(C56) 1-0 7 of last 8 are checks
C Hartlaub vs Lasker, 1904 
(C56) Two Knights, 21 moves, 1-0

Philidor Def. (C41) 1-0 Unpin, Q sac, Legall's Mate
C Hartlaub vs Worch, 1890 
(C41) Philidor Defense, 8 moves, 1-0

Bishop's Opening: Boden-Kieseritsky Gambit (C42) 1-0 Really??
C Hartlaub vs Lasker, 1908 
(C27) Vienna Game, 17 moves, 1-0

DGA, Copenhagen Def. (C21) 1-0 Putting out fires with gasoline.
C Hartlaub vs M W Testa, 1912 
(C21) Center Game, 24 moves, 1-0

Spanish Game: Bird Variation (C61) 0-1 A Tour de Force!!
V Kahn vs C Hartlaub, 1916 
(C61) Ruy Lopez, Bird's Defense, 16 moves, 0-1

11...Qh1+! is a decoy which sets up a double check and mate
Schwartz vs C Hartlaub, 1918 
(C50) Giuoco Piano, 13 moves, 0-1

Q sac+R sac+minor piece sac = a fantastic game
C Hartlaub vs V Benary, 1911 
(D32) Queen's Gambit Declined, Tarrasch, 20 moves, 1-0

English Def. Hartlaub Gambit. Accepted (A40) 0-1 Long range str
C Carls vs C Hartlaub, 1921 
(A40) Queen's Pawn Game, 25 moves, 0-1

Sicilian Def. McDonnell Attack (B21) 1-0 3 piece sacs & R lift
C Hartlaub vs Fleischer, 1913 
(B21) Sicilian, 2.f4 and 2.d4, 19 moves, 1-0

Italian Game: Scotch Gambit. Max Lange Attack (C55) 1-0
C Hartlaub vs A Brinckmann, 1912
(C55) Two Knights Defense, 33 moves, 1-0

English Opening: General (A10) 0-1 Watch out for Carl!
C Carls vs C Hartlaub, 1915 
(A10) English, 39 moves, 0-1

Duras Gambit: General (B00) 0-1 Who knew?
Schwartze vs C Hartlaub, 1905 
(B00) Uncommon King's Pawn Opening, 17 moves, 0-1

B's Opening: Boden-Kieseritsky Gambit (C27) 1-0 Decline 7.Bh6
C Hartlaub vs Eisele, 1889 
(C27) Vienna Game, 14 moves, 1-0

Polish Opening: General (A00) 1-0 Daring Mayet's Mate!
C Hartlaub vs Teichmann, 1922 
(A00) Uncommon Opening, 22 moves, 1-0

Sarratt Attack (D00) 0-1 a N on the rim is dim, but two Ns win
O Antze vs C Hartlaub, 1910 
(D00) Queen's Pawn Game, 26 moves, 0-1

Urusov Gambit
C Hartlaub vs P S Leonhardt, 1906
(C24) Bishop's Opening, 28 moves, 1-0

19 games

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