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g15713's favorite Double Rook endgames
Compiled by g15713
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The main two chess books I found on this ending are the below sources (Müller & Emms):
Chess 'User: whiteshark says they are <Neglected ♖♖ endgames>

Karsten Müller and Yakov Konoval in their illustrious 2016 chess book,
Understanding Rook Endgames, devote a chapter on this ending - pages 238 to 244.
<"There are several differences from single-rook endings.
1) Mating attacks are more often possible.
2) An extra pawn gives better winning prospects if it helps to shield the attacking king.
3) They have more of a 'middlegame character' than the more technical single-rook endings.
4) Isolated pawns are even weaker, as now two rooks can be forced to defend them passively.">

Karsten Mueller from his DVD, Chess Endgames 13: Double Rook Endgames
<"Double rook endings occur frequently and are different from single rook endings in several respects.
Many guidelines remain valid of course like activity is the order of the day, the king wants to blockade passed pawns, the rooks does not and the rook belongs behind passed pawns be they friendly or enemy. But there are also many new motifs. Especially king safety plays a much larger role due to the increased firepower on the board. Therefore the value of extras pawns often also increases as they can provide the king with much needed shelter.">

John Emms in his marvelous 2008 chess book, The Survival Guide to Rook Endings,
dedicates a chapter on this ending - pages 141 to 151.
<"Double rook endings are far harder to categorize into distinct sections,
as so much depends on the placement and activity of the various pieces.
Double rook endings tend to be much more tactical.
Two rooks working together can be become a powerful force, capable of weaving mating patterns around the opposing king. Because of this, king safety is an extremely important feature.
In general, a small material advantage in a double rook ending (for example, a pawn) promises the attacking side more winning chances than in a single rook ending. One of the obvious reasons for this is that the extra pawn can provide important cover for the king. Also lone pawns are more exposed to attack in double rook endings.">

John Nunn in his second volume, Nunn's Chess Endings which focuses primarily on rook endgames, covers this ending with a few pages 286 to 288.
<"...two rooks have a considerable attacking potential. This often manifests itself in the familiar case of doubled rooks on the seventh, but a pair of rooks can directly attack the enemy king in many other situations. Even if such an attack doesn't lead to mate, it can gain enough time to allow the rooks to capture some enemy pawns.
If both sides promote, the position is more a middlegame than an endgame,
and in this case king-safety is likely to be the most important factor.">

-------Double Rook endgames--------
White has a g-pawn, 5:4 --> 1:0|| - Game 1
Black has a g-pawn, 4:4 --> 0:1|| - Game 2
Black has a g-pawn, 5:5 --> 0:1|| - Game 3
White has a g-pawn, 3:3 --> 1:0|| - Game 4
White has a f-pawn, 2:2 --> 1:0|| - Game 5
Black has a e-pawn, 4:4 --> 0:1|| - Game 6
Black has a e-pawn, 1:2 --> 0:1|| - Game 7
Black has a e-pawn, 0:1 --> 0:1|| - Game 8
White has a d-pawn, 4:3 --> 1:0|| - Game 9
Black has a d-pawn, 5:5 --> 0:1|| - Game 10
White has a d-pawn, 5:6 --> 1:0|| - Game 11
White has a c-pawn, 6:6 --> 1:0|| - Game 12
White has a c-pawn, 5:5 --> 1:0|| - Game 13
White has a c-pawn, 5:4 --> 1:0|| - Game 14
Black has a b-pawn, 2:4 --> 0:1|| - Game 15
White has _a-pawn, 4:4 --> 1:0|| - Game 16

(White has a-pawn while Black has 2 g-pawns, 4:6 --> 1:2 --> 0:1|| - Game 17
Black had a two pawn advantage but White had two rooks on the seventh)

(Black has a c-pawn, 4:5 --> 0:1|| - Game 18
Black has one pawn advantage but the Black king is about to be mated or lose a rook)

(White has b- and e-pawns while Black has f-pawn, 7:7 --> 1:0|| - Game 19
White has one pawn advantage but Black has an advanced passed f-pawn)

(White has a- & g- & h-pawns while Black has b- & h-pawns, 4:4 --> 1:0|| - Game 20
White has one pawn advantage but Kamsky misses 51. Rb5!)

(White has b- & e-pawns while Black has h-pawn, 2:1 --> 1:0|| - Game 21
White has one pawn advantage and two rooks on the seventh but Black has a passed h-pawn)

White has connected passed pawns versus 2 isolated passed pawns, 2:2 --> 1:0|| - Game 22

White <"even with an extra pawn in the double rook ending, his winning chances were small; but this game provides an object example of the idea that in such endings, in which both sides possess weaknesses, active play is of utmost importance."> - Game 23
Chess 'User: perfidious

Defender must be careful about exchanging a pair of rooks
The cliché that <"All rook and pawn endings are drawn."> rings true except for those that aren't!
See the following games (7 & 8) where exchanging a couple of rooks led to a lost.

Choicest (most favorite) games are 20 and 21

#01 58. Rxd6+ wins (♖♖♙ vs. ♜♜)
Arkell vs Suba, 1991 
(A62) Benoni, Fianchetto Variation, 109 moves, 1-0

#02 46...Kh6?/Rg3! (♖♖ vs.♜♜♟)
V Jorquera Cabello vs E Barbosa, 2014 
(A07) King's Indian Attack, 80 moves, 0-1

#03 56. f3?/Kf1! (♖♖ vs.♜♜♟)
Dragnev vs A Esipenko, 2018 
(E51) Nimzo-Indian, 4.e3, 68 moves, 1/2-1/2

#04 48...Rfxd5?/Kh6! (♖♖♙ vs. ♜♜)
Tiviakov vs Timoshenko, 1991 
(C77) Ruy Lopez, 73 moves, 1/2-1/2

#05 81...Kd7?/Kf5! draw (♖♖♙v♜♜)
A Nosenko vs I Janik, 2016 
(A41) Queen's Pawn Game (with ...d6), 103 moves, 1-0

#06 72. Kb3?/Kb5! draw (♖♖v♜♜♟)
R Dyckhoff vs Eliskases, 1930 
(E21) Nimzo-Indian, Three Knights, 85 moves, 0-1

#07 51. Rxe4+?/Rc5+! draw (♖♖v♜♜♟)
Schmittdiel vs J Brenninkmeijer, 1991 
(C19) French, Winawer, Advance, 53 moves, 0-1

#08 56. Rxg3?/Rh2! draw (♖♖v♜♜♟)
B Ryan vs R Wetzell, 1993 
(A34) English, Symmetrical, 60 moves, 0-1

#09 64...Rf1?/Ra1! draw (♖♖♙ v ♜♜)
L'Ami vs F Elsness, 2014 
(D15) Queen's Gambit Declined Slav, 76 moves, 1/2-1/2

#10 44. Kf6?/Re8! or Rf1! (♖♖v♜♜♟)
A Vajda vs Nimzowitsch, 1927 
(B00) Uncommon King's Pawn Opening, 46 moves, 0-1

#11 57. Rc7?/Re8! (♖♖♙ v ♜♜)
Morozevich vs Kasimdzhanov, 2002 
(B31) Sicilian, Rossolimo Variation, 69 moves, 1-0

#12 58. Ra7+?/Rd5! wins (♖♖♙ v ♜♜)
Petursson vs Tiviakov, 1989 
(E38) Nimzo-Indian, Classical, 4...c5, 61 moves, 1/2-1/2

#13 46. Rxd3?/Kd2! wins (♖♖♙v♜♜)
Marshall vs L Rosen, 1900 
(C14) French, Classical, 62 moves, 1-0

#14 55...Kd8?/Ke8! draw (♖♖♙v♜♜)
B Ivanovic vs de Firmian, 1983 
(B99) Sicilian, Najdorf, 7...Be7 Main line, 64 moves, 1-0

#15 77. Kf3?/Kd4! draw (♖♖ v ♜♜♟)
U Goy vs H Bastian, 2008 
(E97) King's Indian, 112 moves, 0-1

#16 56. Rb8?/Kb6! wins (♖♖♙ v ♜♜)
Gipslis vs K Grigorian, 1964 
(A66) Benoni, 69 moves, 1/2-1/2

#17 62. Rfb7! 76...Re2! (♖♖+a- v ♜♜+2g-)
F Berkes vs D Yuffa, 2018 
(B04) Alekhine's Defense, Modern, 83 moves, 1/2-1/2

#18 56...Rh3?/Ra3! draw (♖♖ v ♜♜♟)
B Ivanovic vs J Rukavina, 1984 
(B06) Robatsch, 58 moves, 1-0

#19 45...Kf5?/Kd5! (♖♖+b-+e- v ♜♜+f-)
P Freisler vs Plachetka, 1986 
(A07) King's Indian Attack, 63 moves, 1-0

#20 51.a6?/Rb5! (♖♖+a-+g-+h- v ♜♜+b-+h-)
Kamsky vs de Firmian, 1990 
(A46) Queen's Pawn Game, 67 moves, 1/2-1/2

#21 38...Rxe4?/Rc8+! (♖♖+b-+e- v ♜♜+h-)
Vogt vs Y Boidman, 2000 
(B27) Sicilian, 82 moves, 1-0

#22 41...Kg7 42. f5 Rc8 = (4 rooks & (a- + c- versus e- + f-)
Adianto vs R C Balinas, 1987 
(D12) Queen's Gambit Declined Slav, 65 moves, 1-0

#23 23...Rac8 Black can draw (4 rooks & many pawns)
Tal vs Miles, 1979 
(B52) Sicilian, Canal-Sokolsky (Rossolimo) Attack, 54 moves, 1-0

23 games

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