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  1. Hanging Pawns
    A pair of pawns on adjacent files that are separated from all other pawns are known as "Hanging Pawns" (a term coined by Steinitz).

    Hanging pawns possess strengths and weaknesses.

    The elements of strength include the possibility of opening files through their advance and with this comes an increase in space, and the possibility of controlling key squares that can be used as outposts for Knights and Bishops.

    On the other hand they can also be weak. They can only be defended by pieces. This vulnerability can be exploited by attacking them with pieces, forcing the opponent to protect them with pieces. The defending pieces can then be attacked and exchanged at a suitable moment and this can often result in the win of a pawn or forcing another pawn weakness elsewhere. They can also be weakened by forcing the advance of one of them leaving the other one backward and a hole into which a piece can be placed. A third way of exploiting their weakness is to attack them with a pawn of your own, this can force a pawn exchange that results in an isolated pawn.

    The current view is that hanging pawns are weak if their side is behind in development but strong if their side is ahead in development.

    These games illustrate the strengths and weaknesses of the hanging pawns

    31 games, 1873-1994

  2. Hastings 1895
    NOTE : This collection has now been superceded by Hastings (1895)

    The chess club of the English coastal town of Hastings was founded in 1882. In 1895 the club organized a tournament that was the strongest ever held up to that time. Taking place over the month of August all the leading players of the day participated. Among the participants were the veterans Blackburne and Bird and the young masters Janowski, Schlechter, Teichmann and Walbrodt. The favourites were Lasker, Steinitz, Tarrasch and Chigorin. However, the winner turned out to be the then relatively unknown American Harry Nelson Pillsbury who was playing in his first major tournament. The tournament was memorable for a number of masterpieces created and a very exciting finish with the lead changing hands in the last three rounds.

    -

    A very special thanks to <Calli> and <keypusher> for the link to this article that has an interview with the tournament winner : https://picasaweb.google.com/Caissa... Click on the magnifying glass to read it.

    -

    At a banquet Chigorin announced that the top prizewinners had been invited to St. Petersburg for a match-tournament to begin later in December that year. ( See <keypusher>'s Game Collection: St. Petersburg 1895-96 for that event ).

    _

    The Final Standings were :

    1st Pillsbury 16½ points (+15, =3, -3);

    2nd Chigorin 16 points (+14, =4, -3);

    3rd Lasker 15½ points (+14, =3, -4);

    4th Tarrasch 14 points (+12, =4, -5);

    5th Steinitz 13 points (+11, =4, -6);

    6th Schiffers 12 points (+9, =6, -6);

    =7th von Bardeleben 11½ points (+8, =7, -6);

    =7th Teichmann 11½ points (+8, =7, -6);

    9th Schlechter 11 points (+5, =12, -4);

    10th Blackburne 10½ points (+9, =3, -9);

    11th Walbrodt 10 points (+6, =8, -7);

    =12th Burn 9½ points (+8, =3, -10);

    =12th Janowski 9½ points (+7, =5, -9);

    =12th Mason 9½ points (+7, =5, -9);

    =15th Bird 9 points (+4, =10, -7);

    =15th Gunsberg 9 points (+7, =4, -10);

    =17th Albin 8½ points (+5, =7, -9);

    =17th Marco 8½ points (+5, =7, -9);

    19th Pollock 8 points (+6, =4, -11);

    =20th Mieses 7½ points (+4, =7, -10);

    =20th Tinsley 7½ points (+7, =1, -13);

    22nd Vergani 3 points (+2, =2, -17).

    -

    table[
    1. Pillsbury * 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 ½ ½ 1 1 1 1 1 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 2. Chigorin 1 * 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 ½ 1 0 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 1 ½ 1 1 3. Lasker 1 0 * 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 ½ 1 1 ½ 1 1 ½ 1 1 4. Tarrasch 0 0 1 * 1 1 ½ 0 ½ 1 1 1 1 0 1 ½ 1 1 0 ½ 1 1 5. Steinitz 0 1 0 0 * 1 1 ½ ½ 1 1 ½ 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 ½ 1 1 6. Schiffers 0 1 0 0 0 * ½ ½ 0 1 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 1 0 ½ 1 ½ 1 1 7. von Bardeleben 0 0 1 ½ 0 ½ * ½ ½ 0 0 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 1 1 0 1 8. Teichmann 0 0 0 1 ½ ½ ½ * ½ 0 0 1 ½ 1 1 0 ½ 1 ½ 1 1 1 9. Schlechter 1 0 0 ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ * ½ ½ 1 0 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 0 10. Blackburne ½ 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 ½ * 0 1 1 0 ½ 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 11. Walbrodt ½ ½ 0 0 0 0 1 1 ½ 1 * 0 0 ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 1 1 12. Burn 0 0 0 0 ½ ½ 0 0 0 0 1 * 1 0 ½ 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 13. Janowski 0 1 0 0 1 0 ½ ½ 1 0 1 0 * ½ ½ 0 0 1 ½ 1 0 1 14. Mason 0 0 ½ 1 0 ½ 0 0 0 1 ½ 1 ½ * 1 0 ½ 0 1 1 0 1 15. Bird 0 ½ 0 0 1 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 * 1 1 ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 16. Gunsberg 0 0 0 ½ 0 0 0 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 1 1 0 * 1 ½ 0 1 0 0 17. Albin 0 ½ ½ 0 0 1 ½ ½ ½ 0 1 0 1 ½ 0 0 * 0 0 1 1 ½ 18. Marco ½ 0 0 0 0 ½ 0 0 ½ 1 ½ 0 0 1 ½ ½ 1 * 1 1 0 ½ 19. Pollock 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ 0 1 1 1 0 * 0 0 1 20. Mieses 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 0 ½ 1 0 0 0 0 ½ 0 0 0 1 * 1 1 21. Tinsley 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 ½ 1 0 1 1 0 * 1 22. Vergani 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 ½ ½ 0 0 0 *]table

    -

    231 games, 1895

  3. Howick & Pakuranga Times Auckland International
    -

    Taking place from the 26th to the 31st of January 2003 this tournament was organized by Paul Stanley Spiller to give young New Zealand players the chance to gain experience of international events and present opportunities to gain FIDE ratings and IM norms. It was held in the Pakuranga Country Club in Auckland, New Zealand. IA Gary D Bekker served as Chief Arbiter.

    -

    The Final Standings :

    -

    1st Froehlich 7½ points (+6, =3, -0);

    2nd Sermek 7 points (+6, =2, -1);

    3rd Ker 6½ points (+5, =3, -1);

    4th McLaren 6 points (+5, =2, -2);

    =5th Guthrie 5½ points (+4, =3, -2);

    =5th Smith 5½ points (+4, =3, -2);

    =5th Kulashko 5½ points (+4, =3, -2);

    =5th Watson 5½ points (+4, =3, -2);

    =5th Zakaria 5½ points (+3, =5, -1);

    =10th Beach 5 points (+4, =2, -3);

    =10th Van Der Hoorn 5 points (+4, =2, -3);

    =10th Wang 5 points (+4, =2, -3);

    =10th Spain 5 points (+4, =2, -3);

    =10th Rippis 5 points (+3, =4, -2);

    =15th Garbett 4½ points (+4, =1, -4);

    =15th Safarian 4½ points (+4, =1, -4);

    =15th Anderson 4½ points (+4, =1, -4);

    =15th R. Song 4½ points (+4, =1, -4);

    =15th B. Jones 4½ points (+4, =1, -4);

    =15th Gibbons 4½ points (+3, =3, -3);

    =15th Bennett 4½ points (+3, =3, -3);

    =15th Green 4½ points (+3, =3, -3);

    =15th Goodhue 4½ points (+3, =3, -3);

    =15th L. Jones 4½ points (+3, =3, -3);

    =15th Morrison 4½ points (+3, =3, -3);

    =26th Goffin 4 points (+2, =4, -3);

    =26th Thornton 4 points (+1, =6, -2);

    =28th Lim 3½ points (+3, =1, -5);

    =28th Stuart 3½ points (+2, =3, -4);

    =28th A. Song 3½ points (+2, =3, -4);

    31st Xu 2½ points (+2, =1, -6);

    =32nd Otene 1½ points (+1, =1, -7);

    =32nd Zhang 1½ points (+1, =1, -7);

    34th Pan 0 points (+0, =0, -9).

    -

    153 games, 2003

  4. I have never opened with the QP - on principle
    Bobby Fischer was addicted to 1.e4 but this very small collection shows that in spite of his pronouncement he wasn't totally inflexible about this.
    4 games, 1954-1970

  5. Isaac Boleslavsky - Selected Games
    Published by Caissa Books (Publishing) Ltd in 1988

    ISBN 1 870816 06 4

    Edited and translated by Jimmy Adams this book was an English translation of Soviet Grandmaster Isaac Boleslavsky 's book "Izbrannye Partii" ( Selected Games ) and augmented with a further selection of his games post 1955.

    Boleslavsky (1919 - 1977) was an outstanding Opening Theoretician and pioneered systems in the King's Indian and Sicilian Defences. The high point of his playing career was shared first place in the Candidates Tournament of 1950. However, at heart he was primarily a researcher and analyst and he was held in very high regard by his peers. Tigran Vartanovich Petrosian selected him to be his second for the World Championship Matches 1963 - 1969.

    -

    From The Author

    I became acquainted with chess in 1928, when I was nine years old. The children's chess movement then was still in its incipiency. The House of Pioneers with chess circles appeared several years later. Up to the age of fourteen years I did not play a single tournament game, while even casual games I played very rarely because of the lack of partners.

    I learned to play through books. The first of my primers were "Chess Fundamentals" by Capablanca, "First Book of Chess" by G.Y. Levenfish, and Y.G. Rokhlin's manual. These handbooks gave me my first knowledge of the principles of play, about the elements of tactics and the positional basis of the game. With help from these, virtually without practice, I brought my play up to approximately the strength of third category. Books played an enormous role also in my further perfection. In 1939, when I achieved the rank of master, the number of games I had played with first category players did not exceed twenty, while masters I had in all encountered twice. Nowadays I cannot imagine a strong player not possessing a firm foundation of theory.

    But, speaking of a knowledge of theory. I by no means wish to belittle the role of practice. A rapid growth of a chessplayer is possible only by a harmonious combination of the first and second. A too "bookish" approach to the game of chess created in my play defects which I had to subsequently overcome for quite a long time. An insufficiently concrete approach to a position: overestimation of the strength of the two bishops, unnecessary fear of the weakness of squares and pawns - this is what I had to eliminate in my tournament practice.

    A great impression was made upon me by Alekhine's book "My Best Games", with which I had become acquainted in 1932. I was attracted not only by Alekhine's brilliant combinations, but also the logicality, the consistency featured in the collection of games, the purposefulness of each move, the immediate exploitation of the slightest mistake by the opponent.

    The creative work of the world's best chessplayers in the first instance Alekhine revealed to me the aesthetic value of the game of chess. In playing, I did not strive for victory just for the sake of points, and considered that only the win of a consistently played game could give real satisfaction. I did not agree with the now widespread view that, since chess is a struggle, then mistakes on both sides are inevitable, natural, and do not reduce the value of a game. Indeed, the game of chess is a struggle, but in the first place a struggle of ideas, and therefore the winner, if he wants to prove the value of his victory, ought to prove the correctness of his ideas.

    The game of chess is inexhaustible, and a single person, no matter how great his talent, cannot achieve perfection in it. However, striving for perfection, that is for faultless play, is the duty of every chessplayer, begining with first category and ending with the world champion.

    In the present collection, for the most part, are included games consistently played by the winning side. There are games in which the chances fluctuate from side to side, but an exceptionally complicated and sharp struggle makes these interesting for the reader. In the collection are included several games with a drawn result, in which attack and defence were on an equal height.

    With regard to the comments on the openings of the games, I have stuck to this aim: not to deal with, or scarcely deal with, well known openings and variations which the reader can find in any manual, and, on the other hand, dwell more or less at length on topical variations which are the objects of analysis and debate by our masters and grandmasters.

    Isaac Boleslavsky.

    -

    180 games, 1938-1971

  6. London 1922
    NOTE : This collection has now been superceded by London (1922)

    During the 19th Century London, England had been the setting for some great tournaments. The first international tourney in 1851, the first double round robin tourney in 1862, the contest of 1883 and Lasker's triumph of 1899. In December 1921 the British Chess Federation decided to hold an international tournament of sixteen players as the main event of its 1922 congress. Invitations were sent to Capablanca, Alyekhin, Rubinstein, Bogolyubov, Reti, Tartakover, Vidmar, Euwe, Kostich and Marshall but the last two named players had problems with their travelling expenses and were unable to accept. In addition the current British Champion and the Champions of Australia and Canada were also invited. Held in the Central Hall Westminster, London the tournament ran from the 31st of July to the 19th of August, 1922. Many games played in this tourney would later grace the best games collections of a number of players.

    -

    table[
    Pts 1. Capablanca * ½ 1 ½ 1 1 ½ ½ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 13 2. Alyekhin ½ * ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 1 1 ½ 1 1 1 11½ 3. Vidmar 0 ½ * 0 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 1 1 11 4. Rubinstein ½ 0 1 * ½ ½ 1 1 ½ 0 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 10½ 5. Bogolyubov 0 ½ 0 ½ * ½ 1 1 0 1 ½ 0 1 1 1 1 9 6. Reti 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ * ½ ½ 1 1 ½ 1 0 1 0 1 8½ 7. Tartakover ½ ½ 0 0 0 ½ * ½ 1 0 1 1 1 ½ 1 1 8½ 8. Maroczy ½ ½ ½ 0 0 ½ ½ * 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ 0 1 1 8 9. Yates 0 0 0 ½ 1 0 0 0 * 1 1 1 1 1 ½ 1 8 10. Atkins 0 0 ½ 1 0 0 1 ½ 0 * 0 1 ½ ½ 0 1 6 11. Euwe 0 0 0 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ 0 1 * 0 1 0 1 1 5½ 12. Znosko-Borovsky 0 0 0 ½ 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 * 1 ½ 1 0 5 13. Wahltuch 0 ½ 0 0 0 1 0 ½ 0 ½ 0 0 * 1 1 ½ 5 14. Morrison 0 0 0 0 0 0 ½ 1 0 ½ 1 ½ 0 * 0 1 4½ 15. Watson 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 ½ 1 0 0 0 1 * 1 4½ 16. Marotti 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 ½ 0 0 * 1½]table

    -

    Allocation Of Prizes :

    1st Capablanca 250 Pounds Sterling

    2nd Alyekhin 150 Pounds Sterling

    3rd Vidmar 100 Pounds Sterling

    4th Rubinstein 70 Pounds Sterling

    5th Bogolyubov 40 Pounds Sterling

    6th= Reti & Tartakover 30 Pounds Sterling

    7th= Reti & Tartakover 25 Pounds Sterling

    8th= Maroczy & Yates 20 Pounds Sterling

    -


    120 games, 1922

  7. Lone Pine 1979
    NOTE : This collection has now been superceded by Lone Pine (1979)

    This 1979 tournament held from the 25th of March to the 4th of April was the ninth in the series of annual events that have been held in the small Californian town of Lone Pine. Lone Pine was the home of American millionaire Louis D Statham and for this tournament he put up a prize fund of more than $45,000 which attracted 27 Grandmasters and 22 International Masters from 18 countries. The final number of participants reached seventy-three.

    The lead changed hands a number of times in this nine round Swiss Tournament but in the end four players; Liberzon, Gheorghiu, Gligoric and Hort shared top honours. They each received $8,875 and Gligoric and Liberzon made history by becoming the first players to win twice at Lone Pine. Liberzon was the sole winner of the 1975 event and Gligoric was a joint winner in the 1972 event. Hans Ree could have joined the leaders but an oversight in a winning rook ending against Sahovic in the last round cost him a GM norm and dropped him into the second tier of place getters which included Larsen, Gruenfeld, Lombardy, Sahovic and Sosonko. They each received $1008.

    Another notable performance was that of the then 19-year-old Yasser Seirawan who played a field that included all four winners and in the process he defeated Miles and Larsen as well. Seirawan and the four winners scored the only GM results. Seirawan, along with DeFirmian and van der Sterren earnt IM titles. Morris, Bradford, Peters and Odendahl achieved IM norms whilst Root and Strauss achieved FM norms.

    Rajan Ayyar pulled out after five rounds. Oleg Romanishin and Vitaly Tseshkovsky were slated to play but when it was discovered that Korchnoi would also be playing the Soviet authorities cancelled their entries.

    -

    Two brilliancy prizes were awarded in each round. The following were the recipients :

    Round 1 - Grefe and Barle

    Round 2 - Seirawan and Shamkovich

    Round 3 - Bradford and Sahovic

    Round 4 - Bradford and Gligoric

    Round 5 - Reshevsky and Petursson

    Round 6 - Gruenfeld and Formanek

    Round 7 - Gruenfeld and Shamkovich

    Round 8 - Bisguier and Lein

    Round 9 - Denker and Browne

    -

    Final Placings and Points Scored :

    1 - 4 Liberzon, Gheorghiu, Gligoric, Hort 6½;

    5 - 10 Lombardy, Sosonko, Ree, Larsen, Gruenfeld, Sahovic 6;

    11 - 22 Seirawan, Kaplan, Reshevsky, Peters, Morris, Korchnoi, Diesen, Lein, Shamkovich, Tarjan, Bisguier, Pachman 5½;

    23 - 33 DeFirmian, Biyiasas, Olafsson, Odendahl, Miles, Zaltsman, Ligterink, Sigurjonsson, Benko, Browne, Rajkovic 5;

    34 - 44 Bradford, Fedorowicz, van der Sterren, Ostojic, Chandler, Quinteros, Soltis, Janosevic, Christiansen, van Riemsdijk, Weinstein 4½;

    45 - 57 Grefe, Root, Barle, Paolozzi, Bohm, van der Wiel, Petursson, Strauss, McCambridge, Day, Rind, Watson, Formanek 4;

    58 - 60 Shirazi, Benjamin, Matera 3½;

    61 - 68 Zlotnikov, Wilder, Rigo, Paul Whitehead, Youngworth, Blocker, Nikolic, Denker 3;

    69 - 70 Silman, Balinas 2½;

    71 -72 Jay Whitehead, Thibault 2;

    73 Ayyar 1.

    -

    The Tournament Director was Isaac Kashdan.


    324 games, 1979

  8. Mikhail Tal - Underrated Endgame Artist
    Mikhail Tal was such a sacrificial and attacking genius that his endgame skills are often overlooked. These games illustrate his prowess in the endgame.
    52 games, 1951-1992

  9. Missed Opportunities & Misfires
    "Man is but an ass" - Bottom in 'A Midsummer Night's Dream'
    21 games, 1851-2010

  10. Modern Chess Miniatures
    The games in the book by Leonard William Barden and Wolfgang Heidenfeld

    Published by Routledge & Kegan Paul in 1960.

    203 games, 1862-1960

  11. Montpellier Candidates 1985
    Note : This collection has now been superceded by Montpellier Candidates (1985)

    This tournament took place in the French city of Montpellier from the 12th of October to the 3rd of November 1985. It was a Category 14 event with an Average FIDE rating of 2593.

    Yusupov, Vaganian, Sokolov, Timman, Tal, Beliavsky, Chernin, Portisch, Seirawan, Short, Nogueiras, and Spraggett all qualified from the Biel, Taxco and Tunis Interzonals. Korchnoi, Ribli and Smyslov were qualified from the 1983 - 84 Candidates matches whilst Spassky was chosen by the organising federation.

    Crosstable

    table[
    Rating Pts 1.Yusupov (2600) x 0 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 ½ 9 2.Vaganian (2625) 1 x ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 1 9 3.Sokolov (2555) 0 ½ x ½ ½ 0 ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 1 ½ 1 9 4.Timman (2640) ½ 1 ½ x ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ 0 1 1 ½ ½ ½ 0 8½ 5.Tal (2565) ½ ½ ½ ½ x ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 0 ½ 1 1 ½ ½ 8½ 6.Spassky (2590) 0 1 1 0 ½ x ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 0 8 7.Beliavsky (2640) ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ x 0 ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 8 8.Smyslov (2595) ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ 1 x ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 1 7½ 9.Chernin (2560) ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ x ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 7½ 10.Portisch (2625) ½ 0 0 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ x ½ 0 1 0 ½ 1 7 11.Seirawan (2570) ½ ½ ½ 0 1 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ x 1 0 ½ ½ ½ 7 12.Short (2575) ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 0 x ½ 1 ½ ½ 7 13.Korchnoi (2630) ½ 0 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 1 ½ x ½ 1 ½ 6½ 14.Ribli (2605) 0 ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 0 ½ x 1 ½ 6½ 15.Nogueiras (2555) 0 0 ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 0 x 1 6 16.Spraggett (2550) ½ 0 0 1 ½ 1 0 0 0 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 x 5]table

    In the end Yusupov, Vaganian and Sokolov qualified for the next stage with Timman and Tal having to play-off for the final spot.

    Thanks to <TheFocus> <Tabanus> and <thomastonk> for their help to make this collection possible.


    120 games, 1985

  12. Moscow 1935
    NOTE : This collection has now been superceded by Moscow (1935)

    Ten years after the Moscow Tournament of 1925 ( See Game Collection: Moscow 1925 ) and following on from the Botvinnik - Flohr Match of 1933 (See Game Collection: Botvinnik-Flohr Match 1933 ), Nikolai Vasilyevich Krylenko , the head of Soviet Chess decided it was time to test the progress of Soviet Chess against its Western counterpart. To this end eight Foreign Masters including two former World Champions were invited to pit their skills against twelve Soviet Masters in early 1935. The tournament opened on the 14th of February and finished on the 15th of March and was held in the Museum Of Fine Arts in Moscow. The joint winners were Botvinnik and Flohr but the star of the tourney was the undefeated third place getter 66-year-old Dr Emanuel Lasker who was half a point behind them. This was to be his last great tournament performance where he again finished above his great rival Jose Capablanca who was half a point behind in fourth place. This tournament also showed that with Botvinnik in their vanguard the Soviets were well on their way to becoming a major chess power.

    -

    The following year another Moscow Tournament took place. ( See Game Collection: Moscow 1936 ).

    -

    table[
    Points Botvinnik * ½ ½ ½ 1 0 1 ½ 1 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ 0 1 ½ 1 1 13 Flohr ½ * ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 ½ ½ 13 Lasker ½ ½ * 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 1 12½ Capablanca ½ ½ 0 * ½ 1 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ 0 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 1 12 Spielmann 0 ½ ½ ½ * ½ ½ ½ 0 1 1 ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ 1 1 1 1 11 Kan 1 ½ 0 0 ½ * ½ 0 1 0 ½ ½ 1 1 0 1 1 ½ ½ 1 10½ Levenfish 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ * ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 0 1 1 1 1 ½ 0 1 10½ Lilienthal ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ * 0 ½ ½ ½ 0 1 ½ ½ 0 1 1 ½ 10 Ragozin 0 ½ ½ 0 1 0 ½ 1 * 0 0 ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 1 ½ 1 10 Romanovsky 0 0 ½ ½ 0 1 ½ ½ 1 * ½ ½ 1 0 ½ ½ 1 0 1 1 10 Alatortsev ½ ½ ½ 0 0 ½ 0 ½ 1 ½ * 0 0 1 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 1 9½ Goglidze 0 0 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 * ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 1 1 1 9½ Rabinovich ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 0 1 1 ½ 0 1 ½ * 0 0 ½ 0 ½ 1 1 9½ Riumin 0 ½ ½ 1 ½ 0 0 0 0 1 0 ½ 1 * 0 1 1 1 ½ 1 9½ Lisitsin ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ 1 0 ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ 1 1 * 0 ½ ½ ½ 1 9 Bohatirchuk 1 0 ½ ½ ½ 0 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 1 * ½ ½ 0 ½ 8 Stahlberg 0 0 ½ ½ 0 0 0 1 0 0 ½ 1 1 0 ½ ½ * ½ 1 1 8 Pirc ½ 0 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ 0 0 1 ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ * 1 1 7½ Chekhover 0 ½ 0 0 0 ½ 1 0 ½ 0 0 0 0 ½ ½ 1 0 0 * 1 5½ Menchik 0 ½ 0 0 0 0 0 ½ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ½ 0 0 0 * 1½]table

    -

    Allocation Of Prizes

    - Foreign Players

    Flohr 400 dollars
    Lasker 250 dollars
    Capablanca 150 dollars
    Spielmann 100 dollars
    Lilienthal 1000 roubles

    - Soviet Players

    Botvinnik 5000 roubles
    Levenfish 2250 roubles
    Kan 2250 roubles
    Ragozin 1000 roubles
    Romanovsky 1000 roubles

    - Special Izvestiya Prizes

    Ragozin - best result against Foreign masters (6 out of 8)

    Flohr - best result against Soviet masters (8½ out of 12)

    Capablanca - best result against Soviet masters (8½ out of 12)

    As a result of finishing joint first The All-Union Committee for Physical Culture awarded the title of grandmaster to Mikhail Botvinnik. He also received a car from The People's Commissariat Of Heavy Industry.

    Best Games of the Tournament.

    =1st Lasker for his game against Capablanca
    =1st Botvinnik for his game against Riumin

    3rd Spielmann for his game against Chekhover

    =4th Riumin for his game against Rabinovich
    =4th Ragozin for his game against Lilienthal

    =6th Capablanca for his game against Ragozin
    =6th Levenfish for his game against Bohatirchuk.

    -

    190 games, 1935

  13. Netway Masters Tt 1992
    NOTE : This collection has now been superceded by Netway Masters (1992)

    The Netway Masters tournament of 1992 was organized as an appreciation of Australian invitations that had been extended to New Zealand players in recent Sydney tournaments. It was also a chance for young players to gain IM norms.

    Sponsorship was arranged with the Auckland Company Netway Communications and invitations were sent to Lembit Antsovich Oll and Anthony Miles with the rest of the twelve player field made up of Australian and New Zealand players. This made the tournament a Category V event where seven points from eleven games were needed to gain an IM norm.

    The tournament was not without incident. At the opening reception Lembit Oll was unwell and wanted to play out his games on a short time control. Other players disagreed with this proposal and Oll therefore withdrew from the tournament. With Oll's withdrawl it looked like the tournament would collapse but Ian Rogers cut short his holiday in the Australian Outback, stepped into the breach and saved the day. Ortvin Sarapu who was Oll's host for two weeks was very upset with the situation and it showed in his play. On the positive side Benjamin Martin played very well and obtained an IM norm of seven points with three rounds to spare. The two Grandmasters Miles and Rogers showed their class and finished in joint first place.

    The tournament ran from the 31st of March to the 12th of April and was held in Durham House, Finance Plaza in Albert Street in Auckland, New Zealand. The Auckland Chess Association team responsible for running the tournament included Co-ordinator : Paul Stanley Spiller Funding : Ewen McGowen Green Tournament Arbiter : Robert Gibbons Committee : Ortvin Sarapu, Martin Paul Dreyer and J Nigel Metge.

    The playing sessions were six hours long begining at 1pm and finishing at 7pm. Adjournments went for a further two hour playing session. The time control was 40 moves per hour and 20 moves per half hour thereafter.

    -

    Crosstable :

    table[
    Pts
    1.Miles * ½ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ½ 1 10
    2.Rogers ½ * 1 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 10
    3.Martin 0 0 * ½ 1 1 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 8
    4.Levi 0 0 ½ * 1 1 0 ½ ½ 0 1 1 5½
    5.Garbett 0 ½ 0 0 * ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 5
    6.Sarfati 0 0 0 0 ½ * 1 1 1 1 ½ 0 5
    7.Small 0 0 0 1 ½ 0 * ½ ½ 1 1 ½ 5
    8.Noble 0 0 ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ * ½ 1 ½ ½ 4½
    9.Sarapu 0 0 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ * 0 ½ 1 3½
    10.Wallace 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 * ½ 1 3½
    11.Dreyer ½ 0 0 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ * 0 3
    12.Metge 0 0 0 0 0 1 ½ ½ 0 0 1 * 3 ]table

    -

    The Netway Masters 1992 Trophy was presented to Tony Miles on tie-break.

    -

    Prizes in New Zealand dollars were :

    1st $1500
    2nd $ 750
    3rd $ 400
    4th $ 200
    5th $ 150

    -


    66 games, 1992

  14. New York 1924
    NOTE : This collection has now been superceded by New York (1924)

    In December 1923 following an aborted attempt to arrange a World Championship match between Capablanca and Alyekhin, Herman Helms, publisher of the American Chess Bulletin, Harry Latz the General Manager of the Hotel Alamac in New York and Norbert Lederer the Secetary of the Manhattan Chess Club set about organizing a tournament to rival Cambridge Springs 1904. The tournament took place in the Hotel Alamac from the 16th of March to the 18th of April 1924. The participants were Dr Emanuel Lasker, Capablanca, Alyekhin, Marshall, Janowski, Maroczy, Bogolyubov, Reti, Tartakover, Edward Lasker and Yates. The time limit was 30 moves in 2 hours and 15 moves per hour thereafter. Capablanca was expected to be the winner but the 55-year-old Dr Lasker proved that he was by no means a spent force and ran away with the tournament. In a number of ways the tournament paralleled the St. Petersburg 1914 Tournament with the top three place getters ten years older. It was also notable for Reti's use of his own Opening, Capablanca's first tournament loss in eight years and a number of masterpieces that were created.

    -

    Crosstable :

    table[
    Pts 1.Em Lasker * * ½ 0 1 ½ ½ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 1 1 16 2.Capablanca ½ 1 * * ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 1 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 14½ 3.Alyekhin 0 ½ ½ ½ * * ½ ½ 1 0 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 ½ ½ 1 1 12 4.Marshall ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ * * ½ 1 0 ½ 0 1 ½ 0 ½ 1 1 ½ 1 1 11 5.Reti 0 0 1 0 0 1 ½ 0 * * ½ ½ 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 10½ 6.Maroczy 0 0 ½ 0 0 ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ * * 0 1 ½ ½ 1 1 ½ 1 1 0 10 7.Bogolyubov 0 0 0 0 ½ ½ 1 0 1 0 1 0 * * 0 1 1 1 ½ 1 1 0 9½ 8.Tartakover ½ 0 0 0 ½ ½ ½ 1 0 0 ½ ½ 1 0 * * 1 0 ½ 0 ½ 1 8 9.Yates ½ 0 0 ½ 0 0 ½ 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 * * 1 1 ½ 1 7 10.Ed Lasker ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ 0 1 ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ 1 0 0 * * 0 ½ 6½ 11.Janowski 0 0 ½ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 ½ 0 ½ 0 1 ½ * * 5 ]table

    -

    Prizes :

    1st $1500
    2nd $1000
    3rd $750
    4th $500
    5th $250

    Brilliancy Prizes :

    A silver cup and $75 in gold went to Reti for his win over Bogolyubov in Round 12.

    $50 to Marshall for his win over Bogolyubov in Round 18.

    $25 to Capablanca for his win over Lasker in Round 14.

    -

    110 games, 1924

  15. New York 1927
    NOTE : This collection has now been superceded by New York (1927)

    Following the success of the tournament they organized in 1924 Norbert Lederer and his associates decided to hold a match tournament of six or seven masters where each player would meet the other competitors four times. Maroczy was asked to be the tournament director and invitations were sent to Capablanca, Lasker, Marshall, Alyekhin, Bogolyubov, Niemzowitsch and Vidmar. Capablanca was the only player who would get an appearance fee.

    However, due to an incident in one of his games with Capablanca in the 1924 event Lasker was involved in a bitter and public dispute with Capablanca and some members of the organising committee. He didn't reply to his invitation and his place was offered to Spielmann. Spielmann immediately accepted his invitation.

    Bogolyubov wrote back asking for an appearance fee of $1,500 and that the tournament should be replaced by a World Championship match between himself and Capablanca. His conditions were given in the form of an ultimatum which the committee couldn't accept and they also decided that his place wouldn't be offered to anyone else so the number of players was now reduced.

    A number of accounts stated that the tourney would be regarded as a qualifier for choosing the challenger for the World Championship. When Alyekhin heard about this he was furious as he and Capablanca had already arranged terms for their forthcoming match in September that year. Alyekhin wouldn't take part unless he was given an assurance the tournament wouldn't affect the conditions that had been agreed previously. The committee with Capablanca's agreement duly telegraphed this assurance and Alyekhin then confirmed his acceptance of the invitation.

    Taking place from the 19th of February to the 23rd of March 1927 the tournament had a time control of 40 moves in 2½ hours rather than the then standard of 30 moves in 2 hours and was held in the Trade Banquet Hall of the Hotel Manhattan Square on 77th street, New York.

    Five rounds a week were played in the early part of the tourney but this was later relaxed with the introduction of more rest days to ease the strain on the players.

    Capablanca registered one of the greatest triumphs of his career taking first place without the loss of a single game.

    -

    table[
    C A N V S M 1.Capablanca * * * * 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 1 ½ 1 2.Alyekhin 0 ½ ½ ½ * * * * ½ 0 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 3.Niemzowitsch 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 0 ½ * * * * 1 0 0 ½ 1 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 4.Vidmar ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 1 1 ½ * * * * ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 1 ½ 5.Spielmann ½ ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ 0 0 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ * * * * ½ ½ 1 ½ 6.Marshall 0 0 ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ 0 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ 1 0 ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ * * * *]table

    -

    Allocation of Prizes :

    1st $2000
    2nd $1500
    3rd $1000

    Brilliancy Prizes :

    First brilliancy prize of $125 to Capablanca for his 13th round win against Spielmann.

    Second brilliancy prize of $100 to Alyekhin for his win over Marshall in the 18th round.

    Third brilliancy prize of $75 to Niemzowitsch for his win over Marshall in the 17th round.

    Fourth brilliancy prize of $50 to Vidmar for his win against Niemzowitsch in the 14th round.

    Capablanca also won a special prize for his win against Niemzowitsch in the 15th round.

    -

    Non prize winners received $50 for each point scored.

    -

    60 games, 1927

  16. Nikolai Ryumin
    Published by The Chess Player in 2001.

    ISBN 1 901034 45 8

    Number 15 in the Chess Master Series is a small book by Aidan Woodger that is devoted to Soviet Masters Nikolai Ryumin and Sergey Belavenyets. Apparently the only game these two masters played against each other was Riumin vs S Belavenets, 1934 The collection complier has elected to break the work down into two separate parts, one to each player.

    -

    -

    The other part can be accessed at Game Collection: Sergey Belavenyets

    -

    35 games, 1931-1938

  17. Nuremberg 1896
    NOTE : This tournament has now been superceded by Nuremberg (1896)

    The tournament held in Nuremberg ( also known as Nürnberg or Nuernberg ) was organized by the Nuremberg Chess Club and scheduled to coincide with a large industrial exhibition of the city. It was one of the last great tournaments of the 19th Century. Held in the premises of the Museum Society in Nuremberg it ran from the 19th of July to the 9th of August. The time limit was 30 moves in two hours. The tournament featured not only established players such as Schallopp, Winawer and Blackburne but also young up-coming talents like Schlechter, Maroczy, Janowski and Charousek. It also brought together the current World Champion Lasker, his immediate predecessor Steinitz and their main rivals Chigorin, Pillsbury and Tarrasch. A number of masterpieces and well fought games resulted.

    Crosstable :

    table[

    1.Lasker * ½ 0 1 0 1 ½ ½ 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2.Maroczy ½ * 1 ½ 1 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 1 ½ 3.Pillsbury 1 0 * 1 ½ 1 ½ 0 0 1 0 ½ 1 1 1 ½ 1 1 1 4.Tarrasch 0 ½ 0 * 1 1 ½ ½ 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 5.Janowski 1 0 ½ 0 * 1 1 1 1 0 ½ 0 1 ½ 1 1 0 1 1 6.Steinitz 0 1 0 0 0 * 1 ½ ½ 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 7.Schlechter ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 0 * ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 1 ½ ½ 1 1 8.Walbrodt ½ ½ 1 ½ 0 ½ ½ * ½ 1 0 0 ½ 1 1 1 1 1 0 9.Schiffers 0 ½ 1 0 0 ½ ½ ½ * ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 1 1 10.Chigorin 0 ½ 0 0 1 0 0 0 ½ * 1 1 ½ 1 1 1 0 1 1 11.Blackburne 0 ½ 1 1 ½ 0 ½ 1 1 0 * 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 ½ 12.Charousek 1 0 ½ 0 1 0 ½ 1 ½ 0 1 * ½ 0 ½ 1 1 0 0 13.Marco 0 ½ 0 0 0 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ * ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ 14.Albin 0 0 0 0 ½ 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 ½ * 0 ½ ½ 1 1 15.Winawer 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 ½ 0 0 ½ 0 1 * 1 1 1 ½ 16.Porges 0 0 ½ ½ 0 0 ½ 0 ½ 0 1 0 ½ ½ 0 * ½ 0 1 17.Showalter 0 0 0 ½ 1 0 ½ 0 0 1 0 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ * 0 1 18.Schallopp 0 0 0 ½ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 * 1 19.Teichmann 0 ½ 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 ½ 1 ½ 0 ½ 0 0 0 * ]table

    The Final Banquet and Prize Giving was held on Tuesday the 11th of August.

    First Prize : Lasker 3,000 marks

    Second Prize : Maroczy 2,000 marks

    Third Prize : Tarrasch and Pillsbury 1,500 marks (750 marks each)

    Fourth Prize : Tarrasch and Pillsbury 1,000 marks (500 marks each)

    Fifth Prize : Janowski 600 marks

    Sixth Prize : Steinitz 300 marks

    Seventh Prize : Walbrodt and Schlechter 200 marks (100 marks each)

    A brilliancy prize of 300 marks was given to Pillsbury for his victory over Lasker.

    A special prize of 100 marks was awarded to Blackburne for the best score of a non-prize winner against the prize winners.

    -

    171 games, 1896

  18. Plaza International Chess Tt 1988
    NOTE : This collection has now been superceded by Plaza (1988)

    As part of the New Zealand International Festival of the Arts and to mark the opening of the Plaza International Hotel in Wellington, New Zealand this International tournament was organized by Alan Grant Kerr.

    Six overseas players, Boris Spassky, Robert Huebner, Ian Rogers, Eduard Gufeld, Zsuzsa Polgar and Larry Mark Christiansen were invited to pit their skills against New Zealand players Murray Chandler, Ortvin Sarapu, Jonathan D Sarfati, Vernon Albert Small, Russell John Dive and Anthony F Ker.

    The tournament took place in the Plaza International Hotel from the 15th to the 28th of March. The Director Of Play was Robert Gibbons. All rounds were scheduled to take place daily from 1:30pm to 7:30pm except Round 11 which started an hour earlier. Admission fee for spectators was ten dollars per day.

    -

    Crosstable :

    table[

    Pts
    1.Spassky * ½ 1 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 1 ½ - 7½
    2.Chandler ½ * ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 1 1 1 - 7½
    3.Gufeld 0 ½ * ½ ½ 1 1 1 1 1 1 - 7½
    4.Polgar 0 ½ ½ * 1 0 1 ½ 1 1 1 - 6½
    5.Rogers ½ ½ ½ 0 * 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 6½
    6.Christiansen 0 ½ 0 1 1 * ½ ½ ½ 1 1 - 6
    7.Sarfati ½ 0 0 0 0 ½ * ½ ½ 1 1 - 4
    8.Sarapu ½ 0 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ * ½ 0 ½ - 3
    9.Small 0 0 0 0 0 ½ ½ ½ * ½ 1 - 3
    10.Dive 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 ½ * ½ - 2
    11.Ker ½ 0 0 0 0 0 0 ½ 0 ½ * - 1½
    * Huebner - - - - 0 - - - - - - ]table

    * Robert Huebner withdrew with illness after his first round game with Ian Rogers. Rogers score does not include this win.

    -

    Game Of The Round prizes were awarded to :

    Round 1 - Rogers for his win over Huebner

    Round 2 - Spassky for his win over Polgar

    Round 3 - Spassky for his win over Dive

    Round 4 - Christiansen and Sarfati for their draw

    Round 5 - Rogers for his win over Small

    Round 6 - Christiansen for his win over Dive

    Round 7 - Spassky for his win over Christiansen

    Round 8 - Ker and Spassky for their draw

    Round 9 - Spassky for his win over Gufeld

    Round 10 - Chandler and Dive jointly

    Round 11 - Christiansen for his win over Ker
    and - Rogers for his win over Sarapu.

    -

    56 games, 1988

  19. Ratmir Kholmov Additional Games
    User: Resignation Trap has compiled two splendid collections of games by Soviet Grandmaster Ratmir Kholmov ( See Game Collection: Ratmir Kholmov - Selected Games 1945-1957 and Game Collection: Cool Moves by Kholmov ) However, the games that feature here do not appear in either of these collections.
    8 games, 1953-1966

  20. Schachmeisterpartien 1960 - 1965

    A book edited by Rudolf Teschner and published by Philipp Reclam Jun. ISBN 3-15-008997-2.

    75 games, 1960-1965

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