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Benzol
Chess Game Collections
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  1. Second Piatigorsky Cup 1966
    NOTE : This collection has now been superceded by Second Piatigorsky Cup (1966)

    The collection is based on <matey>'s Game Collection: Second Piatigorsky Cup 1966

    However, a number of omissions and errors in that collection meant that it was unsuitable directly for conversion to an historic tournament, hence this collection.

    I would like to thank <matey> for his original contribution in getting the ball rolling on the project.

    table[
    1. Spassky * * 1 1 1 1 1 2. Fischer 0 * * 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 3. Larsen 0 1 0 * * 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 4. Portisch 0 0 * * 1 1 1 5. Unzicker 0 1 * * 1 6. Petrosian 0 0 0 * * 1 1 1 7. Reshevsky 0 0 * * 1 1 8. Najdorf 1 0 0 0 0 0 * * 1 1 9. Ivkov 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 * * 1 10. Donner 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 * *]table

    90 games, 1966

  2. Sergey Belavenyets
    Published by The Chess Player in 2001.

    ISBN 1 901034 45 8

    Number 15 in the Chess Master Series is a small book by Aidan Woodger that is devoted to Soviet Masters Sergey Belavenyets and Nikolai Ryumin. Apparently the only game these two masters played against each other was Riumin vs S Belavenets, 1934 The collection complier has elected to break the work down into two separate parts, one to each player.

    -

    The other part can be accessed at Game Collection: Nikolai Ryumin

    -


    35 games, 1929-1939

  3. St Petersburg 1914
    NOTE : This collection has now been superceded by St. Petersburg (1914)

    The St Petersburg Tournament of 1914 featured the joint winners of the 1914 All Russian Championship and players who had won at least one major tournament. There were the veterans Blackburne and Gunsberg, established masters such as Tarrasch, Bernstein, Janowski, Niemzowitsch, Alyekhin and Marshall as well as the World Champion Lasker and his two most prominent rivals Rubinstein and Capablanca.

    The tournament was divided into two sections. The first stage from the 21st April to the 6th of May was an all-play-all event with the first five finishers proceeding into the second stage which ran from the 10th of May to the 22nd of May. This second stage was a double round all-play-all with the final scores being cumulative from both sections.

    It was expected that there would be a great struggle between Lasker, Capablanca and Rubinstein but disappointingly Rubinstein failed to make the final leaving Lasker and Capablanca to battle it out. Lasker was 1 points behind the Cuban at the start of the finals but in the end ran out the winner by a point by scoring a truly magnificent 7 out of 8.

    table[

    Preliminary Crosstable :

    Pts
    1.Capablanca * 1 1 1 1 1 1 8
    2.Lasker * 0 1 1 1 1 6
    3.Tarrasch * 1 1 1 0 1 6
    4.Alyekhin 0 * 1 1 1 6
    5.Marshall 0 * 1 1 1 6
    6.Bernstein 0 1 0 0 * 1 1 5
    7.Rubinstein 0 0 * 1 1 5
    8.Niemzowitsch 0 0 * 0 1 4
    9.Blackburne 0 0 0 0 1 * 0 1 3
    10.Janowski 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 * 3
    11.Gunsberg 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 * 1 ]table

    -

    table[

    Final Crosstable :

    Pts 1.Lasker 6 * * 1 1 1 1 1 1 13 2.Capablanca 8 0 * * 1 1 0 1 1 13 3.Alyekhin 6 0 0 0 * * 1 1 1 10 4.Tarrasch 6 0 0 1 0 0 * * 0 8 5.Marshall 6 0 0 0 0 0 1 * * 8]table

    Prizes amounted to 1200, 800, 500 and 300 Roubles.

    Each non-prizewinner received 20 Roubles for every game won and 10 Roubles for every drawn game.


    75 games, 1914

  4. The Application of Chess Theory
    Published by Pergamon Press

    ISBN 0-08-026914-1 (Hardcover)

    ISBN 0-08-029738-2 (Flexicover)

    Efim Geller was one of the World's leading Grandmasters for over three decades. This collection of one hundred of his best games appeared in 1984.

    However, before the games first a few words 'From the Author'.

    "The games in this book were played during the 35 years of my career in big-time chess. Do I number them among my best? In the main, yes, because victory in them brought me that which attracts me more than anything in chess. Defeats are also instructive, of course, but that is a quite different topic... The games are grouped in a rather unusual way - according to opening. This is not by accident. All my life I have been working on the problems of chess theory, and to a certain extent such a grouping enables the book to be regarded as a "report on the work carried out". But the main thing is that, by playing through a whole group of games played, for example, with the Sicilian Defence, I think that simultaneously the reader will be able to master a whole series of stratagems, typical of the given opening. In a separate section are games played by the author against grandmasters with the highest title - that of World Champion. Not every game here is a contender for the epithet of "best", but all, without exception are memorable. But then, there is no way that battles with the chess kings could be otherwise...."


    100 games, 1946-1982

  5. The Big Three ??
    There is a rumour on this site that David Moody, Peter Fontaine and Paul Morten can be regarded like Stalin, Roosevelt and Churchill - the big three. These games show the fallacy of the rumour and much as Messrs Moody, Fontaine and Morten would love not to have feet of clay and be able to leap buildings in a single bound these games show that such isn't the case. -

    To avoid a breach with my friends I offer apologies to Peter and David who are actually quite good players. - :)

    6 games, 1975-2007

  6. The Exchange Sacrifice
    This is a collection of games mainly by Botvinnik, Petrosian and Gligoric which involve the exchange sacrifice. The sacifices are made to upset the normal values and flow of events that transpire over the board. This collection was inspired by Ray Keene & Ewen Green.
    101 games, 1925-2007

  7. The Magic Of Mikhail Tal
    This collection is based on Joe Gallagher's book which was published by Everyman Publishers plc in 2000. ISBN 1 85744 266 0.
    34 games, 1975-1992

  8. USSR Championship 1983
    NOTE : This collection has now been superceded by 50th USSR Championship (1983)

    There was no USSR Championship held in 1982 so a special effort was made to make the 50th event held in Moscow from the 2nd to the 28th of April 1983 a representative contest. This tournament was considered to be the strongest held since the 41st Championship of 1973 (See Game Collection: USSR Championship 1973). Kasparov and Smyslov were absent but Karpov was playing in his first final since his victory in 1976 (See Game Collection: USSR Championship 1976). Lerner, Azmaiparashvili, Malaniuk, and Razuvaev were the qualifying winners of the four Otborochny tournaments. Agzamov and Vaganian were promoted to the final as the winners of the 18-player First League which had been held at Telavi, Georgia in December 1982. The field began with the odd number of seventeen players but Tal fell ill with dangerously high blood pressure and was forced to withdraw after the ninth round. In the latter rounds two players had byes.

    -

    Crosstable :

    table[
    Pts 1.Karpov * 1 0 1 1 1 1 9 2.Tukmakov * 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 9 3.Polugaevsky * 0 0 1 1 1 1 8 4.Vaganian 0 * 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 8 5.Balashov 1 * 0 0 1 0 1 1 8 6.Malaniuk 0 1 1 * 0 0 1 1 0 7 7.Petrosian 1 * 0 1 0 7 8.Psakhis 0 1 1 * 0 0 1 7 9.Romanishin 0 0 0 1 1 1 * 1 0 0 1 7 10.Agzamov 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 * 1 0 7 11.Azmaiparashvili 1 0 1 0 0 * 7 12.Beliavsky 0 0 0 0 * 1 1 1 7 13.Razuvaev 0 1 1 * 0 0 7 14.Geller 0 1 0 0 0 * 1 6 15.Yusupov 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 * 6 16.Lerner 0 0 0 0 0 1 * 5 17.Tal ** - X - - - - - - - - 0 - 0 1 ]table

    -

    ** Due to illness Tal only played six games with losses to Geller and Lerner and draws with Petrosian, Vaganian and Razuvaev. His Round 8 game with Tukmakov was adjourned after 40 moves and wasn't resumed. It was subsequently annulled with no result. On medical advice he withdrew from the tournament.

    -

    126 games, 1983

  9. USSR vs. Rest of the World
    NOTE : This collection has now been superceded by USSR vs. Rest of the World (1984)

    This collection based on Game Collection: USSR v Rest of the World, Match London 1984 by User: capybara contains all the games played in this match.

    -

    Participants in the USSR team in board order were : Anatoly Karpov, Garry Kasparov, Lev Polugaevsky, Vasily Smyslov, Rafael Vaganian, Alexander G Beliavsky, Mikhail Tal, Yuri S Razuvaev, Artur Yusupov, Andrei Sokolov with Vladimir B Tukmakov and Oleg M Romanishin as alternate reserves.

    -

    Participants in the Rest of the World team in board order were : Ulf Andersson, Jan Timman, Viktor Korchnoi, Ljubomir Ljubojevic, Zoltan Ribli, Yasser Seirawan, John Nunn, Robert Huebner, Anthony Miles, Eugenio Torre with Murray G Chandler and Bent Larsen as alternate reserves.

    -

    -

    table[ Karpov 1 Andersson 0 Kasparov 1 Timman 0 Polugaevsky 0 - Korchnoi 1 - Tukmakov - - - - - - Smyslov 0 - - Ljubojevic 1 - - Tukmakov - 1 - - 0 - Vaganian 0 Ribli 1 Beliavsky 1 1 - - Seirawan 0 0 - - - - 1 Larsen - - 0 Tal - 1 - Nunn - 0 - Romanishin - - - - - - Tal - - - Chandler - - - Razuvaev Huebner Yusupov - Miles - Romanishin - - - 0 - - - Sokolov 0 1 - 0 Torre 1 0 - 1 Romanishin - - - Chandler - - -]table

    -

    USSR 5, 6, 5, 4, 21;
    WORLD 5, 4, 4, 5, 19.

    -

    40 games, 1984

  10. USSR Absolute Championship 1941
    NOTE : This collection has now been superceded by USSR Absolute Championship (1941)

    Taking place in the cities of Leningrad and Moscow the winner of this Match-Tournament was going to be the challenger for Alyekhin's World Title. The USSR Absolute Championship of 1941 was brought about by the results of the 12th USSR Championship in 1940 (See Game Collection: USSR Championship 1940). Following the Russo-Germany Non Aggression Pact of August 1939 the Soviet Union annexed the Baltic States of Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia as well as the eastern parts of Poland. This meant that players like Keres, Petrov and Mikenas were eligible to play in the 12th Soviet Championship. As Andre Lilienthal had also been granted Soviet citizenship he too was eligible to compete.

    The hall in which the 12th Championship was held had excellent acoustics so the players suffered with noise from the audience. Botvinnik who was actually leading after nine rounds felt his performance was being affected by these conditions and he ended up in shared fifth and sixth places with Boleslavsky behind Bondarevsky and Lilienthal who were joint first, Smyslov third and Keres fourth.

    After receiving a letter from Botvinnik and working behind the scenes chess organiser (and keen Botvinnik supporter) Vladimir Nikolayevich Snegiryov persuaded the authorities that a Match-Tournament of the first six place-getters would be a fairer determination of the Champion (and hence Challenger for Alyekhin), rather than the proposed winner of the Bondarevsky-Lilienthal Match play-off.

    So the Match-Tournament was a twenty round affair with the first ten rounds held in the Tauride Palace in Leningrad and last ten rounds played in the Hall Of Columns in Moscow. It started on the 23rd of March and ran until the 29th of April. Botvinnik ran out the convincing winner.

    -

    table[
    1.Botvinnik * * * * 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 2.Keres 0 * * * * 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 3.Smyslov 0 0 0 0 1 * * * * 1 1 1 4.Boleslavsky 0 0 1 0 0 * * * * 1 1 1 0 0 5.Lilienthal 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 * * * * 1 1 1 6.Bondarevsky 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 * * * * ]table

    -

    Two months after this tournament in "Operation Barbarossa" Nazi Germany attacked the Soviet Union and so the quest for a Soviet player to win the World Title receded into the background until after the War.

    -

    60 games, 1941

  11. Vladimir Simagin
    Published by The Chess Player in 2000

    ISBN 1 901034 26 4

    This small book by author Aidan Woodger is number 12 in the Chess Master series and is devoted to Soviet Grandmaster Vladimir Simagin ( 1919 - 1968 ). It features full gamescores and positions spanning his entire career.

    -

    8. Game Ending

    White : Simagin

    Black : Zagoryansky

    (Exhibition Tournament Ivanovo, 1944)

    White to play


    click for larger view

    34.g5 hxg5 35.Rh7+ Kf8 36.Rfh1 Ke8 37.Rg7 Rf7 38.Rh8+ Kd7 39.Bc6+ Ke6 40.Rh6+ Rf6 41.Bd7+ Kxd7 42.Rxf6 Re8 43.Rxg5 Ng8 44.Rg7+ Ne7 45.Kg3 Rh8 46.Rff7 Re8 47.Kg4 Kd8 48.Kg5 a6 49.a4 a5 50.Kf6 Ng8+ 51.Kg6 Ne7+ 52.Kg5 Ng8 53.Rd7+ Kc8 54.Rc7+ Kb8 55.Rb7+ 1-0

    -

    14.Game Ending

    White : Simagin

    Black : Bronstein

    (Match - Tournament, Moscow Ch 1947)

    Black to play


    click for larger view

    1...h4 2.Qxd6 Qg2+ 3.Kb3 h3 4.Qd7+ Kg8 5.f5 h2 6.Bg5 h1=Q 7.Qe8+ Kg7 8.Qg6+ Kf8 9.Qxf6+ Kg8 10.Qd8+ Kg7 11.Qe7+ Kg8 12.Qe8+ 1-0

    -

    74 games, 1936-1968

  12. WCC Index [ Steinitz - Bird 1866 ]
    17 games, 1866

  13. WCC Index [ Korchnoi - Reshevsky 1968 ]
    8 games, 1968

  14. WCC Index [ Morphy - Anderssen 1858 ]
    NOTE : This collection has now been superceded by Anderssen - Morphy (1858)
    11 games, 1858

  15. WCC Index [ Morphy - Harrwitz 1858 ]
    8 games, 1858

  16. WCC Index [ Morphy - Loewenthal 1858 ]
    14 games, 1858

  17. WCC Index [ Morphy - Mongredien 1859 ]
    8 games, 1859

  18. WCC Index [ Steinitz - Blackburne 1876 ]
    NOTE : This collection has now been superceded by Steinitz - Blackburne (1876)
    7 games, 1876

  19. WCC Index [ Steinitz - Zukertort 1872 ]
    6th August to 5th September 1872

    NOTE : This collection has now been superceded by Steinitz - Zukertort (1872)

    12 games, 1872

  20. WCC Index [Anderssen - Steinitz 1866]
    This collection has now been superceded by Anderssen - Steinitz (1866)
    14 games, 1866

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