chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

 
 

Premium Chessgames Member
nakul1964
Chess Game Collections
[what is this?] --*-- [what is this?]

<< previous | page 3 of 10 | next >>

  1. Beat the Elite with Black
    Proof that anything can happen and often does. In descending order from largest Elo-point differential. (Mostly classical chess. All games played since 2000. Loser has an Elo rating of 2600 or better at the time of the game.) 
    99 games, 2000-2016

  2. Beating the Caro-Kann (Kotronias)
    Games from the above book.
    16 games, 1927-1992

  3. Beating the Caro-Kann (Kotronias)
    Games from the above book.
    16 games, 1927-1992

  4. Beating the Caro-Kann (Kotronias)
    Games from the above book.
    16 games, 1927-1992

  5. Benoni 2001-2006, players 2650 and above
    I compiled all the games from 2001-2006 that have the same position we have after 3.Nf3
    27 games, 2001-2006

  6. Black plays 1...d6
    These games show an interesting, relatively rare, Black response to 1.d4. These games feature many early Queen exchanges, all initiated by White. Amazingly, this exchange favors Black. This anomaly is what first attracted me to this opening. The Black King is safe in the center with the Queens off the board. Since both players are out of book almost immediately, this opening is a true test of chess skill. Almost all of these games reach an exciting endgame.
    57 games, 1953-2018

  7. Bobby Fischer Rediscovered (Andy Soltis)
    Games featured in the above book.
    97 games, 1956-1992

  8. Bobby Fischer Teaches Chess
    By Bobby Fischer, Stuart Margulies, Ph.D. and Donn Mosenfelder (Bantam Books, 1972). This is an interesting little book for beginners. It is mostly comprised of checkmate puzzles. Eighteen of the puzzles in the book are taken from (or based on) positions in certain of Fischer's games. Those games are listed here.
    18 games, 1957-1965

  9. Botvinnik "100 Selected Games"
    Dover publisher
    87 games, 1926-1946

  10. Botvinnik "100 Selected Games"
    Dover publisher
    87 games, 1926-1946

  11. Botvinnik's Best Games 1947-1970
    David McKay publisher
    100 games, 1947-1967

  12. C05 French: Tarrasch [White]
    105 games, 2003-2013

  13. C18 French: Winawer [Black]
    French Defense [Winawer: Advance Variation]
    49 games, 2008-2013

  14. C18 French: Winawer [Black]
    French Defense [Winawer: Advance Variation]
    49 games, 2008-2013

  15. C18 French: Winawer [White]
    French Defense [Winawer]
    75 games, 2008-2012

  16. C18 French: Winawer [White]
    French Defense [Winawer]
    75 games, 2008-2012

  17. C53 games with e4 - most common games
    10 games, 1570-1911

  18. C89 Spanish: Marshall Attack [White]
    79 games, 1989-2012

  19. C89 Spanish: Marshall Attack [White]
    79 games, 1989-2012

  20. Capablanca's Best Chess Endings
    Games from Irving Chernev's "Capablanca's Best Chess Endings"

    The opening of a game is important - and hundreds of books are written on the opening. The opening leads to the midgame. The midgame is important - and hundreds of books are written on the midgame. The midgame leads to the endgame. The endgame is important - and *no books are written on the endgame*!

    Yes, there are books, but they concern themselves with composed endings, or with theoretical (and for the most part artificial) positions. The composed endings are admittedly beautiful, but they are of limited value, as they have no relationship to practical play. Of the theoretical positions, many have their uses, but one must sift the wheat from the chaff. TO what use can we put such knowledge as the procedure for mating with a Knight and Bishop, or with the two Bishops, when an opportunity to do so may not occur in a lifetime? And why burden our minds with the manner of forcing mate with three knights (believe-it-or-not) or winning with four minor pieces against a Queen (sans Pans) when such positions as these have never yet been seen on land or sea? Capablanca himself says : "In order to improve your game, you must study the endgame before anything else; for whereas the endings can be studied and mastered by themselves, the middlegame and the opening must be studied in relation to the endgame." There are no books on endings from real life, no books from the practices of masters in actual play, let alone from the practice of a single master. This fact alone is enough to justify this book of endings, selected from the tournament and match play of the greatest endgame virtuoso the world has ever seen - the immortal Capablanca. Here are wondrous endings to enchant the reader, endings of breathtaking artistry. Here are endings of astonishing accuracy, whose relentless logic will inspire the earnest student to emulate a similar technique - the technique of seeking a clear-cut, efficient win, instead of a display of fireworks. The games are given in full, in order to show how a slight advantage acquired in the early stages, is carried forward and exploited in the endgame. I have annotated the endings in detail (a consideration they have rarely received before) for the better appreciation of the fine points of Capablanca's play, and have given credit to those who have anticipated my findings.

    -- Irving Chernev

    60 games, 1901-1936

<< previous | page 3 of 10 | next >>

SEARCH ENTIRE GAME COLLECTION DATABASE
use these two forms to locate other game collections in the database

Search by Keyword:

EXAMPLE: Search for "FISCHER" or "HASTINGS".
Search by Username:


NOTE: You must type their screen-name exactly.


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | contact us


Copyright 2001-2019, Chessgames Services LLC