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  1. Blockade
    M Feigin vs M Monticelli, 1936 Position after 16 ♗a3-d6


    click for larger view

    GM Neil McDonald calls this position a "gruesome example of a blockade".

    2 games, 1936-1995

  2. Blockade on color complex stop pawns advancing
    This idea is best illustrated in the bishops of opposite colored endgame but the games below show that this same idea can be applied in the middlegame.

    Note in particular Svidler's amazingly brilliant game against Mamedyarov (Mamedyarov vs Svidler, 2007) in which Svidler prevents a pawn storm in an opposite-side castling(!) middlegame using this technique.

    2 games, 1962-2007

  3. BLOCKADE THAT PASSED PAWN!
    1 game, 2013

  4. BLOCKADERS DO *NOT* PROTECT SQUARES! BDNPS!
    If you are <BLOCKADING> a pawn, then you are not performing any other task. In particular, if you are <BLOCKADING> a pawn, then you are not also <CONTROLLING> (attacking/defending) a <SQUARE>.

    <BLOCKADERS> against:

    1) <PAWN FORKS> or <PAWN TRAPS> 2) <DISCOVERED ATTACKS> 3) <HALF-PASSED PAWNS> becoming fully passed pawns

    65 games, 1909-2014

  5. Blocking a line is a full-time job
    A single piece cannot <BLOCK> a line and also <DEFEND> a square.
    47 games, 1620-2009

  6. BLOCKING COMBINATIONS: OBSTRUCTING SQUARE/LINE
    Game Collection: BLOCKING COMBINATIONS: OBSTRUCTING SQUARE/LINE

    25 e5-e6!
    40 Nf6-d7+!!
    40 ... b4-b3+!
    33 ... d3-d2+!
    33 h4-h5+!

    ---

    <Dr. K. Bayer, The Immortal Problem (Era 1856)>

    Mate in 9 moves. White to begin

    <1. Rb7! Qxb7 2. Bxg6+! Kxg6 3. Qg8+ Kxf5 4. Qg4+ Ke5 5. Qh5+ Rf5 6. f4+! Bxf4
    7. Qxe2+!! Bxe2 <<<8. Re4+!! dxe4 9. d4#!!>>>>

    http://www.blub.net/~vincent/proble...

    ---

    <EPHIPHANY>

    My first <BLOCKING COMBINATION>!

    33 ... ?


    click for larger view

    33 ... d3-d2+! <block: d2>


    click for larger view

    34 ♘c4xd2 ♖a2-a1+


    click for larger view

    <CHESS IS *NOT* JUST COUNTING!>

    <MISPLACED PIECES: ALIGNED, TRAPPED, EMBARRASSED (ATE)>

    <DECOYS: DRAGGING ENEMY PIECES WHERE THEY DO NOT WANT TO GO>

    GM Hebden, Mark L (2560) - Wheeler, Darren P (2236) 4NCL 2010-11 Daventry ENG (2.11), 2010.11.07
    1.d4 e6 2.Nf3 d5 3.c4 c5 4.e3 Nc6 5.cxd5 exd5 6.Bb5 Bd6 7.O-O Nge7 8.dxc5 Bxc5 9.b3 O-O 10.Ba3 Bxa3 11.Nxa3 Qa5 12.Bxc6 bxc6 13.Nc2 c5 14.Qd2 Qxd2 15.Nxd2 Ba6 16.Rfc1 Rfd8 17.e4 c4 18.b4 d4 19.b5 Bxb5 20.Na3 c3 21.Nxb5 cxd2 22.Rd1 Rab8 23.Na3 Rdc8 24.Kf1 d3 25.Nb1 Rb2 26.Nxd2 Rcc2 27.Ke1 f5 28.Rac1 Rxc1 29.Rxc1 fxe4 30.Rc4 Nd5 31.Rxe4 Rxa2 32.Nc4 Nc3 33.Rd4 d2+ 34.Nxd2 Ra1+ 35.Nb1 Rxb1+ 36.Kd2 Nb5 37.Rd7 Rb2+ 38.Ke3 a5 39.Rd8+ Kf7 40.Ra8 Rb3+ 41.Kf4 Rb4+ 42.Ke5 a4 43.f4 Rc4 44.f5 Rc5+ 45.Kf4 a3 46.g4 Rc7

    ---

    Here is a *wicked* attacking game by IM-elect Mandizha:

    http://main.uschess.org/content/vie...

    33 ?


    click for larger view

    33 h4-h5+! 1-0 <blocking: h5>


    click for larger view

    Liberty Bell Open, Philadelphia 2011
    White: Mandizha, Farai
    Black: Stuart S Finney

    1.g3 d5 2.Bg2 Nf6 3.Nf3 e6 4.O-O Be7 5.d3 O-O 6.Nbd2 c5 7.a4 Nc6 8.Re1 Qc7 9.e4 b6 10.Qe2 Bb7 11.e5 Nd7 12.c3 a6 13.Nf1 b5 14.h4 Nb6 15.axb5 axb5 16.Rxa8 Rxa8 17.N1h2 b4 18.Ng4 Ra2 19.cxb4 Nxb4 20.Bf4 Ba6 21.Nf6+ Bxf6 22.exf6 Qd8 23.Ne5 gxf6 24.Qg4+ Kf8 25.Bh6+ Ke7 26.Nxf7 Qc8 27.Qg7 Kd7 28.Rxe6 Kxe6 29.Bh3+ f5 30.Bxf5+ Kxf5 31.Qe5+ Kg6 32.Nd6 Qg4 33.h5+ 1-0


    12 games, 1954-2017

  7. Blocking square: N attackers, N+1 defenders min
    To keep N enemy pieces from occupying a square, the minimum required force is N defenders of that square.

    But if -you- want to occupy a square for whatever reason (e.g., <BLOCK> an attack from an enemy line piece) that the opponent controls <N> times, then you must control the square at least <N+1> times.

    That is, you are not trying to prevent your opponent from occupying a square; rather, it is one of your -own- pieces that you want to safely occupy a square. In this case <N+1> times is the minimum required and the fact that this number is the minimum means <LOOSENESS>.

    8 games, 1908-2007

  8. BLUNDER!
    7 games, 1987-2013

  9. BOGO(++): THREATEN (BUY) ONE SQUARE, GET ANOTHER
    10 games, 1969-2013

  10. BOLOGAN TEACHES TACTICS
    2 games, 2010-2011

  11. Break a pin by making a bigger threat
    2 games, 2008

  12. Breaking an alignment is a full-time job
    The piece breaking the alignment must stay on the line like it is <PINNED>. So it can be exploited in the exact same way as a <PINNED> piece: take what it does not <DEFEND> or pile on it to make it leave the line.

    Usually the <ALIGNMENT> of pieces that needs to be broken (<BLOCKING THE CORRIDOR> from inside) involves the king, especially when the king is <LINED UP> with the queen.

    10 games, 1858-2008

  13. BREAKING COMMUNICATION
    1 game, 2013

  14. BREAKING COMMUNICATION (CHERNEV & REINFELD)
    1 game, 2013

  15. Budapest Defense/Gambit
    4 games, 1896-2008

  16. BUILDING A TUNNEL FOR YOUR KING: SHIELDING FLIGH
    1 game, 2010

  17. C = M + S + D
    1 game, 2002

  18. C63 Ruy Lopez, Schliemann Defense
    4 games, 1904-2009

  19. CALCULATE LIKE A COMPUTER! OR IVANOV. SAME THING
    1 game, 2013

  20. Can you gain tempo with piece you want to move?
    Whenver you want to move a piece, you should check whether you can gain a tempo with that piece. -- Weteshchnik, "Understanding Chess Tactics", page 157
    4 games, 1921-2007

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